• ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- As President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress gear up for another attempt at repealing and replacing Obamacare, an ABC News/Washington Post poll finds broad public preference for keeping and improving it — including high levels of support for some of its key components.See PDF with full results here.Just 37 percent of Americans in the national survey say the Affordable Care Act should be repealed and replaced; 61 percent say it should be kept and fixed instead. Even more broadly, the public, by 79 to 13 percent, says Trump should seek to make the current law work as well as possible, not to make it fail as soon as possible, a strategy he has suggested.These lopsidedly pro-Obamacare views are far different from the results of an ABC/Post poll in mid-January asking if Americans supported or opposed repealing the ACA: 46 and 47 percent, respectively. That question did not offer “keeping and improving” it as an alternative, and it was asked before the contours of the first, failed effort to repeal the law were known.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MANISTEE, Mich.) -- When Corinne Bass learned that her recovery from a recent bone marrow transplant would mean missing her senior prom, she and medical staff improvised to bring the party to the hospital.Since August 2015, Bass had been battling aplastic anemia, a rare blood disorder. At the time, she was a high school junior in Manistee, Michigan."Aplastic anemia is basically your bone marrow not working," she said. "Your bone marrow is failing and that means you are not producing platelets, white cells or red cells."She began intensive treatments. After her family moved to Grand Rapids, Bass was told by doctors that she would need a bone marrow transplant. In February, she received a transplant and continued receiving treatment at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital.During her lengthy hospital stay, Bass completed schoolwork, even receiving advanced-placement biology lessons at her bedside. She celebrated her 18th birthday at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital.And, in March, with the help of her mother and the staff at Helen Devos, she planned her prom. It had to be held at the hospital, among a small group of people, to protect Bass from germs and infection."Since she was diagnosed, she has missed a lot of high school experiences," her mother, Heather Wilson, told Spectrum Health. "It's very important to get to do something like this."She gave the party a "Great Gatsby" theme, complete with decorations, music and party favors.The hospital's staff even got involved, finding Bass a dress as well as a limousine. Donning a sparkly 1920s dress, a headband, Mary Jane heels and yellow nail polish, Bass was first driven around in the limousine and then escorted on a red carpet to her prom."I think that they went beyond my expectations of what I thought it was going to be," Bass said of the staff. "I've been with them for so long that they're now like family."Some of the staff also dressed in 1920s garb, dancing and toasting the day, and presented Bass with red roses."I have, like, this prom that I can remember," she said. "It's just really special ... It made up for the prom that I didn't get to go to."
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  • moodboard/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) -- There's rooftop yoga and hot yoga and nude yoga.There's even goat yoga.But if you're looking for the kind of yoga that will not only bring you inner peace but make your Instagram followers turn green with envy, look no further than heli-yoga.It's a new Las Vegas experience from Maverick Helicopters. The company will transport guests from the Strip to the highest point in the Valley of Fire for a 75-minute yoga class led by Dray Gardner of Silent Savasana.Up to six people can charter the chopper for the $3,500 experience. Requests must be made well in advance as the company has to clear the flight and landing with the state park.Maverick pilot Riley Troy told ABC News their clients are the type of people who are not only looking to stay health-conscious on vacation, but who want to experience "the latest and greatest Las Vegas has to offer."Yogis wear headphones during the class. Gardner, the instructor, said this eliminates noise pollution and the interaction becomes solely between the instructor and student.His company, he said, "always tries to take yoga places it should not be." The company is the same one behind Vegas's Yoga in the Sky experience, where students take a class on the city's High Roller observation wheel.Part of the reason to offer yoga in such unusual places is to "open the eyes" of people who might not otherwise be drawn to the practice. "I teach to the kindergartner, but if there's a PhD in the class, we tailor it to them too."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- This week, the World Health Organization kicks off World Immunization Week "to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease."In the U.S., overall vaccination compliance remains high for many childhood immunizations, with at least 90 percent of children getting the recommended vaccinations on time for measles/mumps/rubella, polio and chickenpox, according to a 2015 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.However, the CDC found other vaccination rates fell below its target for what's known as herd immunity, or a population's resistance to the spread of a disease that results when a high percentage of individuals are immune. This included below than ideal vaccination rates for diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (80 percent), hepatitis B (89 percent), and the gastrointestinal disease rotavirus (68 percent).In recent years, outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles or pertussis have made headlines, revealing how pockets of unvaccinated or undervaccinated people may still present a problem.The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has been documenting outbreaks -- here's a look at some past and current outbreaks, and how health officials are responding.MumpsIn the last year, there has been a huge upswing in the number of mumps cases in the U.S. In 2016, there were multiple outbreaks of the mumps resulting in 5,748 total reported cases in the U.S. Comparatively, there were just 229 cases in 2015. Washington state has had 771 mumps cases since the start of an outbreak last October.Earlier this month, Texas reported an outbreak of mumps that infected 221, the highest number since 1994, when 234 cases were reported, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said in an earlier interview that the recent mumps outbreaks appear to be occurring in populations with high vaccination rates."Although people are vaccinated, after about 15 years, there is some waning of immunity and if you get a strong exposure that exposure can overcome that diminished protection and you'll get a case of mumps," said Schaffner.The CDC has confirmed that its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is