• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you're heading to the beach for Fourth of July fun this weekend, remember to be mindful of sharks.Shark attacks were reported on both ends of the country in the past two months, from Vero Beach, Florida, to Newport Beach, California.So whether you're on the East Coast or West Coast this weekend, experts say it's important to know how to stay safe in the water.Here are some tips from former Green Beret and survival expert Terri Schappert:1. Stay calm.If you see a shark, don't thrash or scream, Schappert told ABC News last summer. Just turn around, get out of the water and tell everyone else to get out, he said.Sharks pick up vibrations and smells, but they can't see you most of the time, Schappert said."The more you flail around ... [the sharks] are very attracted to that," Schappert said.2. Have a plan.Every beach-goer should have an evacuation plan, which includes knowing where the closest hospital is, Schappert said."Just think in your head, what would happen ... if someone you love just got bit? What now?" he said. "Don't be paranoid, but have a procedure. Think about how you'd get out of the water, then think about ... the chain of what would happen next.""Try not to freak out," Schappert added. "But know it's a possibility."3. Know first-aid.Most shark bites are on the limbs, according to Schappert, and when a shark's mouth hits a swimmer's arm or leg, "it's bound to sever an artery.""Shark bites are not smooth -- they're jagged -- which makes the wound worse," he said. And the more jagged the wound, the more it will bleed, so it's important to know first-aid."The best thing you can do for that person is to stop the bleeding," Schappert said, which, if the victim is bit on a limb, means applying a tourniquet.In 2014, Schappert took ABC News' Matt Gutman swimming in shark-infested waters off the Bahamas.To properly learn how to fend off sharks, Gutman pulled on 15 pounds of chain mail armour, and then put clothes on top to simulate real people’s finding themselves stuck in shark-infested waters after a plane or a boat crash.Gutman and Schappert then did what experts say not to do: flapping around in waters where sharks were feeding, wearing regular clothing.While they were in the water, Schappert's advice to Gutman was to:1. Slow down your movements.Fast movements give off the signal of prey, he said. Also conserving energy is key to survival in the above scenario.2. Team up.If there are two people in the water, Schappert recommended treading water back to back to limit the spheres of control by half, to 180 degrees each.3. Fight back.If the sharks begin attacking, fight them off, Schappert said.He recommended striking the sharks using quick, downward punching motions."All you can do is fight and let them know, 'I am not going down easy,'" Schappert told Gutman.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorGynecologists, dermatologists and women alike are excited about the latest option for giving women a way to improve intimacy.It's called ThermiVa and it's a Food and Drug Administration-cleared technique to improve skin tightening, help collagen formation and better blood vessel growth to the lower genital tract. The device uses temperature-controlled radio frequency technology in an office setting with no discomfort or downtime. It comes with a price tag of several thousand dollars for three treatments.Though not yet endorsed by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, ThermiVa use is growing as part of a mommy makeover and for women after menopause.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LAMPANG, Thailand) -- Prosthetic limbs aren’t just for people. They can be for elephants, too.Mosha the elephant, a permanent resident of the hospital run by the Friends of the Asian Elephant foundation in Thailand, is the first elephant ever to receive an effective and functional prosthetic leg.Mosha was just 7 months old when she lost her leg to a landmine on the Burmese border, according to the FAE’s website.As she continued to grow, her missing leg put tremendous pressure on her remaining three limbs and her spine. Luckily, the FAE was able to give Mosha a prosthetic leg, and the organization is continuously designing and creating new molds to accommodate the growing elephant. At the time of her injury, Mosha weighed about 1,300 pounds. Now, she weighs over 4,400 pounds.When Mosha waits for a new prosthetic leg, she is able to do things like lean against rails in order to relieve some of the pressure, the site says. Designing and constructing her new prosthetic is a very complex process.Fellow FAE hospital resident, Motola, also has a prosthetic leg. She was right behind Mosha as the second elephant to receive one. Unfortunately, Matola is not quite as comfortable in her new leg as Mosha is due to her growth patterns.FAE recently added a prosthesis factory to its facility, which will make the process more affordable and efficient, according to the website.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — What’s a Fourth of July cookout without corn on the cob?When butter, salt and pepper simply aren’t enough, try these four uncommon recipes to jazz up those ears of corn from Health.com.Naturally, the recipes call for fresh corn to be shucked then boiled or grilled. If boiling, drop the ears of corn in salted water for three minutes; if grilling, use your best judgment but don’t burn them.Be certain to slather these toppings onto cooked cobs.Maple Butter Corn on the Cob4 Tbsp. softened unsalted butter1 Tbsp. maple syrupPinch of course sea saltBrush 1 to 2 teaspoons on each ear of corn. (Save any extra for toast.)Creamy Chipotle Corn on the Cob1 seeded, minced chipotle1 Tbsp. lime juice2 Tbsp. mayonnaisePinch of salt and pepperBrush 1 to 2 teaspoons on each ear of corn.Pesto Parm Corn on the Cob1 tsp. olive oil1 tsp. pesto1 to 2 tsp. grated Parmesan cheeseSpread on 1 ear of corn.Classic Boil Corn on the Cob2 Tbsp. melted unsalted butter3/4 tsp. Old Bay seasoning1/4 tsp. garlic powderPinch of saltBrush 2 to 3 teaspoons on each ear of corn.