• iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorWhen it comes to bread, do you prefer white or wheat? According to new research, the type you choose may influence how long you live.Harvard researchers found that the more whole grains people ate, the lower the risk was of dying early from various causes. In people who followed current dietary guidelines -- about 50 grams of whole grains per day -- they found death from heart disease went down 20 percent and death from cancer dropped 15 percent. For something to be whole grain, it means that 100 percent of the original kernel must be present. Rich in magnesium, zinc, vitamin E and fiber, whole grains can be an important part of a healthy, balanced diet.
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  • Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic(NEW YORK) -- Khloe Kardashian is opening up about her own frightening health scare.The 32-year-old reality star revealed on her app that doctors found and removed a cancerous mole on her back. She's now urging fans to check their skin regularly."There was one mole I had on my back that was skin cancer," Kardashian shared. "I had 8 inches of skin removed. It was definitely painful because it was a lot of skin, but most of the time, the removals haven't been that bad."She added: "I haven't had a problem in years, but wanted to share my experience with you so that if you notice something doesn't look right, you will take action and take care of your health!"According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S., and the American Cancer Society notes that more than five million cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancers are diagnosed each year.Dermatologist Rosemarie Ingleton stopped by ABC News' Good Morning America Wednesday to discuss the disease.Ingleton said people with increased sun exposure and who have more moles on their bodies are more susceptible to skin cancer."The more moles you have, the more things you have that can become abnormal," she said. "So people who have a lot of moles, especially slightly weird moles, are at increased risk for getting melanoma, specifically."Ingleton said everyone should check their own bodies at least once a month and see a dermatologist annually.Moles that are considered normal will appear round, even-colored and contain no irregularities on the edges, she added.To prevent skin cancer, Ingleton suggests wearing sunscreen year-round, hats and anything that helps protect against sun exposure.
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  • Courtesy Pasquale Pat Brocco(AVONDALE, Ariz.) — An Arizona man who threw out all of his food and committed himself to walking to the local Walmart and back every time he wanted a meal has lost more than 300 pounds.Pasquale “Pat” Brocco, 31, began to change his life three years ago when he was warned by his doctor that his weight of 605 pounds and his high blood pressure and high cholesterol put his life in serious danger.Brocco went home from that appointment, where he said his doctor warned him he might die, and took a photo of himself in front of a mirror.“My stomach was down to my thighs. My chest was hanging down here,” Brocco told ABC News, pointing to his stomach. “I was disgusted.”The Avondale man decided that every time he was hungry he would walk the one mile to his closest Walmart and the one mile back home to eat his meal. In less than two years, Brocco said he lost 200 pounds.“You walk to Walmart three times a day and you end up walking six miles,” he said. “It’s amazing because I never walked six miles in my life and I was doing it every day.”Brocco put foods like vegetables, meats, sweet potatoes, quinoa and steel cut oatmeal into his diet and took out the specific foods he learned over time were hampering his efforts.“Once I figured out dairy was my downfall, I took it out of my diet and instantly I started losing weight again,” Brocco said.Brocco graduated from walks to Walmart to incline walks on a treadmill at a gym. He also began lifting weights and using gym equipment he previously could not.“I mean, at 600 pounds I couldn’t even go to the gym,” Brocco said. “I didn’t fit on the machines.”Now 330 pounds lighter, Brocco said his nickname is no longer “Fat Pat.” As “Possible Pat,” he hopes to be a role model for his 1-year-old son.“I’m setting an example for my son so he can be ‘Possible Pat’ too,” Brocco said, in tears.Because he lost so much weight he had to have about 30 pounds of excess skin removed. Brocco underwent the surgery on Monday and is now recovering at home. The procedure was performed by Dr. Remus Repta, a plastic surgeon.Below is Brocco's pre- and post-weight loss diet for a typical day:Before weight loss: About 11,228 total calories per day.Box of cerealWhole milk, one-half gallon1 package peanut butter cups1 candy barMeatball and cheese submarine sandwich (12 inch)100 fast food chicken nuggets1 fast food apple pie1 fast food milkshake2 liters of soda4 doughnuts from a local gas stationAfter weight loss: About 2,260 total calories per day.2 gallons of waterAbout 20 egg whites1 cup of oatmeal24 oz chicken breastGreen beans6 oz ground lean bison32 almondsHalf a sweet potatoCopyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MIAMI) -- Since a local outbreak of Zika virus was reported in Florida last month, health officials have been going door-to-door to test residents, spraying to control infected mosquitoes and trying to alert the public about the possibility of mosquito infection.Yet, the number of cases has continued to increase. On Monday, three new cases were reported in Florida, bringing the total number of people infected during the outbreak to 30.Though this may look concerning at