reviewing vaccinations for mumps and considering recommending a booster shot during an outbreak.MeaslesThere have been multiple measles outbreaks in recent years that have infected hundreds in Ohio, California and Minnesota, according to the AAP. On Monday, the Minnesota Department of Health reported at least 20 children under the age of 5 have been infected with the virus. Currently, 16 of these children have been confirmed to be unvaccinated against the virus.Once a measles outbreak starts in an area with low vaccinations, it can be difficult to control, according to the CDC. Measles is one of the most infectious viruses in existence. It will infect 90 percent of susceptible people if they are exposed. The airborne virus can also remain in the air for hours, infecting people if they are in the same vicinity as someone who is ill, according to the CDC.The measles virus was declared eradicated from the U.S. in 2000 and reached an all-time low with just 37 cases in 2004.PertussisWhooping cough or pertussis has been significantly reduced by vaccines but continues to occur, since the vaccine's effectiveness decreases over time. Approximately four years after getting a vaccine for whooping cough, just three or four out of 10 people are protected against the virus, according to the CDC.The CDC reports that there are between 10,000 to 40,000 cases of pertussis every year and up to 20 deaths.In California, a massive outbreak of pertussis infected 9,934 in 2014. Just two years earlier, Washington state reported 2,530 cases, according to the AAP.California gets tough about vaccinationsThere has been some good news on the vaccination front. This month, California
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Malaria may seem like a disease from bygone days to many people in the United States.But a new study published Monday in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene finds that, every year, more than a thousand patients are hospitalized in the U.S. for malaria infections -- virtually all contracted in other countries -- with some turning deadly.While malaria used to be endemic in the U.S., the disease, which is usually spread through infected mosquitoes, was effectively eradicated in the states by the 1950's, according to the study authors.However, malaria is still a massive health problem worldwide with 212 million cases reported globally each year, causing approximately 429,000 deaths, according to the World Health Organization. People who travel outside the U.S. remain susceptible to the disease."The number of imported malaria cases has steadily increased in the United States," the study authors wrote. "Similar to other countries that eliminated malaria, this increase has mostly occurred among returned travelers, as well as among foreign visitors and immigrants from malaria-endemic countries."Malaria is a parasitic disease primarily spread by mosquitoes to humans. Symptoms may appear vague at first including fever, chills and other flu-like symptoms. If untreated, the disease can be fatal. Those traveling to areas where the disease is endemic are at higher risk, though they can take prophylactic medication to reduce the chances of infection.To understand how people in the U.S. are affected by malaria, researchers from various institutions including the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) studied national patient data. They found an average of 1,469 annual hospitalizations for malaria in the U.S. between 2000 to 2014.Researchers found that between 2000 to 2014 there were 22,029 total malaria-related hospitalizations; 4,823 of the cases were designated as "severe," with 182 deaths reported. They used hospital discharge data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which contains about 20 percent of hospital discharge records nationwide.This group of malaria patients often required multiple days in the hospital. They spent 4.36 days, on average, with a mean bill of $25,789 for all hospitalizations. Men accounted for about 60 percent of these malaria cases and more than than half, 52.5 percent, were black. The highest number of cases -- a combined 71 percent -- were reported in the southern and northeast regions of the U.S.The actual number of malaria cases may be higher, since some people may not come to the hospital for treatment. The authors estimate an average of 2,128 people may have malaria each year in the U.S.High numbers of imported malaria increase the chance of a local outbreak, as well. Between 1957 and 2015 there have been "63 outbreaks of locally transmitted mosquito-borne malaria," according to the CDC."There are elements of this that are perhaps surprising," said Dr. William Schaffner, infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical School. "Over 22,000 admissions for malaria in hospitals in the U.S. ... I wouldn't have thought it was that large."Because many doctors learn about malaria in medical school, but rarely see live cases, Schaffner said, diagnosing the disease at an early stage can be difficult. Patients coming into the ER for treatment may be "the first case they've ever seen."And though few people contract malaria within the U.S., the study authors note that remains a challenge for treatment."Despite the reduction of malaria incidence in developing countries, malaria continues to be an important public health problem in the United States," the authors said. "Despite its elimination in the early 1950s, and the disease burden remains substantial."
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  • ABC News(MILFORD, Va.) -- A toddler danced the night away Friday after attending a teen's high school prom.Taylor Schafer, 17, a student at Caroline High School in Milford, Virginia, invited Finn Blumenthal, 2, to accompany her to the dance. Finn was born with a congenital heart defect, which causes life-threatening medical challenges.When Finn was born, he survived 10 surgeries, including three procedures on his heart, mom Kelly Blumenthal of Fredericksburg, Virginia, told ABC News in February."When you're presented with a medically challenged child that has an uncertain future, you feel kind of robbed, especially of certain life experiences and milestones ... but he has gone to prom and had a great night," Blumenthal told ABC News today."That's something that as a parent, brings a lot of joy. Him being able to look back at photos and look back at the happy night, that's all because of Taylor."Blumenthal met Taylor in October through a mutual acquaintance."He had so many limits on what he was allowed to do in the past and seeing him overcome those limits [is] wonderful," Taylor told ABC News in February.At the time, Blumenthal called Taylor’s gesture "a dream come true."She said, "The fact that I can check this off the list no matter what is a relief. I can't repay her for that."On the special night last week, Finn wore his black tuxedo and gave a corsage to Taylor. He got to ride in the limo to the prom, danced to his favorite song, "Rawr" by Katy Perry, and was even crowned "prom prince," Blumenthal said.
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