• iStock/Thinkstock(HONOLULU) -- A 25-year-old man suffered serious injuries in a shark attack in Hawaii on Saturday morning, according to authorities.The attack occurred at 9:30 a.m., according to the Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources.Officials on the Big Island were forced to close down Kukio Beach following the attack. Kukio Beach is located on the Kona Coast near Hualalai and is a popular tourist area, located near the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai and Hualalai Golf Course.Hawaii ABC affiliate KITV reported that the man suffered multiple injuries to his hand and leg.Public beach access remained closed for the rest of Saturday, and KITV reported that a decision on whether to open the beaches on Sunday would not be made until morning. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- An Ohio bride surprised her dad on her wedding day by paying tribute to their special relationship.Before Morgan Gompf walked down the aisle to her now-husband, Greg, on June 25, 2016, in front of 250 guests, she took a moment to greet her father."I knew I always needed a moment with him before the wedding," the bride told ABC News.What Rick, who asked ABC News not to use his last name, didn't know was that his youngest daughter had a surprise for him.Gompf, 26, had taken Rick's blue-and-black flannel shirt and had it stitched on the inside of her wedding dress. The touching "something blue" that Gompf wore made Rick, 60, break down into tears, which was captured in photos that recently went viral."Growing up on the farm, he always just threw on a flannel before we would go outside to do chores," Gompf said, "and he had a flannel that he always wore, which was blue and black checkered."Her father still loves farming, and currently has livestock, horses, cattle and "every farm animal under the sun" on his current farm in Central Ohio.Photographer Erika Brooke, who took the photos, told ABC News she loves the father-daughter moments at weddings because "a lot of the time, it gets overlooked or downplayed, but it’s always been my favorite moments of the whole day."Brooke, who's been professionally shooting weddings for six years, said she didn't know what to expect when Gompf went outside on the venue's back porch to greet her father for the first time."It was just immediate tears for me," she said. "Because I remember that moment with my dad, with my dad giving me away."The bride added that her father had no idea she had used the moment to honor him."When I showed it to him, it was pretty emotional for him and for me," she said of her touching surprise. "We realized -- without it being spoken -- how important our relationship was as a father-daughter relationship."Gompf, who credits Rick with her love of the outdoors and farming, added that she and her dad are "probably best buddies in every sense."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • TongRo Images/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- A California judge ruled that coffee companies are required by law to carry a cancer warning label due to a chemical compound that develops when the beans are roasted at high temperatures.According to court documents, Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle said that coffee companies failed to show that there was not a significant health risk from a carcinogen in coffee."While plaintiff offered evidence that consumption of coffee increases the risk of harm to the fetus, to infants, to children and to adults, defendants' medical and epidemiology experts testified that they had no opinion on causation," Berle wrote. "Defendants failed to satisfy their burden of proving ... that consumption of coffee confers a benefit to human health."The Council for Education and Research on Toxics, a non-profit organization, sued Starbucks and several other companies that distribute coffee in 2010. The organization claimed in the lawsuit that those companies violated state laws that require them to post warnings about acrylamide exposure from coffee.The National Coffee Association (NCA) responded to the long-standing case, saying the labels would be confusing to consumers."Cancer warning labels on coffee would be misleading. The U.S. government’s own Dietary Guidelines state that coffee can be part of a healthy lifestyle," the NCA said in a press release. "The World Health Organization(WHO) has said that coffee does not cause cancer."The judge gave Starbucks and other defendants until April 10 to file objections to the proposed ruling.Starbucks, which is a member of the association, told ABC News to refer to the NCA response for comment.What do you need to know about acrylamide?ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton joined "Good Morning America" to explain what acrylamide is and how it could potentially affect consumers."It is not an ingredient but a by-product that's formed in the roasting or baking process," she clarified of the carcinogen.The National Cancer Institute (NCI) lists coffee as one of the major food sources of acrylamide, along with potato chips, crackers, bread, cookies, breakfast cereals, canned black olives and prune juice.The presence of acrylamide is not currently regulated in food, but it is regulated in drinking water and some materials that come into contact with food. The NCI reports that, in terms of cancer, a "large number" of studies in humans have found "no consistent evidence that dietary acrylamide exposure is associated with the risk of any type of cancer.""The World Health Organization has determined that acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen," Dr. Ashton said. "But, remember, when talking about a toxin you need either a very potent toxin or a high frequency or a very large dose and when you're talking about coffee. Obviously, the concern is the high frequency."Other medical literature and studies have previously shown "clear and massive associations" between coffee and improved health. Dr. Ashton said some of the health benefits include, "Reduced risk of certain types of cancer like skin cancer, liver cancer, a reduced risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Parkinson's, the list goes on and on."