• Image Source White/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It can be easy to overindulge while traveling, but that may lead to feelings of regret once the vacation is over. How can we travel in a way where we maintain our balance and health. In the eighth episode of ABC News' "Healthy Living for Summer" series, we spoke with Julieanna Hever, a plant-based dietitian."If it's a really long flight I'll bring food with me, but if it's a short flight I'll eat when I get there," Hever said. "I'll eat whole foods as much as possible, not packaged foods which can be high in saturated fats, salts, sugars and oils."Below are a list of tips Hever gave ABC News.
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  • gelmold/iStock/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- Cholera has infected half a million people in the Middle Eastern nation of Yemen so far this year, according to a statement released this week by the World Health Organization -- and an estimated 2,000 of those people have already died from it. Health officials say 5,000 people in this country continue to become infected each day.Below are answers provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to some of the more common questions about this ancient but nonetheless devastating disease.What is cholera?Cholera is an illness caused by the bacterium known as Vibrio cholerae. The infection can range from mild, with no apparent symptoms, to severe illness. Between 5 to 10 percent of those infected will suffer the worst effects of the disease, which include severe diarrhea, vomiting and leg cramps. In the most serious cases, these symptoms can rob a sufferer of his or her body fluids quickly, leading to severe dehydration and shock. In these cases, not seeking immediate treatment can ultimately lead to death.How does someone get cholera?The bacteria that leads to cholera is found in food or water that has been contaminated by the feces of an infected person. Because of this, cholera is most common and can spread more quickly in areas where water treatment, sanitation and hygiene practices are inadequate. Epidemics are more likely to happen in these regions because people are at greater risk of consuming food or water from sources that have been contaminated by the feces of an infected person.This bacteria can also be found in the environment such as in briny rivers and coastal waters.In addition, a notable but less common cause of cholera infection is consuming raw or undercooked shellfish. There have been a few documented cases of cholera infection after consumption of such preparations of shellfish from the Gulf of Mexico.The illness is not directly contagious from person to person. This means that you can come into contact with an infected person and not have a higher risk of becoming sick, so long as you do not consume contaminated food and water.How many people are affected worldwide?In a given year, researchers estimate that cholera is responsible for 3 to 5 million cases of illness and over 100,000 deaths worldwide.How long does it take to experience symptoms after you are infected?After infection, a person can experience symptoms anywhere from within a few hours to five days later. On average, symptoms typically appear in two to three days.Is it common in the U.S.?The spread of cholera in the U.S. is very rare today. The real risk is to those Americans who travel to areas where cholera epidemics are common. These areas include regions of Africa, Asia, and South and Central America. Travelers returning from these regions should also be careful about what they bring home since contaminated seafood has been known to cause outbreaks of cholera in the U.S.How is cholera treated?Treatment includes immediate replacement of fluid and salts that the body loses in diarrhea. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is a common form of treatment not only for cholera, but for other diarrheal illnesses worldwide. Typically, it contains a prepackaged mixture of sugar and salts that a person can mix with water. In severe cases of illness, an individual may need fluid replacement given through his or her veins (intravenous or IV fluids). When these simple treatments are employed, less than 1 percent of cholera-infected patients die.On occasion, doctors will use antibiotic treatment in cholera; however, this step is not considered as important as prompt rehydration.How can I avoid getting infected?Sticking to simple precautions while visiting regions where cholera is present keeps the risk for cholera infection very low. A few quick tips:•  Only drink bottled, boiled, or chemically treated water. You should also make sure the seal is intact on bottled or canned beverages that you drink. Avoid t
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study published in the European Heart Journal Monday finds that being overweight increases your risk of coronary heart disease, even if you are otherwise considered healthy, destabilizing the common conception that someone can be "fat but fit.""Our findings suggest that if a patient is overweight or obese, all efforts should be made to help them get back to a healthy weight, regardless of other factors. Even if their blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol appear within the normal range, excess weight is still a risk factor," Dr. Camille Lassale, the lead author of the study said in a statement to the Imperial College London announcing the findings.Researchers analyzed thousands of incidences of coronary heart disease over a more than 12-year period in 10 countries in Europe. They found that being overweight or obese was associated with a more than 25 percent higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, even in people who did not have any other markers that reflected an increased risk of heart disease.Dr. Jennifer Ashton, ABC News' chief medical correspondent, said the research shows that even if people appear healthy based on blood tests today, the risk of health complications can increase over time if they are obese.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Animals across the country may react strangely on Monday as the first total solar eclipse to traverse the sky above the continental United States in decades takes place, experts say."In total solar eclipses, there are observations of animals going to sleep," Rick Schwartz, an animal behavior expert with the San Diego Zoo, told ABC News. "The animals take the visual cues of the light dimming, and the temperature cues.""You hear the increase of bird calls and insects that you usually associate with nightfall," Schwartz added. "Farmers have said that the cows lay down on the field or the chickens go back into the coop."Schwartz emphasized that reports of animals going berserk during solar eclipses is "anecdotal.""The reality is that because of the infrequency of solar eclipses, and because when it does happen, it is usually not in the same place, it is very hard to have actual scientific findings," Schwartz said of animal behavior during solar eclipses. "There have been observations at other zoos that animals didn’t react, which is also something to be noted."NASA has released a list of zoos across the country that are within the eclipse's path of totality and hosting special events on Aug. 21."Our animals are (we believe) completely unaware of the impending astronomical event," zookeepers at the Nashville Zoo in Tennesee wrote in a blogpost. "We are very curious to see how our animal collection will react to a false dusk, night and dawn taking place over the course of a few hours in the middle of the day."The Nashville Zoo is inviting visitors to record their observations of animal behavior during the eclipse and is giving out free protective glasses to the first 5,000 guests on the day of the eclipse.Schwartz told ABC News that as for house pets, their behavior is not likely to change, as "domestic animals that live with humans, their cues come from our behavior."Meanwhile, in an attempt to gain more insight into animal behavior during an eclipse, the California Academy of Sciences has launched a nationwide citizen scientist project, calling on participants to closely monitor the behavior of an individual organism during the upcoming eclipse and record their observations using an app.Schwartz said that the technology available to Americans now versus when the last total solar eclipse passed over the country may result in new findings."That is exciting to see what will come up, we might end up with a lot more data than we’ve had before," Schwartz said.He also encouraged eclipse watchers to take a moment to observe the behavior of animals for themselves on Monday."I would say if you are going to be out looking at the eclipse, as exciting and interesting as it is to watch, take a second or two to look away from the eclipse and listen for the wild birds and wild animals, and see what it is like when the planet goes dark," he said. "What do you observe?"