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • DigitalVision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  A 75-year-old man from Renton, Washington, recently called 911 claiming he was in a small plane crash, only to discover it was all a dream that he says may have been brought on by a prescription sleeping aid he’d taken before bed.In audio of the emergency call, the man can be heard telling the operator that he's "pinned in" a plane that was in a "field with trees." He can be heard adding that there were three other people on board who were unconscious.Renton firefighters and police were dispatched to the man's home, where they found the caller not in a plane, but in his bed at home, according to NORCOM, a dispatch agency that services King County, Washington.The man was embarrassed and told emergency personnel that "it was all just a dream," a NORCOM spokesman told ABC News today, adding that emergency personnel determined he was OK and left.The caller, who wished not to be identified by name, told ABC News today that the incident happened in May after a recent surgery. He said he had been having trouble sleeping, so his daughter gave him half a pill of the sedative."It was a bad, terrible experience," he said.The 75-year-old added that he will "never again" take the drug and that he now just wants to put the scary episode behind him.The drug's developer says it has a 20-year track record and is perfectly safe when as directed.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Stem cells represent for some the promise of a cure from disease or relief from chronic pain conditions -- and businesses have taken notice, opening clinics that market different stem-cell treatments directly to consumers.While the use of unapproved stem-cell therapies is commonly associated with international “stem cell tourism,” a new analysis in the journal Cell Stem Cell indicates that this marketplace may be much larger in the United States than previously thought.By using internet key word searches, text mining, and content analysis of company websites, UC Davis stem cell researcher Paul Knoepfler and University of Minnesota bioethicist Leigh Turner found a total of 351 U.S. businesses offering stem-cell treatments in 570 clinics throughout the United States. Clinics were found throughout the country, with California, Florida and Texas having the highest number of clinics. Similar clusters were also seen in certain cites, most notably Beverly Hills, followed by New York and San Antonio.The majority of clinics advertised autologous treatments, which means using stem cells that come directly from the patient, usually from fat cells or bone marrow. However, an estimated one in five clinics marketed treatments with stem cells derived from other people, and two clinics offered “bovine amniotic cells” to patients -- meaning cells derived from the amniotic fluid of cows.The purported treatments offered by these clinics were varied, with the most common interventions advertised for orthopedic issues, followed by pain, sports injuries, neurologic conditions, and immune disorders. The authors note specific concern about the marketing of treatments for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, for which there is currently no consensus from the medical community that there are safe and effective stem cell treatments.James Hendrix, director of Global Science Initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association, shares these concerns.Although there are clinical studies being conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of stem cells in the treatment of disease and injury, he stressed that it is important to “make the distinction between what is research, and what is ready to be sold and marketed and provided to patients.”The treatments offered in these clinics “are unproven and not tested appropriately at this point," Hendrix added. "There’s no way to confirm that any of these clinics are providing stem cells, let alone whether they actually work.”His points echo those made by Turner and Knoepfler, who note that some clinics may not be meeting federal regulations regarding cells and tissues."From around 2009 to the present, businesses have been entering the marketplace on a routine basis, they've been coming in making marketing assertions about stem cells treating 30-40 different diseases, and no one's taking meaningful regulatory action," Turner said in a statement."Does that mean that people are getting access to safe and efficacious interventions or is there basically unapproved human experimentation taking place where people are going to these businesses and receiving experimental investigational cell-based interventions without being given a meaningful account of the lack of knowledge and evidence that they're being charged for?" Turner added.For now, it seems additional discussions into the ethical, legal and medical ramifications of these clinics are needed. Per Hendrix, stem cells and stem cell research “may lead to really great new understanding of disease as well as new therapies," he said. But "that is a step separate from what these clinics are doing today.” Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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