• Tim Smith(FAIRFAX, Va.) — A Virginia baseball player was saved when his teammate administered CPR moments after he was struck in the chest by a baseball.The Manassas baseball team was practicing for the Southeast Regional Tournament on July 14 when the catcher threw the ball and hit Steve Smith directly in the chest, according to Steve's father Tim."His heart stopped immediately," Smith said, who is also the team's coach. "When you get struck in the chest and there is about three hundredths of a second in between each heartbeat and basically if you are hit by something in that time, at the right speed, it stops your heart."Smith said the whole team ran toward his son as he collapsed on the field."When I got to him he was stiff, like his body was trying to breathe but his eyes were rolled back in his head, and he wasn't responding," Smith recalled. "He was basically gone, I guess. He wouldn't wake up, he wouldn't respond. I was shaking him, trying to get him to take a breath. I yelled, 'Does anyone know CPR?'"That's when Paul Dow, 17, came forward and immediately started performing CPR. Meanwhile, a parent on the sidelines called 911.Smith said he was "walking around trying to stay calm, but not doing a very good job" as Paul performed CPR on his son.Eventually Smith put his son and Paul, who was still performing CPR, in the back of his truck and drove them to the parking lot, where an ambulance arrived soon after.EMS workers pulled out a defibrillator and were able to restart Steve's heart. Smith said 12 minutes had lapsed between the time Paul began administering CPR and when emergency workers successfully revived Steve.Steve was then airlifted to a trauma hospital in Fairfax, where he stayed over the weekend, remaining mostly unconscious.Smith said his son woke up on Sunday asking, "What's for breakfast?" and "What am I doing here?" He had no memory of what happened to him."If you look at him you'd never know that anything happened. He has a hole in his neck where they put the tube and a few nicks on his arms but other than that he doesn't have a scratch on his body," Smith said. "It's a miracle."Paul, a close friend of the Smiths, learned CPR to become a lifeguard at the local pool. He received his certification just a few months ago.Smith said his son's recovery was a miracle."Thanks be to God that Paul was there to give the CPR because there would have been brain damage at the very least if he didn't get air. God has his hand on it the whole way," Smith said."He added that another family friend, who is a retired firefighter, was inspired to start a CPR class in the community after Steve's near-death experience. "There is so much good coming out of this, for the little bit of suffering we did, so much good is coming out of it," Smith said. Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Courtesy Layla Luciano(NEW YORK) -- Layla Luciano is a New York City-based fitness trainer known for her high-intensity and exhilarating workouts. Luciano uses her 20 years of martial arts training to design workouts that activate both slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers, ensuring a complete body burning and calorie-torching workout.
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  • ABC News (NEW YORK) — Everyone has his or her own way of achieving body-image acceptance. ABC News correspondent Mara Schiavocampo and her sister Pia Schiavo-Campo arrived at their goals through different methods.The two women appeared on Good Morning America on Monday to discuss how they found happiness by pursuing their own fitness goals: Mara lost 90 pounds through diet and exercise, as chronicled in her book Thinspired, while Pia chose to love her 230-pound frame as is. She writes about body acceptance in her blog Chronicles of a Mixed Fat Chick.The sisters wrote a joint blog for their GMA appearance. Read below for more of their take on their personal fitness goals.Mara and Pia Talk Self-AcceptanceLike so many women, our path to self-love and acceptance has been a rocky one. We’ve both gone through more than our fair share of fad diets and periods of feeling bad about ourselves. But we’ve come out of that journey stronger and happier than ever. Here are some of the ways we stay focused on body positivity and true self-care.MARABest AdviceBe kind to yourself. Tend to your true needs. When you’re tired, rest. When you’re sad, cry. When you’re thirsty, drink. Taking care of yourself makes you feel and look better.Personal Mantra“I am strong.” I’m not getting strong. I’m not feeling strong. I am strong. Right now.Most Rejuvenating ExerciseRunning. I actually strongly dislike running, but nothing makes me feel better than when I’m finished. It fills me with energy and endorphins, and makes my body feel relaxed and powerful.PIABest AdviceStay away from despair and compare, and focus on yourself. We’re all different, and what one body needs is very different from what another body needs. You have to seek your own happy place.Personal Mantra“I am enough.” No matter where you are, by the very virtue of your existence and humanity, you are enough.Most Rejuvenating ExerciseI love downward facing dog. It feels so good on my back and my legs. I love pigeon pose too. It allows my hips to open up a lot which feels great.