• ABC News(NEW YORK) -- As severe flooding grips Louisiana, harrowing stories of escape from sinking cars have to come light.But this isn't an isolated incident -- an average of 300 people drown in their cars every year.In 2014, ABC News' Matt Gutman -- along with the Indiana State Police -- took part in an escape scenario to explore what to do if you are trapped in a sinking car.Police said the old recommendation was to let the car fill with water before trying to open the door. Now, it's recommended that you get out while the car is on the surface.Police also recommend keeping a sharp object in the car to punch out the windows, and to never use your phone until you're out of the car.Police say you have about 1 minute to open the windows to escape before the water gets above the side windows.
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  • Samir Hussein/WireImage(LONDON) — Princess Kate said she “wouldn’t hesitate” to get “extra support” to protect the mental health of her two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, if they ever need it."No parent would fail to call the doctor if their child developed a fever, yet some children are tackling tough times without the support that can help them because the adults in their life are scared to ask," Kate, 34, said Sunday in a statement of support for a new podcast series on children and mental health. "It doesn’t need to be like this.""Throughout my work with family and child support organisations, one thing that has stood out to me time and again is that getting early support for a child who is struggling to cope is the best possible thing we can do to help our children as they grow up," Kate said in the statement. "Knowing this, both William and I feel very strongly that we wouldn’t hesitate to get expert support for George and Charlotte if they need it."The Duchess of Cambridge spoke out Sunday on behalf of the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, a charity of which she is a patron. The charity is releasing the podcast series, “Child in Mind,” to help parents better understand children’s mental health problems.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorCooking, cleaning and yard work — how you divide the to-do list for these chores, could also hold the secret to a happy marriage.One new theory found that when couples shared similar household tasks instead of adhering to traditional gender stereotyped roles they had a deeper desire for each other. Their conclusion? Contemporary couples who adhere to a more egalitarian division of labor are the only couples who have experienced an increase in sexual frequency compared to their counterparts of the past. In relationships you tend to get stuck in a routine, so mixing things up just keeps things fresh. The other upside? The other person in the partnership is probably doing a lot more than you’re giving them credit for. So by trying it out, you can maybe appreciate what they’re doing a little bit more.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Many parents may unwittingly be placing their babies at increased risk of dying by putting them to sleep in ways that make sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other forms of sleep-related death more likely, according to a small new study published in the journal Pediatrics Monday.Researchers at the Pennsylvania State College of Medicine studied video camera footage of more than 160 infants, which was recorded while they slept.The research was originally aimed at determining new mothers’ preferred sleeping arrangements. But as one of the researchers, Dr. Ian Paul, reviewed the footage, he noticed that in many cases, infants were being put to bed in unsafe ways — such as being placed on their sides or put into cribs full of potentially dangerous items.“I was surprised and alarmed,” said Paul, a professor of pediatrics and public health sciences at Pennsylvania State College.“I’ve been a pediatrician for 18 years. I am not naive to think parents listen to everything, but [the fact that] almost every baby had loose bedding in their sleep environment was surprising to me.”According to the study, even though these parents were aware that they were being recorded in the experiment, more than nine out of 10 of the infants studied were placed in sleep environments with non-recommended, potentially hazardous items that increase the risk of suffocation, including pillows, bumper pads, loose bedding, and stuffed animals.The researchers also found that parents would put the babies on their sides or stomachs, or practice “co-sleeping” — the act of sharing the bed with their infants. These practices, too, put babies at risk of suffocation or injury.The study also found that when infants were moved to a different sleep environment in the middle of the night, babies tended to end up in even more unsafe conditions.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 3,500 U.S. infants die of SIDS every year. To help deal with this problem, the National Institutes of Health launched the Safe to Sleep campaign, which is designed to educate parents on actions they can take to lower their child’s chances of sleep-related death.“There is a lot we can do to reduce the risk a baby will die from SIDS or accidental smothering or strangulation,” said ABC News Chief Health and Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser, also a pediatrician. “The Safe to Sleep campaign has been very successful at reducing the rate of SIDS, but accidental suffocation and strangulation are on the rise.”Besser added that the observation that babies who were moved in the middle of the night tended to be placed in more dangerous situations is important.“I always talk to new parents about putting their babies down to sleep on their backs in a crib that is free from blankets, toys, bumpers, or pillows,” he said. “I think I’ll now add a message about what you do in the middle of the night if your baby wakes up.... You never want to move them to a setting where they will be less safe.” Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A 25-year-old bride who suffered a spinal injury after jumping into a pool was able to walk down the aisle on her own and dance at her wedding.Jaquie Goncher of Marietta, Georgia, was paralyzed from the neck down in 2008 at the age of 17 after she jumped into a friend’s pool. She said she was told by doctors at the time there was “no chance” she would ever walk again, but she was determined to prove them wrong.Goncher worked with physical therapists and in the gym on her own and regained the ability to stand, although only for short periods of time. When she became engaged to her now-husband, Andy Goncher, in August 2015, she set her sights on being able to walk down the aisle on her own and dance at their wedding.“Because of my blood pressure, I couldn’t stand for more than 30 minutes,” Goncher told ABC News. “I knew I’d be able to walk down the aisle with help, but what I really wanted to be able to do was to stand at the wedding and dance at the wedding without the wheelchair.”When the couple tied the knot in Atlanta in May, Goncher accomplished her goal. She walked down the aisle, stood during the ceremony and danced at the wedding reception, all with her wheelchair out of sight.“A few close friends I told but for the most part I wanted it to be a surprise,” Goncher said of her walk down the aisle. “I looked at the ground the entire time because I was so nervous and excited but I know from people that told me that there were a lot of tears.”Goncher’s first dance at her wedding was captured by a live-event painter. The painter, Maggie Smith Kuhn, posted photos of her painting on Reddit, where they have gone viral thanks to their near-exact resemblance to the stunning photographs taken by the wedding photographers.“I’ve never experienced anything like that before,” Kuhn said of being in the reception hall when Goncher and her husband danced. “It was like being at a sports event but times 100 because everyone in the room loved her.”Goncher said the wedding reception was the first time she and her husband had ever danced together. She called it simply “awesome.”“It’s been a really, really long journey with a lot of ups and a lot of downs as well,” she said. “It’s just all been God in my life and leaning on my faith in him.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Jessica Little(ROCKY MOUNT, N.C.) -- A great-great-great grandmother, known to her family and friends as "Ma," celebrated her 100th birthday Saturday and passed along some hilarious tips for living a good life.Dorothy Chandler Collins, born Aug. 13, 1916, was feted by 200 people at Morning Star Baptist Church in Rocky Mount, North Carolina.It wasn't hard to invite hundreds of people to her centennial celebration. Collins and her late husband, Clarence Collins Sr., had 13 children, 51 grandchildren and many great-great and great-great-great grandchildren.Having reached 100, of course Ma had some advice on living -- and it's funny! While getting her makeup done ahead of her party Saturday, ABC News asked Ma to pass along her insights and advice:1. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your 20-year-old self?"I would tell her, 'Tell boys to leave you alone. No boys! You're better off! Because boys make you mad, so you’re better off without a boy.'"2. What’s the most important thing parents need to understand about raising their children?"Be sure they don't grow up too fast."3. What’s the number one thing couples should remember in order to have a successful marriage?"Stay married! Don't be bothered up with anyone else because you’ll lose your husband [or wife]. Young people love too many people and can’t satisfy not one of them!"4. Do you have any regrets?"I wouldn’t have had all these kids!" she quipped. "I know better now."5. What’s the secret to a long life?"God kept me!"Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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