• Support Dogs Inc.(NEW YORK) -- This 6-month-old kitten holds his own among 23 support dogs.DOG the cat, pronounced dee-OH-gee, isn’t just named after canines, he also thinks he is one.The friendly feline lives at Support Dogs, Inc., in St. Louis, Missouri, and helps train the pups.“He rules the roost. He is the boss,” owner Anne Klein told ABC News.Klein said DOG has become a “training tool” for the assistance dogs as they through their two-year training process to be placed, free of charge, with people who have mobility issues, are deaf or hard of hearing. The dogs are also used in courtrooms during difficult situations for children.“In our training, our dogs have to be so well-behaved and not be reactive in many situations, so when a cat goes scampering in front of them and they’re in a down-stay, the command, they don’t go running after him,” said Klein. “They have to be well-behaved and not get distracted. He’ll go scampering by and they have to be good, obedient.”DOG certainly gives them a run for their money. Klein said he loves to pull at the pup’s tails and bat at their noses.But mostly, “he’ll just snuggle up with them on their dog beds,” she said.The kitten has a 5-foot-tall kitty condo in the middle of the office where he lives. Klein said when her staff returns in the morning, you can tell right away how rambunctious DOG has been overnight.“Oftentimes when we come in the morning, he’s taken push pins off our bulletin boards and rearranged our papers,” she said with a laugh. “We’re not sure what he’s doing at night but he’s rearranging things to his liking.”Despite his pesky behavior, “He’s certainly won the hearts of lots of dog lovers,” Klein said of everyone in their office.“He’s definitely earned his keep, even though he’s cat,” she added.
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  • Obtained by ABC News(NEW YORK) -- After a 2011 semi-truck accident crushed his hip and legs, Buddy Rich's weight increased to over 300 pounds and he fell into a suicidal depression.“The one thing that stopped me was my daughter,” the Florida military veteran said of his thoughts of suicide. His daughter was born just three weeks before the accident.Rich had served in U.S. Army as a specialist in an engineering detachment from 2003 to 2008 and in the Army Reserves from 2008 to 2011. Afterward, he returned to school and worked for a delivery company. One of his closest friends in the military had committed suicide after they had both retired from service.Rich was inspired to try yoga to cut his weight and strengthen his muscles after he stumbled across a viral video of another disabled vet named Arthur Boorman who lost weight following a yoga plan by former pro wrestler Diamond Dallas Page.In the years that followed, Rich reduced his weight by 125 pounds and regained much of his mobility.Just a few weeks ago, he taught his daughter how to ride a bike while running alongside her.“I never thought I was going to get to wrestle with my kids, pick them up, anything. [Now] I can be a dad again,” said Rich.He was surprised when Diamond Dallas Page showed up on the doorstep of his Apollo Beach, Florida, home to congratulate him on his successful training and to do a backyard workout with Rich.“I can’t believe the dude who like changed my life is in front of me,” said Rich, “It’s unbelievable.”
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  • ABC News(LONDON) -- A London woman is using her maternity leave for her second child to travel the world with her family.Karen Edwards, 33, is traveling through the U.S., Central America and South America with her husband, Shaun Bayes; their daughter, Esmé, 3; and 4-month-old son, Quinn. Edwards also took maternity leave after her daughter's birth in 2014 to travel the world.The family left London on their monthslong adventure when Quinn was just 9 weeks old.“It’s actually easier than being at home because at home you've got so much more things to do in just running a household,” Edwards told ABC News. “We’re really happy with what we're doing.”The family visited Spain and Canada and drove down the West Coast of the U.S. before visiting Belize, Guatemala and El Salvador.They’ve stayed in beach cabanas, camper vans, hotels and with local families along the way.“I do believe that it's definitely character-building,” Edwards said, adding that Quinn “doesn't blink an eyelid” to being in a new bedroom almost nightly.Quinn has already visited seven countries in his four months of life, while Esmé has visited nearly 30 countries at age 3.Edwards and Bayes decided, after Edwards unexpectedly became pregnant with Esmé, they would keep traveling as they’d loved to do as a couple.When Esmé was 10 weeks old, the family left London for Bayes’ native New Zealand and then traveled throughout Southeast Asia.Edwards, a nurse manager at a London hospital, receives full or partial payment through nine months of maternity leave. The last three months of her leave are unpaid, but the family rents out their house in London to help cover expenses.Bayes works in construction and has flexibility with his work schedule.Edwards said the great experience spending a year traveling with Esmé inspired her and Bayes to do the same with Quinn.“The most enjoyable bit was just having unlimited time for Esmé and seeing her developing without having many distractions,” she said. “We didn't have a house to maintain and we didn't have errands to run, so it was just her and us two parents being parents.”Edwards and Bayes started a blog where they document their travels with their kids."Most of the [reaction] is positive and heartwarming, that we've inspired them to do something similar," Edwards said.The family has faced criticisms for exposing their kids to foreign countries at such a young age. Edwards reminds critics that she is a nurse and they take “all necessary precautions.”“This is the thing: we were already really into traveling,” Edwards said. “If it's something that you really enjoy anyway, you want to pass that onto your kid in some way.”
