• Tommaso Boddi/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's been nearly three years since former "Grey’s Anatomy" and "Private Practice" star Kate Walsh had to face her own health scare.The actress told Cosmopolitan magazine last year that she had a benign tumor in her brain removed in 2015.Now Walsh, 50, is prioritizing herself and encouraging other women to prioritize their health."You can never talk too much about how important it is for women to be proactive about their health," she told ABC News.She was one of the many women -- along with Melissa Joan Hart, Tatyana Ali, and "The Bachelorette" star Rachel Lindsay -- to walk the catwalk at this year's Go Red for Women Red Dress Collection.Held Thursday night inside New York City's Hammerstein Ballroom, the American Heart Association's fashion show, which helps raise awareness for how heart disease affects women, kicked off New York Fashion Week.Walsh said that now her trick to self-care involves lots and lots of water."I walk around with this giant water bottle," the actress said. "It's a half-gallon. So if I make it through one of these a day, I'm doing great."Walsh added that her water at times includes apple cider vinegar, lemons and astragalus root, which is considered by some to be an anti-aging and stress-reducing herb."I'm always keeping inflammation low," she explained of her additions.Along with keeping a diet high in good fats and protein -- "tons of veggies," she said -- Walsh loves walking. In fact, it's one of the reasons why she moved back to New York, she said.But just because she's focused on her health doesn't mean she doesn't splurge sometimes."I'm not going to stay away from my potato chips and by the way I love regular Doritos," she gushed. "I like the orange powder."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Tucson Airport Authority/Storyful
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A “bucket list” could be a roadmap for your doctor.A new study in the Journal of Palliative Medicine proposes that your bucket list, a list of things that one has not done before but wants to do before dying, can become a shorthand for the goals-of-care conversation that everybody tiptoes around but one that is especially important as you age or develop chronic medical conditions.This study states that a Google search for “bucket list” turned up nearly 84 million results compared to the mere 4.5 million results for the term “advance directives” -- that is, a written statement of people's wishes about end-of-life care.Thus, the concept of a "bucket list" might be a more approachable way to engage patients about their health behaviors and health-related decisionmaking, the study's authors suggest.Researchers from the Stanford Unversity School of Medicine conducted an online survey of 3,056 participants across the United States found that about 91 percent of respondents had a bucket list.Six common themes emerged on the respondents’ bucket list: travel, accomplishing a personal goal, hitting specific life milestones (see kids get married, become a grandmother), spending quality time with friends and family, getting financial stability, and doing a daring activity (go deep-sea fishing).The desire to travel was the most prevalent item followed by the desire to accomplish a personal goal. The desire to spend quality time with friends and family was also a popular theme, but mainly among participants greater than 63 years of age.In a press release about the study, one of the authors reported that she had a patient with gallbladder cancer who was really stressed because he wanted to take his family to Hawaii but had treatment for the cancer scheduled.After an informed discussion about his options and side effects of cancer treatment, they were able to make a decision that aligned with his goals. He went to Hawaii, then came back for treatment.“Patients don’t see the relevance of an advance directive,” said VJ Periyakoil, M.D., in the press release. “They do see the relevance of a bucket list as a way to help them plan ahead for what matters most in their lives.”The study concludes by suggesting that clinicians use patients' bucket lists as a "starting point" to crafting personal care plans. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- When Zeus ran away from his California home over a year ago, David Guindon thought his husky was gone for good. Thanks to a microchip, however, Zeus has been found. But, Guindon says, the woman who has him is refusing to give him back.Guindon bought Zeus in 2014 as a service dog after he suffered a stroke and heart attack that left him unable to walk, he told ABC Los Angeles station KABC-TV.Zeus helped him get around his San Bernardino home in his motorized wheelchair, Guindon told the station."If I want to go outside I just tell him, ‘Open the door.’ He'd flip it open for me," Guindon said. "[He would] hold it open long enough so I could get towards it and get out."  In May 2016, Guindon said, Zeus escaped through the front door. He searched everywhere for the missing dog, posting signs and even hiring a pet detective but Zeus had disappeared.Then, a year and a half later, he received a phone call from the microchip company. The lost dog had popped up in another woman’s possession and she was trying to re-register the dog in her name."I said, ‘Oh no! I want my dog back,’” Guindon told KABC.He said neither the microchip company nor animal control would release the woman’s information. The only details they would provide were her name, “Shawnee,” and that she lives about an hour away in Lake Elsinore, California.
    Read more...
  • Courtesy Samantha Clark(NEW YORK) -- A little over a year ago, Mickey and Samantha Clark were moving across Oregon. The couple, who had been undergoing fertility treatments, needed to bring their frozen embryos along to another clinic closer to their new home.So they decided to have a little fun with the embryos along the way by taking some fun pictures.Samantha told "Good Morning America" that the photos only "took all of 10 minutes" to take and, now, they've been seen around the world. "We were cracking up the whole time," she said. Three of those embryos have been born and, today, they turn 6 months old. It's a sweet celebration for a couple who never knew if they would have a family. "I had endometriosis and PCOS [polycystic ovary syndrome]," Samantha said. "We knew before we got married that it would be difficult to have children, so we decided to forgo a wedding to save our money to pursue having kids through adoption, foster care or infertility treatments." The couple didn't have any luck with adoption or foster care. They intended to try a medicated intrauterine insemination (IUI), she said, but she produced so many eggs because of her PCOS that it wasn't possible. So the couple had to come up with $12,000 for an in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, which they ultimately ended up getting the money from an aunt. From the IVF procedure came their six embryos which needed to be frozen. So when it came time for the couple to move, they couldn't leave those embryos behind and decided to take them on a bit of an adventure. The couple was assured by their doctor it was fine to take a few photos and they were very gentle, she said. "I didn't actually go down that slide," she said. "And the swing wasn't really moving." The embryos also met their great-grandparents, she said, and they were amazed by the science that allowed them to meet their great-grandchildren before they were born. The fraternal triplets were named Shepherd, Eleni, and Ayla Clark. Samantha said she hopes their family's story brings hope to other couples struggling with infertility.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Julian Simmonds - Pool/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Prince William cautioned young women about body images they see online in surprise remarks to students about the challenges they face growing up in the internet era. “I worry for you girls,” William, 35, told students at Burlington Danes Academy in West London, where he surprised the students at an assembly. “The touched-up pictures are not real,” William said. “Don’t try to recreate them or think that’s what you’ve got to aim for. There’s a lot of fakeness online so don’t worry about that.” William cautioned young teenage girls, who are often subjected to body image issues that can result in anorexia, bulimia and other mental health issues, to ignore airbrushed photos that often distort females bodies. While not addressing any celebrities by name, he told the students he wanted them to understand they shouldn’t hold themselves to unrealistic expectations. He also addressed boys at the assembly, encouraging them to share their feelings even if they feel reluctant to do so. “It’s really important for boys. We’re not very good at talking about our emotions and how we feel," he said. "Girls have got a little bit better and, boys, we’ve really got to work hard on being able to talk to friends, family and trusted people about how we feel.” William, the father of Princess Charlotte, 2, and Prince George, 4, is expecting his third child with Princess Kate in April.  The second in line to the throne has shared that cyberbullying and children’s mental health are issues he cares about deeply since becoming a father.William released a first-of-its-kind online cyberbullying code last November, called "Stop, Speak, Support." William released the code after convening a yearlong task force, the Royal Foundation’s Taskforce on Cyberbullying, comprised of officials from leading social media and technology firms including Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Google.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...