• Matt Gush/Thinkstock(SAN LUIS OBISPO, Caif) --  A California paramedic school graduate jumped in to help a choking man in a coffee shop where he was awaiting an interview for a nearby ambulance company.
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  • Denise Truscello/WireImage via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- In the latest legal wrangling over the defamation suit Richard Simmons filed against National Enquirer, Radar Online and their parent company American Media, the alleged source behind the reports that Simmons was transitioning genders said in a signed declaration filed Thursday that he never told reporters the fitness guru was becoming a woman.Simmons filed a lawsuit in May over stories claiming that the fitness icon is transitioning from male to female, according to court documents.The media reports that alleged Simmons was changing genders used Mauro Oliveira, Simmons' former masseuse, as their source. Oliveira was also the one who sold photos to a media agency of Simmons dressed in women's clothing, which were used to accompany the stories.In July, the media outlets asked for the lawsuit to be thrown out, arguing in court documents that saying someone is undergoing a gender transition is "not defamatory under modern jurisprudence."Neville Johnson, Simmons' attorney, told ABC News that the National Enquirer "has gone out of its way to try and humiliate and embarrass and slander" Simmons."They have hyped this into a whole other story with all these other details that are simply wrong and false," Johnson added.Simmons' move on Thursday argues the National Enquirer and Radar Online knowingly printed information that was false. Simmons' legal team filed a signed declaration from Oliveira, who claims that he never said that Simmons was transitioning genders."I was shocked and disturbed after discovering that the National Enquirer and Radar Online published cover stories claiming that Richard Simmons has transitioned into a woman and included the photos I supplied," Oliveira stated."Although I may have said that Richard Simmons's chest looks like the chest of someone who might be on hormones," Oliveira's statemend added, "I never stated that Richard Simmons is now a woman, had breast implants, or had sex-change surgery."Johnson told ABC News that Simmons is "doing fine" in the midst of the legal battle."He just is private and he'd like to stay that way," Johnson said. "If he has to come forward and testify and have his body examined, so be it."A spokesperson for American Media told ABC News the company "stands by its reporting.""It’s the height of sophistry to claim to be a supporter of LGBTQ rights, yet also claim to be defamed by being identified as transgender. But that shouldn’t surprise anyone who’s noted Mr. Simmons refusal to identify with or openly support gay and lesbian rights over the course of his entire career," the spokesperson said in a statement. "AMI stands by its reporting, which was not only supported by a lengthy on-the-record taped interview with Mr. Oliveira, it was also supported by photographs and videotape (which AMI possesses but did not publish), and was consistent with prior reporting about Mr. Simmons’ lifestyle. We look forward to litigating Mr. Simmons’ claims in a public court of law."The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Aug. 30.
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  • Laura Stennett Photography(NEW YORK) -- Lauren Ashcraft is refusing to let online shamers get her down after she did a cheeseburger-themed photo shoot with her “adorably chunky” son, Liam.Liam was only 6 pounds, 6 ounces at birth, so she wanted to document “how healthy and perfect he was growing,” Ashcraft told ABC News in an email.Liam and his twin sister, Lola, were born to the Anchorage, Alaska, mom.“Because they were twins, they were small. By 4 months, he was 16 pounds. He fattened up really quick," she added.The results of the cheeseburger-filled shoot were adorable, and at first, the response on social media was “wonderful,” Ashcraft said.But then, “the ‘sanctimommies’ showed up in force,” Ashcraft said, referring to the online commenters who began attacking her son’s weight, health, and her choices as a mom.“It became apparent they were posting Liam's pictures in their private special interest mom groups and having their members come attack everything from me to my son. It made me sick, angry, and most of all sad," she said.It didn’t take long before Ashcraft decided “they would not win.”She scheduled another photo shoot with Liam’s twin sister, Lola, surrounded by healthy organic vegetables.“We wanted them to realize this was all done in good fun and to lighten up!” said Ashcraft.The photographer who did the shoots, Laura Stennett, is also one of Ashcraft’s best friends. She said she was just as offended by the negativity surrounding Liam’s photo shoot and was totally on board to have fun with their creative follow-up.