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Trump administration will no longer automatically exempt pregnant women from detention in ICE cases, the agency has announced, and critics are calling the move "an egregious human rights offense."In a directive issued in December 2017, ICE Acting Director Thomas Homan superseded his previous memo to ensuring that "pregnant detainees in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody for immigration violations are identified, monitored, tracked and house in an appropriate facility," officials told reporters Thursday.Since the policy was signed in December of 2017, ICE has had 506 pregnant detainees, and currently have 35 in custody.Pregnant detainees are now treated like every other person that ICE detains, the acting director said on a conference call, adding that each case is evaluated on an individual basis.Prenatal care is available to the women in ICE custody, Homan said, noting that standard practice dictates all women between the ages of 15 to 56 take a urine pregnancy test. Pregnant women have access to an offsite OBGYN within their first seven days of detention.ICE officials also said that they are just following direction from the President.Critics called the new policy "an egregious human rights offense.""Detention creates serious health risks, and many women have medical needs that cannot typically be addressed in a detention setting," the American Immigration Lawyers Association and American Immigration Council said in a joint statement Thursday.Together with several other advocacy groups, including the ACLU, AILA and AIC in September filed a complaint decrying "the lack of quality medical care provided to women who are pregnant or have suffered miscarriages while in custody."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Developing confidence and "creating a speak-up culture among girls is essential in the #MeToo era," according to an author of a new book that shares actionable ways girls can develop and spread confidence."There is no quality more essential and yet maddeningly out of reach for teen girls today than confidence," Claire Shipman, co-author of The Confidence Code for Girls with Katty Kay, told Good Morning America.Confidence is "critical for resilience, success, satisfaction and happiness," she added. Yet as girls grow up, especially at around the time they reach adolescence, they "aren't building confidence as well as boys are.""Even though girls are scaling great academic and intellectual heights," Shipman said, "they also become mired in rumination, people-pleasing, perfectionism and anxiety."Social media contributes to that "quagmire," Shipman said, as it can result in the "dizzying escalation of social conflicts and drama; the ever-present comparisons to other kids posting only the most polished, airbrushed images; and the addiction to the dopamine rush of getting 'likes' and followers."#CaptureConfidence campaignInstagram has partnered with GMA and the authors of The Confidence Code for Girls to launch a campaign to fight back against and use social media as a tool to spread and develop confidence for girls. The #CaptureConfidence campaign encourages girls to share images that express their true, most confident selves.Whether that be through sharing photos of activism work you take pride in or just sharing a selfie embracing your natural hair, the new campaign encourages participants to share snapshots of confidence in all its forms, with the hashtag #CaptureConfidence. On Wednesday, GMA will feature some of the images on the show and on GMA social channels.Instagram tapped five women who are using the platform to inspire their communities and raise awareness about important issues to express their unique and confident selves in a photo shoot.The key ways girls can create confidence is by "taking risks, dealing with failure and embracing authenticity," Shipman said.In the book, the authors developed a mantra, dubbed the "A Confident Girl's Manifesto," that they recommend reading along to at least once a week to help develop confidence."When the focus is on showing their confidence, showing themselves feeling confident -- not pretty or perfect," Shipman said, "girl strength will spread exponentially." Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MONTREAL) -- Could watching a hockey game increase your risk of having a heart attack?That’s the question researchers in Canada have tried to answer in a new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology Thursday.The researchers’ goal was to analyze hospital admissions to the Montreal Heart Institute between 2010 and 2014 to see whether more patients were treated for heart attacks when the city’s ice hockey team, the Montreal Canadiens, played a match.Although admissions for heart attacks didn’t change on the day of a hockey game, the researchers found it did increase -- just a bit -- the day after a game. But not everyone was skating on thin ice; the effect was only seen in men below the age of 55. Both older men and women appear to be immune to the hockey effect.While hockey fans may say their hearts are broken when their team loses, the research shows the opposite. Hospital admission rates increased most when the team won a match at home. After home wins, there was a 40 percent increase in hospital admissions among men under the age of 55.How do the scientists explain the findings?They suggest that the emotional stress of watching a hockey game could cause increased stress on the heart, triggering an event such as a heart attack.“The Montreal Canadiens is known for its extremely loyal and enthusiastic fan base. This historical role of the city of Montreal might explain in part the association” said Dr. Hung Q. Ly, the study’s lead investigator and an interventional cardiologist at the Montreal Heart Institute.Research published last year showed that spectators’ heart rates more than doubled while watching a hockey game. This was most pronounced when watching a game in person compared to on television.But this latest research is more puzzling. Neither overtime losses nor shootout wins changed the rate of hospital admissions, suggesting the extra heart attacks might not be caused by the stress of watching a game alone.Importantly, the findings only show an association between hockey games and admission rates, so it’s not known whether watching hockey games actually caused any of the health problems in the study. A number of other factors including alcohol consumption, drug-taking and sleep deprivation -- all of which could be related to a hockey game -- might be responsible instead.In fact, we don’t even know how many of the 2,199 patients who suffered a heart attack in the study were actual hockey enthusiasts who recently watched a game.The study, published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, builds on similar research from other sports events across the world. In England, for example, researchers found that the rates of heart attack increased after the national soccer team was knocked out of the 1998 World Cup.But, perhaps, different fans experience different effects when watching a sport. When the French national team played in the same competition, the number of heart attacks decreased in the country.It’s still too early to tell whether watching a sports game has any effect on our health. For now, doctors will have to put the idea on ice before making any recommendations to patients. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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