• Courtesy Alisa Bowman(MACUNGIE, Pa.) -- A 12-year-old transgender boy from Pennsylvania recently received a standing ovation and an "overwhelming amount of support" after delivering a powerful speech to his school board in an effort to counter what he saw as hateful and ignorant rhetoric about trans students, according to his mother.Alisa Bowman told ABC News Monday that her son, Ari, gave the speech on Sept. 12, just a few weeks after a fellow student allegedly said she would rather fail gym class than change with transgender students in the locker room."Ari and I really felt like if we didn't speak ... this ignorance and hate would end up winning," she said. "It was incredibly important for my son and I to set the record straight and explain who transgender people are."Bowman recorded Ari's speech to the board on video and uploaded it to Facebook, where it has since gone viral, with 40,000 views as of Monday."Hello, my name is Ari. I'm transgender," Bowman's seventh-grader begins in the video. "You might not know that from the look of me, but I enjoy normal things. I play soccer, I like video games -- just like anybody else."Ari later explains in the video that "the hate the transgender community has been receiving recently has been terrible." He adds that "people say things without an open mind and as if we're not human beings like they are."Ari also addresses the the bathroom and locker room controversy, saying that he changes in the boys' locker room and that he has "seen zero genitalia.""If you think that genitalia will make someone uncomfortable, then think of the story I told earlier about the girls not letting me use the bathroom," he adds, referring to a time in first grade when girls didn't want to let him use the girls' bathroom."They didn’t care that I’ve had female genitalia," he says. "They cared that I looked masculine and was male at heart. They didn’t care about my body parts. What made them uncomfortable was my looks."Toward the end of the speech, Ari says that his life "doesn't revolve around me being transgender. It revolves around my family, my friends, everything I love.""As my mom likes to say, people are afraid of the things that they don’t understand," he adds. "I hope you understand what being transgender means. It doesn’t make me any less or any more. It make me me, and no one can change that."After the speech, Ari got a "loud standing ovation," Bowman told ABC News. She added that she was "really touched" when the superintendent came over to Ari and shook his hand."It was really so beautiful to watch, like watching a baby bird flying out of their nest," Bowman said.Lower Macungie Middle School wrote on Facebook that it was "[s]o proud of our own 7th grader Ari Bowman who spoke with our school board Monday night!"East Penn School District did not immediately respond to ABC News' requests for additional comment.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- High school students who get little physical activity continue not to move enough as they become young adults, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. Researchers followed the physical activity levels of more than 500 10th grade students for four years using accelerometers – devices that measure participants’ daily movement. They found that less than 9 percent of students got the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day, and that those students who got little exercise in 10th grade continued to have low levels of physical activity after graduation. Students who reported planning to exercise were more likely to be physically active, and adolescents were more active during weekdays than they were on weekends. Students whose Body Mass Index (BMI) increased over time had lower levels of physical activity, suggesting that interventions to promote physical activity may be most important for this group. Following the adolescents over time, the researchers found that low levels of physical activity in 10th grade were predictive of low levels of physical activity later on, suggesting that exercise patterns start to solidify during high school.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorUnfortunately for children and parents, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has announced it is not recommending the nasal mist form of the flu vaccine for kids this flu season.This comes on the heels of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that found the mist form of the vaccine was not effective in preventing influenza. To be crystal clear here, the AAP is still recommending that every child above the age of 6 months gets the injectable form of the flu vaccine. My medical take on this: It's a good thing that our country's top doctors are always reevaluating data. In doing so, we can continue to learn in medicine and in science. Please talk to your children's pediatrician about the flu vaccine for this season.
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  • Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A nutrition manager at a Texas elementary school lost more than 100 pounds by simply eating the same foods she encouraged her students to consume for breakfast and lunch."I was 260 pounds and I got a job as a nutrition manager but then I realized I wasn’t very nutritious so I decided to make a change," Tammy McRae said Monday on Good Morning America. "That’s what made me want to lose the weight -- for my kids that I had to inspire to eat better."She added, "I thought, well, let me join them."McRae said she started eating breakfast and lunch from the cafeteria menu at Carver Elementary School in Baytown, Texas, every single day."I just stuck to the menu at our school," McRae said when asked if she made any other lifestyle changes to lose the weight.McRae started out as a dishwasher at the school before being promoted to a manager. It took her around one year to lose the weight and she said it is life-changing."I am now part of my own life," she said. "I go fishing. I mow my own lawn."McRae's advice to others looking for weight loss inspiration?"I just say, for anyone else out there that is thinking of making a change, go for it," she said. "Be a part of your own life."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Federal and state health officials are investigating an outbreak of E. coli that has sickened at least seven people across four states.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that evidence indicates the outbreak likely derived from contaminated beef, veal and bison products produced by Adams Farm Slaughterhouse in Athol, Massachusetts. The company issued a recall on Saturday -- you can see the full list of affected products here.The ill people range in age from 1 to 74, according to the CDC. The cases stem from Connecticut and Massachusetts to Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Five of the seven people infected have been hospitalized.Consumers are urged to throw away any of the affected products or return them to where they were purchased.
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  • Charles Sykes/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- One year after Kim Zolciak-Biermann suffered a stroke, the former "Dancing With the Stars" contestant is opening up about what she's learned from the health scare.While flying home from Los Angeles to Atlanta after a rehearsal with her professional partner, Tony Dovolani, Zolciak-Biermann suffered a transient ischemic attack, also known as a mini-stroke, on Sept. 23, 2015.It forced the reality star to drop out of the ABC reality competition. Zolciak-Biermann tried to return to the ballroom, even launching a petition to be reinstated, to no avail.On Instagram, Zolciak-Biermann, 38, shared a throwback photo of her with Dovolani competing on the ballroom floor and another photo of her in the hospital following the stroke."1 year ago today my life changed. Having a stroke has changed me in so many ways. At 37 I thought I was invincible ..boy was I wrong," she started in a caption."I thank God everyday that I'm still here on this planet," Zolciak-Biermann continued. "I didn't know that would be my last dance however I wasn't feeling that good that day, even @tonydovolani noticed something was off but rather than listen to myself I pushed through. Not smart."The mother of six then opened up about what she learned from the health incident."We have to listen to ourselves, especially us women," she said. "We put our husband and children before us often times and we need to really listen to our bodies. There is (usually) warning signs."Zolciak-Biermann concluded, "[L]isten to your body, it can happen at any age. Love you guys and appreciate all your support! Maybe someday Tony & I will make it back to an All Star [edition]."
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