“Instead of letting the naysayers bully us into taking the photos down, and instead of wasting hours of our lives combatting their comments with responses -- engaging them only made it worse -- we decided to do the veggie smash with his twin sister Lola,” Stennett told ABC News in an email.Ashcraft said her photo shoots were “done in good fun” and “the rest doesn’t matter.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- New research from a statewide survey in Arizona may hold true for the rest of the country. Parents seem to understand that football can cause serious concussions, which in turn could cause serious long-term neurological damage. But they are missing the memo when it comes to the risks associated with other contact sports.Soccer and cheerleading also have high rates of concussion, according to researchers at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Arizona, a leading institution in studying concussions.In a new survey conducted by the group in Arizona, 85 percent of parents said they would permit their children to participate in "any contact sport." That number is up from 69 percent of parents in a similar survey from 2014.The survey reports that while only two-thirds of parents said they would allow their child to play football, nine of 10 parents were fine with letting their kids take part in soccer, even though girls’ soccer has the highest rates of concussion of any teen sport.“The greatest rise of that participation is actually in girls’ sports,” Dr. Javier Cardenas, director of the Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center, said in a press conference Thursday. “The No. 1 increase is actually in cheer."Cardenas added that because there are fewer girls involved in high-level cheerleading, the absolute number of cheerleading concussions is low.Alexa Caiazzo of Gilbert, Arizona, was a cheerleader who said she had experienced a concussion.“I couldn’t read. I couldn’t write. I couldn’t even have a light on in the house,” Alexa Caiazzo, 16, told ABC News.Alexa Caiazzo said she was treated at the Barrow Institute after suffering three concussions, which ended her seven years as a cheerleader.“I had extremely bad pain in my legs,” she said. “My headaches got progressively worse, and I slept 15 to 20 hours a day.”Alexa Caiazzo’s mom, Lisa Caiazzo, said that after Alexa's third concussion, she decided it was time to pull both of her daughters out of the sport."It was really hard,” Lisa Caiazzo said while fighting back tears. “To tell her that you are done was the worst thing I think I ever had to say to my kids. I knew it took a while for football to get those helmet laws into place, and now I think it’s time for cheer.”At first, Alexa Caiazzo said she didn’t realize she was experiencing concussion symptoms, but she now hopes kids will become more aware of what to look for to determine if they have a concussion.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • MyLoupe/UIG via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A new study may spell hope for millions who suffer from peanut allergies.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Researchers may now be able to detect Lyme disease in its earliest stages and differentiate it from other tick-borne ailments with similar symptoms, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine.The new research is creating a buzz within the medical community, as one of the major setbacks when it comes to properly diagnosing Lyme disease is that it can appear very similar to other ailments spread by ticks, including Southern tick-associated rash illness (often dubbed STARI). In addition, current Lyme disease tests available often produce unreliable results within the first four to six weeks of infection.Researchers looked at blood samples of people who were both confirmed positive for Lyme disease and the samples of a set who were confirmed positive for STARI. By examining the molecular features of both sets, they were able to create a model that detected Lyme disease cases more accurately than standard diagnostic tests."We were able to tell the difference between early Lyme disease and Southern tick-associated rash illness by using biomarkers that show us how the body reacts to these illnesses," John Belisle, a professor at Colorado State University and one of the authors of the study said in a statement. "This could be important in helping to more accurately detect early Lyme disease, which is crucial because the longer people wait for Lyme disease treatment, the higher the potential risk for having more severe symptoms."Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 300,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year, according to studies conducted by the CDC. Most cases in the U.S. occur in the Northeast and Midwest.Symptoms of untreated Lyme disease includes facial palsy, severe headaches, episodes of dizziness, problems with short-term memory and nerve pain, according to the CDC.
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