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  • (ABC News) ABC News' James Longman tries on Richard Browning's jet suit.(READING, England) -- British inventor Richard Browning is a real-life Iron Man.Recently, Browning, the man behind the 1,050-horsepower, jet-engine flying Gravity suit, set a new world record for the "fastest speed in a body controlled jet engine powered suit."He achieved a speed of 32.02 mph over a lake at Lagoona Park in Reading, England, according to Guinness World Records.Browning told ABC News that in March 2016, he started tossing around an idea: "Could you approach the challenge of human flight in an entirely different way by augmenting the human body with power, with horsepower? ... Rather than putting the human being inside a flight machine."That question was the starting point for his flying suit."This started out as, I suppose, an opportunity to go and try and achieve something that hadn't been done before," he said. "It was the challenge really. The sheer hell of the challenge. ... Learning from failure has been the fuel that's driven our journey."At the time, Browning was working for an oil company, handling oil trading and implementing new technology. In his free time, though, he pursued several projects."I suppose that throughout my life, especially as a kid, I used to enjoy making things, taking things apart, visiting my father in a workshop," he told ABC News. "I suppose that I have always been quite technically minded in, at least, my day job career."He described the jet-suit as a project that "got slightly out of hand."First, he started with one small gas turbine attached to arm mounts. Eight months later, at a nearby farm, he had a breakthrough when he attached an engine to each leg and two turbines on each arm. He managed six seconds of controlled, stable flight. Later, he added two more turbines.The current jet suit includes six turbines, a fuel system and an electronic control system."Core to this journey has been ... a very strong ethos, very close to my heart, around having an idea and spending less time agonizing over whether it's going to be possible and more time about finding some way of turning that idea, that concept into something tangible and go and test it," he said, "and learn from that testing."His company, Gravity Industries, made a deal with its first investor in early 2017 and has already sold a copy of the original jet suit.Browning said that while the Marvel character Iron Man had not been the original start point for the jet suit, he remains a fan and loved that people made that connection with it."It is wonderful, especially with kids," he said. "They draw this great parallel."His goal, Browning added, is to make flying a reality for more people."I know we're only at the beginning of this journey," he said. "I can't help but be quite excited about the journey we're on. It's a pleasure."
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  • shironosov/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In a breakthrough treatment, researchers at a burn unit in Germany found a way to replace 80 percent of a boy’s skin using a combination of gene therapy and stem cells. The grafted skin attached to his body has continued to replace itself, even months later.The patient –- a boy who was 7 years old at the time of the treatment –- was born with a rare skin condition called junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The condition causes the outer layer of the skin to peel away easily from the lower skin layers, making it incredibly fragile and prone to injury.“This is a very severe, devastating disease, where kids suffer a lot,” said Dr. Michele De Luca, one of the authors of the research.Experts not involved in the research have said this successful grafting treatment is a big step for those suffering from genetic skin conditions like this one.“This is really quite exciting, to have this translation for these patients,” said Dr. Dennis Orgill, medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Wound Center in Boston, who was not involved with the study. "That they can do these genetic manipulations and then have a long term result, which they’ve demonstrated here, is a major breakthrough."In this case, the treatment may have been lifesaving. The patient arrived at the hospital with a life-threatening bacterial skin infection spread over much of his body. Over the following weeks, his doctors tried everything they could to treat him without success.Out of options, his treatment team was preparing to start end-of-life care when his parents pleaded with them to try an experimental therapy.Surgeons in Germany took a sample of the boy’s skin, less than one square inch in size, that was unharmed by the bacterial infection. In a lab, researchers infected the skin biopsy with a virus specially designed to alter the genetic code within the skin cells, “correcting” the mutation responsible for his fragile skin. The researchers "grew" the skin and used it to surgically replace the patient’s blistered and destroyed skin.After 21 months, the new skin is regenerating itself without problems and has been resilient; it can hold up to normal wear much better than his original skin.While this result only applies to one rare skin disorder right now, experts said the approach could be used more widely for other diseases in the future.“We are running other clinical trials on other kinds of junctional epidermolysis bullosa," De Luca said. "In the future, it could be applied to other genetic diseases of the skin.”Researchers hope that it could help other people with seriously damaged skin in the future, too.“This technology could be extended into other patients with genetic conditions, or patients with extensive burns,” Orgill said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • (Courtesy: Angel Taylor) Angel Taylor, 34, of Arlington, Texas, seen with her husband Mark Taylor, 34, and the couple's four children, Jordyn, 12, Juliyn, 9 Jaxsyn, 3 and Jestyn, 9 months.(ARLINGTON, Texas) -- A father's silent reaction was recorded on video as he learned the sex of his fifth child.Mark Taylor, 34, stood shocked and speechless as he walked through the door to pink balloons on his living room floor -- revealing that he'd soon be a dad to five girls.Angel Taylor, 34, said her husband, a father of four, was quiet for a whole two hours after learning the news.“He just wouldn’t talk,” Angel Taylor of Arlington, Texas, told ABC News. “He busted out laughing a couple of times. I thought it was hilarious actually.”Angel Taylor said that her husband thought that for sure, this child would be a boy -- especially after the couple had suffered a miscarriage."My husband's thinking, 'This is a miracle baby, so this has to be a boy,'” she added. “He always wanted to call the baby [boy] Tre. I already came to terms that this was a baby girl.”On Oct. 25, Angel Taylor filmed her husband as she and their four daughters, Jordyn, 12, Juliyn, 9, Jaxsyn, 3, and Jestyn, 9 months, announced the news of girl No. 5.Once the shock wore off, dad was excited that No. 5 would once again be a little girl. "Wow," he says in the video, as he took a sip of beer.“Five is my favorite number, so five girls is fitting," Mark Taylor said in a statement to ABC News.Baby Jazlyn is due to arrive May 3.
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