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  • Sonya Deklyen Nelson(WYOMING, Mich.) -- Carrie Deklyen is currently 21 weeks pregnant and on a ventilator and feeding tube. Her family says she chose to delay her own treatments for a life-threatening tumor to save her unborn baby. Now, they wait.Deklyen, 37, started having headaches in April. After the Wyoming, Michigan, mom woke up vomiting one morning and made a trip to the emergency room, doctors discovered a brain tumor.She was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain tumor. According to the American Brain Tumor Association, the "highly malignant" tumor spread quickly.Deklyen had brain surgery to try to remove the tumor. A few weeks later, her sister-in-law Sonya Nelson said that she found out she was pregnant.Though Deklyen had been planning to participate in a clinical trial at the University of Michigan, her family said, she was told she would need to terminate the pregnancy in order to do so."I asked her what she wanted to do. She said, 'We are keeping it,'" Carrie's husband Nick Deklyen told ABC News. "That always was my choice too, but I wanted her to decide because it was her life we were talking about."Deklyen then had three additional brain surgeries at Michigan Medicine, part of the University Michigan, the family said. Though the tumor was removed twice, it grew back.On July 27, Nelson drove Carrie Deklyen to the emergency room because she was having severe headaches."We thought she would have some fluid removed from her brain and we would head home, but instead she suffered a stroke," Sonya Nelson told ABC News."It has been almost three weeks since that day and Carrie has still not woken up," Nelson continued. "Some days we are hopeful that she will wake up because she will wiggle her toes or squeeze our hand. We want her to wake up."Nelson said the family was told the prognosis is not good, but the baby could survive."We are just hoping she can hold on long enough to deliver the baby," she said.Nick Deklyen said it's been difficult for their other children. The Michigan couple already has five kids -- Elijah, 18, Isaiah, 16, Nevaeh, 11, Lelia, 4, and Jez, 2."The older ones obviously understand everything so it is very hard on them," Nick Deklyn said. "They love their mother and know what they are losing. We talk about good times and laugh and then sometimes we just cry because we hurt so much. The younger two do not really understand what is happening. They know they sleep at Aunt Sonya's all the time and do not see Mommy anymore. We tell them that Mommy is really sick."The hospital told ABC News that she is "on a good path to get through the pregnancy.""Carrie’s condition is slowly improving, but she’s still critically ill," a spokesperson for the University of Michigan hospital told ABC News. "She is opening her eyes and following commands, like squeezing her hands and wiggling her toes. Our maternal fetal medicine specialists and neurosurgical teams continue to support the DeKlyen family in optimizing care for Carrie and her baby during this difficult situation. We will continue to do everything we can to support them."Nick Deklyen told ABC News that Carrie is "kind and loving to everyone she meets." He said she would cook meals for neighbors, took her kids on picnics and tucked them in every night."I want the world to know that Carrie is truly one of a kind," he said. "She is the most selfless person I have ever met. Her love for Jesus shined through in everything she did. I will miss her so much, but I know we will meet again in heaven when time is done."The couple picked a name for their unborn daughter -- Life -- and Nick Deklyen said he plans to tell her all about Carrie."I will tell her how amazing her mother was," he said. "I will tell her of the great sacrifice that her mom made for her. My kids have been so lucky to call her Mom."
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  • Goodshot/Thinkstock(PESHTIGO, Wisc.) -- A Wisconsin man is lucky to be alive after a nail pierced his heart during a construction accident.While building a frame for a fireplace seven weeks ago, Doug Bergeson was holding a nail gun and accidentally fired a three-and-a-half inch nail into his chest."It didn’t really hurt. It just felt like it kind of stung me," Bergeson told ABC affiliate WBAY-TV.But his work for the day was definitely over.“When I saw [the nail] moving with my heart, it’s kind of like, 'I’m not going to get anything done today,'" he added.Though the small metal spike was sticking out of his chest, Bergeson didn’t bother to call 911. He drove himself 12 miles to Bay Area Medical Center in Marinette."It seemed like the thing to do," Bergeson said. "I felt fine, other than having a little too much iron in my diet."Hospital staff rushed Bergeson to Aurora BayCare Medical Center where he underwent open-heart surgery."A wrong heartbeat, a wrong position and he would have had a much more complicated problem than he was bargaining for," said Dr. Alexander Roitstein, who performed the surgery.Bergeson did not have any permanent damage to heart, just a scar and an appreciation for the power of nail guns."Accidents, they can happen so quickly, and fortunately this one had a good ending," he said.
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