first, experts say increasing numbers do not necessarily mean the outbreak is getting worse. It could be a sign that health officials are doing what they should to stop the outbreak. Their first priority is to find those infected."It’s paradoxical. The reasons we’re finding other cases is that the system is working very well," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told ABC News. "Expectations have to be tempered with the reality -- namely this is both a mosquito borne virus and a sexually transmitted virus."Schaffner said since 80 percent of people with Zika don't have symptoms, that can prolong the time it takes to identify new cases -- especially as more people request testing from their doctors or are tested by health department officials canvassing neighborhoods.Schaffner also said it's key for the health department to alter their approach if needed. The decision by Florida officials to conduct aerial insecticide spraying shows how they were able to change mosquito control tactics when the Aedes aegypti mosquito proved hard to kill, for instance.At this point, the Florida Health Department has tested more than 3,300 people statewide since late last year when the Zika virus outbreak in South America first raised alarm. At least 440 people have been diagnosed with travel-related Zika and another 30 contracted the virus locally during this outbreak. Officials believe all active transmission of the virus is still limited to the same less-than-one-square-mile area of northern Miami called Wynwood. The area is home to many restaurants and businesses."We cannot expect that we can run in and flip a switch and say 'Oh, OK the outbreak is over,'" Schaffner said, acknowledging the challenges of the Florida health department.Health officials will likely look at Dengue fever for a framework for how long the Zika outbreak could last, Dr. Stephen Morse, an infectious disease expert at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, told ABC News. The Dengue fever virus is in the same family of viruses as the Zika virus and spread by the same mosquito, although it causes different symptoms and is not sexually transmitted."If Dengue is any indication it will wind down in a few weeks to months," said Morse, emphasizing that researchers are still learning about the Zika virus every day.The current outbreak will give more insight about how to fight future outbreaks, he said, especially how to best reach out to community members and how to control the Aedes aegypti mosquito with pesticide.
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  • Photodisc/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorA few months back, Bethenny Frankel revealed it was a fibroid issue that forced her to scale back her screen time during this season of The Real Housewives of New York City. For those who don't know, fibroids are benign tumors of the uterine muscle and are incredibly common.If you're told you have fibroids, you should ask where they are located. Some are in the muscle, while others, called subserosal fibroids, are on the outer surface. Fibroids that grow into the uterine cavity are called submucosal and they typically are the cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. There are numerous treatment options for fibroids depending on your age, desire for future childbearing, and the size and location of the fibroids. You should talk to your gynecologist about all the options, including uterine fibroid embolization (UFE), which is performed by a radiologist.
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  • Instagram/kolbtron(NEW YORK) -- This adventurous mama has no problem hanging 10 at 40 weeks pregnant.Kolby Fahlsing, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, is going viral for her wakesurfing skills despite being overdue for the birth of her baby boy.“My mom was in town and I was just waiting for baby to come and I thought, ‘I might as well, I feel fine,’” Fahlsing, 32, told ABC News. “I wanted to see if I could do it and it’s a stress reliever for me. It gets my mind off things.”The proud new mama said wakesurfing is a hobby she loves to do.“I think if I didn’t live in Minnesota and could surf more I’d love to do it professionally,” she explained. “I’m a business owner as well so I don’t have time to do it as much as I’d like.”Although the wakesurfing didn’t induce labor immediately, Fahlsing’s brand new bundle of joy was born five days later on Aug. 10.“He kicks when he’s out there because I’m having fun and my hips are moving a little bit,” she said of the water sport. “I don’t think it helped because I had to be induced and I was in labor for three days. This was my first child and I was in labor for three days but I only pushed for an hour. My abs were really strong and when things were going on, my doctors were like, ‘This is insane.’”Fahlsing said wakesurfing is not dangerous for the baby as the boat is moving at a slow speed and the exercise is low-impact.“People confuse wakesurfing with wakeboarding or water-skiing or tubing,” she explained. “With wakeboarding you’re going maybe going 25 miles an hour. And wakesurfing you’re going 9 or 10. And it’s behind a wakesurf boat. It’s specially designed to wakesurf. People might not understand that we’re being very safe and you’re going pretty slow and it’s low-impact. If I were to fall, it would be like jumping into the pool.”The new mommy, who underwent in vitro fertilization to get pregnant, can’t get enough of her brand new baby boy named Wilder.“He’s pretty amazing. I was told I’d never get pregnant ever and so it’s still pretty surreal,” she said. “He’s got really long hair so he’s my little surfer baby.”
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