• ABC News(HARLINGEN, Texas) -- After Yvette Luna discovered she was pregnant in high school, she transferred to Keys Academy in Harlingen, Texas, where her parents hoped the small student-teacher ratio would help Luna stay on track to graduate.Years later, she thanked her math teacher, Juan Antonio Fraga, 66, for giving her “the skills that I needed to be successful.”“Keys [Academy] is not just about economics. It’s about people who are helping people, building up relationships. The job sometimes is not that easy because a lot of students might not be initially focused as to what they want to do,” said Fraga.Luna, 31, said Fraga taught her skills that went far beyond basic equations.“I want to say thank you for always believing in me when things were tough. There was times when I didn’t believe in myself, and you believed in me. You allowed me to go further my education and I thank you for that,” she said.Yvette now teaches fourth grade at a local elementary school. In 2017, Fraga and his former student both received “Teacher of the Year” awards from their respective schools.“I love my students, I care about them. Those are the qualities that I got from Mr. Fraga that I take into my classroom,” said Luna.
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  • Joel Thomas(FESTUS, Mo.) -- A Missouri dad has received a special tattoo to help his 9-year-old son cope with year-old burn scars.In 2016, Landon Thomas accidentally fell into a bonfire at home and badly burned his right leg and foot, his father, Joel Thomas, told ABC News."At first, he had to wear compression socks to help him heal and even after, he wore long socks to hide [the scars]," said Thomas, 31, of Festus, Missouri.To give his son a boost of confidence, Thomas said he offered to get a tattoo that would match the scars Landon sustained.Thomas then put in an application to the show "Ink Master" on the Spike network. Two weeks ago, an episode of Thomas receiving his tattoo with Landon by his side aired.A spokeswoman for Spike told ABC News that Thomas was tattooed by “Ink Master” competitors Jessy Knuckles and Allisin Riot, employees of Pinz and Needlez tattoo shop in Maryland.“Joel and Landon were exactly the story we were hoping to tell: a dedicated and loving parent who wants to show his son that scars are what make you unique,” Ink Master's executive producer Andrea Richter wrote to ABC News in an email.Thomas’ fiancé Melissa Kuhlmann called Thomas’ tattoo a “beautiful reminder” of the bond between father and son.“I don’t know many people that would purposely scar themselves,” Kuhlmann told ABC News. “Joel would do anything for his children.”Thomas' scar tattoo is complete with Landon's initials."[Landon] loves it," Thomas said of the tattoo. "The fact that I was willing to carry that along with him--that load of the scar and the pain of something that happened in his life, it made us a lot closer."
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  • Chaotic Perfection Photography (LOS ANGELES) -- One newborn photographer never got a chance to give her own child the posed photos that new moms and dads love. So she decided that despite 21 years passing, she'd finally take "newborn" photos of her first son.Rebecca Hayes told ABC News that she got the idea to take the silly photos of her son, Clayton Jensvold, back in March right after photographing one of her clients."I threw it out there just sort of joking around," she recalled.Hayes, 38, had no idea that her partner and high school sweetheart David Ward would completely be on board. Their son, which Hayes had at 16 years old, was also game to her delight."He’s got a really quick wit and dry sense of humor and so he’s a hard read," Hayes said of her son, "but with this he just like sat up, saying, 'We have to do this.'"It was especially important for the couple, who dated for years in an Orange, California, high school before breaking up after they discovered they were expecting."It got a little bit complicated and we just parted ways," Hayes explained.The two both went on to marry and have children in those relationships. Still, after the death of Hayes' husband in 2013, she reconnected with her high school sweetheart, who helped her cope.It was perfect timing as Ward, 40, would soon need to lean on her once his wife was diagnosed with cancer in 2015. She passed away a year later."We didn’t know any other people who had passed so young so we had each other," Hayes said. "Then one day we looked at each other and said, 'What the hell?'"The two have been dating since January.Ward added of the full-circle moment, "It's weird but it's a good weird."
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  • ABC News (NEW YORK) -- Seven years before Greg Galeazzi put on a white coat at Harvard Medical School, he wore Army fatigues while serving a year-long deployment in Afghanistan.In May 2011 a roadside bomb tore off Captain Galeazzi’s legs and much of his right arm, just a month before he was expecting to return home.“It felt like I was an empty coke can on train tracks getting hit by a freight train moving at 100 miles per hour,” said Galeazzi.Without a medic on the ground, there was no available pain medication.“All I could do was scream,” Galeazzi recalled. “It’s hard to put into words that sickening, nauseating feeling to see that my legs were just gone.”Due to his unit’s remote position in northern Afghanistan, Galeazzi had little hope of receiving timely medical support.“I put my head back and just thought, 'I’m dead,'” he said.He passed out. Upon waking just minutes later, he discovered that his soldiers had successfully applied tourniquets to both his legs and right arm, which had been nearly severed at the shoulder. A half hour later a Medivac helicopter arrived to take him to the trauma bay.“What I found out then was that the real nightmare was really just beginning,” said Galeazzi.He endured over 50 surgeries, hundreds of hours of physical therapy, and numerous months as a hospital in-patient.But the traumatic experience and new limitations did not diminish Galeazzi’s dream of becoming a doctor.“Not only did I still want to practice medicine, but it strengthened my resolve to do it,” explained Galeazzi.Over the next few years, Galeazzi took more than 18 pre-medical courses and achieved his desired score on the MCAT entrance.Galeazzi was accepted into Harvard Medical School this past year and is the only student who uses a wheelchair in his class of 165 students. He has not yet decided what type of medicine he’ll eventually practice, but is leaning toward a primary care field.“You’re that first line of defense. You need to know a little bit about everything. I like the idea of being a jack of all trades,” he said.Galeazzi also looks forward to marrying his fiance Jazmine Romero next year.“Even though I’ve gone through this journey, it’s not lost on me how unbelievable this ride has been,” said Galeazzi.  Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- Fifteen countries in the European Union, along with Switzerland and Hong Kong, have received eggs tainted with an insecticide, according to the European Commission. The insecticide, fipronil, has been found in contaminated eggs from the Netherlands. Fipronil is used to kill lice and ticks on animals. It was banned by the EU in the food industry and has been linked to kidney, liver and thyroid-gland damage when eaten in large quantities. Farms in the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Germany were shut down after authorities confirmed that fipronil had been used, according to European Commission spokesman Daniel Rosario.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- At least five people have died from 2016 to present day after using gastric balloon systems to treat obesity, according to the Food and Drug Administration.
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