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you’re going to binge on an entire season of your favorite show, try to work in some light exercise between episodes.According to a Japanese study released Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers found sedentary behavior -- like watching too much TV -- can contribute to death by blood clot. Researchers at the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine followed more than 86,000 middle-aged to older adults for 20 years, starting in 1988. The included participants reported their daily TV viewing and other lifestyle factors. People fell into three groups: those who watched fewer than 2.5 hours a day, between 2.5 and 4.9 hours a day, and five or more hours a day.Researchers also collected causes of death from participants who died. During the course of the study, 59 people died of a pulmonary embolism, or a blood clot in the lung. Putting together the data, researchers determined a pulmonary embolism was 70 percent more likely to be the cause of death for moderate TV viewers, rising by 40 percent for each additional two hours of TV-watching. People who watched the most daily TV were 2.5 times more likely to be killed by a clot in their lungs.Too much sitting and other sedentary behavior causes blood clots form in large veins in the leg. If the clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, that's a pulmonary embolism, which can kill you nearly instantly, if it's serious enough. Chest pain, sudden shortness of breath and cough are some classic signs of a pulmonary embolism.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorGet ready to play doctor with Google's symptom search.The tech titan's new feature gives you a more accurate list of health conditions when searching for specific symptoms. It's basically a more sophisticated search engine for symptoms, and increased education is always a good thing. But there are some limitations here. The practice of medicine involves a lot more than plugging a few symptom words in the computer. Doctors and healthcare professionals use judgment and clinical experience, along with a physical exam at times, to make a real diagnosis. Although every search will likely end with the advice to see your doctor, remember that sometimes more is not better. Sometimes the testing or intervention can actually be worse than the original symptoms.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Courtesy Zach Skow(NEW YORK) -- While his rescue may have been “typical”, Hooch is far from a run-of-the-mill dog.When Marley’s Mutts Dog Rescue took the dog from a shelter three years ago, he weighed half of what he does now and was suffering from a bad case of pneumonia. His ears had been sheared off, leaving him with an infection. But all of this seemed minor once the veterinarian finally opened Hooch’s mouth and made a horrifying discovery -– his tongue had been removed.Hooch had been a victim of severe abuse, and some of Marley’s Mutts’ social media followers urged the rescue organization to euthanize the dog, but founder Zach Skow immediately recognized Hooch’s capacity to persevere and lead a normal life.“We don’t treat him specially and we don’t enable him to feel sorry for himself, which is how he’s become such an incredible dog,” Skow told ABC News of his beloved canine. Skow eventually adopted Hooch from his rescue, and now refers to him as both his spirit-animal and his wingman.Hooch’s lack of tongue made eating nearly impossible, but through experimentation and determination, Skow and his team developed an effective technique. To feed Hooch, Skow pours hot water over dry food, rolls it into a ball, and places it in the back of his mouth.“It's the most therapeutic thing. If you’re feeling lost inside of yourself or feeling sorry for yourself -- all those things that tend to happen to us because of the rigors of life -- if you take the time to feed Hooch, nothing will snap you out of your [rut] like feeding that dog,” Skow said, noting the perspective his dog provides.Staying cool is also a challenge for Hooch, since dogs rely on panting to regulate their body temperature. And though less detrimental to his health, Hooch’s tongueless mouth is also defenseless against drool.But perhaps most remarkable of all the obstacles Hooch has overcome, is how he has managed to put his trauma behind him and embrace people.“He could choose to have [his past] control him, but he doesn’t,” Skows said of his dog's admirable aptitude for people. “He’s a powerful reminder to get out of your pity party and to live.”Though he is not an officially certified therapy dog, Hooch and Skow take regular trips to local organizations where Hooch works with autistic children, the homeless, and other individuals who could use some canine companionship.Skow notes that Hooch is especially good with nonverbal autistic children -– a particularly difficult task for most dogs -– because he is able to stay calm when the kids get excited and can adapt to the abnormal body language. His connections with the children are so powerful, in fact, that one of the nonverbal children even began saying Hooch’s name, according to Skows.Hooch’s work with the community has recently earned him the coveted Emerging Heroes Award from the American Humane Society.“He’s a testament to how we all ought to live,” Skows said. “A lot of times we search for examples of how to be resilient, and he’s a living, breathing, drooling example of that.”
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