• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK CITY) -- Men are from Mars and women are a little more down to earth, apparently.Male college students are more likely to think of themselves as smarter than they actually are, while women are more realistic at judging their place in the academic universe, according to new research from Arizona State University.A man with an average GPA was likely to say that they were smarter than 66 percent of their class. For a woman with an average GPA, this figure was only 54 percent.Men were also more than three times more likely than women to say they were smarter than the classmate they worked with most closely.The study, published in the journal Advances in Physiology Education, looked at data collected from 202 students enrolled in a college physiology class. The model allowed the researchers to make adjustments for each student’s GPA depending on the difficulty of classes they took, so that the effect of gender on the students’ perceptions could be identified.Katelyn Cooper, one of the researchers behind the study, was inspired to investigate the phenomenon after working with students as an academic adviser.“I would ask how their classes were going and noticed a trend. Women would tell me they were afraid that other students thought they were stupid," she said in a press release. "I never heard this from the men in those same biology classes." Although the data was taken from just one class at a single institution, the findings could impact how professors teach.“As we transition more of our courses into active learning classes where students interact closely with each other, we need to consider that this might influence how students feel about themselves and their academic abilities,” said Sarah Brownell, an author of the study and assistant professor at the school.“This study shows women are disproportionately thinking they are not as good as other students."Brownell worries that women may choose not to continue training in science due to a belief that they are not smart enough.Although it wasn't clear if the results were specific to science subjects, they do mirror findings produced elsewhere. Previous research has identified that both ethnicity and LGBTQ identity can influence how students rate their own ability, as well as gender."This is not an easy problem to fix," Cooper added. "It's a mindset that has likely been ingrained in female students since they began their academic journeys.”However, she suggested that teachers could make some changes.“We can start by structuring group work in a way that ensures everyone's voices are heard, to help [students] take a more equitable approach to group work," she added.The researchers also asked students how they reached a judgment about their intelligence compared to the rest of their class.The students most commonly reported observing who answered the most questions in class and judging who seemed to know the most course material. Only 8.9 percent of the students mentioned the ability to think outside of the box when assessing how smart somebody was.Overall, 71 percent of the students believed they were in the smartest half of their class. This suggests that on the whole, college students overestimate their own intelligence in comparison to their classmates. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Monkey Business/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A woman is suing a fertility doctor who she claims used his own sperm to impregnate her mother, instead of that of the specifically chosen college student donor.Kelli Rowlette submitted a DNA sample to Ancestry.com back in July 2017, according to the federal lawsuit she and her parents, Howard Fowler and Sally Ashby, filed last week in Idaho's federal court.The results showed something Rowlette did not expect: that she and a man named Dr. Gerald Mortimer shared a parent-child relationship, the lawsuit states. But Rowlette had never heard of Mortimer and "initially she believed the Ancestry.com results were in error," according to the lawsuit.Rowlette approached her mother, Ashby, to share the "confusing results," the lawsuit states. Ashby recognized Mortimer's name and "was devastated." She told Fowler, her now-ex-husband, and he too was "devastated," according to the lawsuit.The parents conceived their daughter with the help of Mortimer, an OB-GYN, after they approached him at Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates in Idaho Falls, Idaho, regarding their reproductive difficulties, according to the lawsuit. Mortimer recommended a procedure in which 85 percent of Fowler's sperm was mixed with 15 percent from another anonymous donor in order to "increase the chances of conception," the lawsuit states.Fowler and Ashby agreed, but only if the donor was a college student with characteristics similar to those of Fowler, according to the lawsuit. Mortimer told them he had access to sperm that matched the requirements, the lawsuit states.But when he performed the procedure, Mortimer instead allegedly used his own sperm to impregnate Ashby, according to the lawsuit, "falsely" representing it as that of Fowler and the donor.For months after Rowlette approached them, the parents struggled with whether to tell their daughter who Mortimer was, the lawsuit states. But, before they could act, Rowlette learned the doctor was her biological father when she discovered her birth certificate, which "had been signed by Dr. Mortimer."Rowlette was "horrified," the lawsuit states.Had either Ashby or Fowler known that Mortimer was going to use his own sperm, according to the lawsuit, "they would not have agreed to the procedure."The lawsuit alleges that Mortimer knew Rowlette was his daughter but did not tell Ashby or Fowler.The basis for this claim? When the family moved from Idaho Falls, Ashby told Mortimer they were relocating to Washington state and he became emotional, according to the lawsuit."Dr. Mortimer cried when Ms. Ashby informed him they were moving," according to the lawsuit. "... Mortimer fraudulently and knowingly concealed his use of his own genetic material in the Procedure."Rowlette and her parents are suing Mortimer, his wife, Linda G. McKinnon Mortimer, and Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates.Attempts to reach Mortimer, who has since retired, were unsuccessful.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Nearly one in 100 babies are born with a heart condition -- and a new study says that their mothers may have a higher risk of their own heart problems.A study of more than 1 million moms found that those raising children with heart problems were more likely to be hospitalized themselves for heart disease -- 25 percent more likely than other mothers of the same age.If the child’s heart defect was categorized as “critical,” it was even worse for moms, with a 43 percent higher rate of hospitalization. These moms were more than twice as likely to have a heart attack. Additionally, mothers in this “critical” group even had higher risk of requiring a heart transplant for severe heart disease.What is the connection?The researchers aren’t sure of the connection yet. It’s possible that undiscovered genetic factors which end up causing problems with the baby’s developing heart may also make the mom’s heart more prone to disease. Additionally, stress chemicals released in response to problems during pregnancy may cause long term effects on mom’s heart.Could the stress and exhaustion of raising a sick child possibly be a reason?Parenting a sick child leads to years of added stress which may have a physical impact on the parent. Prior research showed that raising infants with heart conditions, with costly and emotionally draining hospitalizations, is associated with higher rates of anxiety and depression. These factors can increase risk of heart disease. The study didn’t find a higher rate of other commonly associated diseases (diabetes, obesity, or pre-eclampsia) in the women who developed heart disease, but habits that weren’t reported, like smoking, could be more common in this group and contribute to their risk.Since most mothers tend to prioritize their children’s health over their own, they are more likely to miss the early signs of heart disease when it happens to them.If you are raising a child with heart problems is there anything you should be doing to take care of your own health?There is no extra screening or medication necessary, but the findings of this study offer important advice for mothers and their physicians.Heart disease in women already goes under-detected and undertreated.Anyone with an added risk for heart disease -- and we can now add these moms to the list -- should try to control things like improving your diet (the American Heart Association will tell you how here), exercise, and stop smoking.Know the warning signs of heart disease.If you are only looking for sudden crushing chest pain, the classic and most common description of a heart attack, you need to expand your awareness. Less obvious symptoms are known to turn up more in women: difficulty breathing, nausea, fainting, or new neck, back, or shoulder pain -- sometimes with no chest pain at all. Heart failure (decreased function of the heart that develops over months or years) can show up as fatigue and decreased the ability to exercise, with swelling in the feet or legs.If you do see signs that something isn’t right -- even, of course, if your children never had a heart issue -- see your doctor, so that you can get back on track to being a great mother.This article was written by Dr. Kelly Arps, a resident physician in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is working with the ABC News Medical Unit.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- Three Chicago convenience store clerks were charged on Monday for allegedly selling synthetic drugs laced with rat poison, according to police.The store workers -- Fouad Masoud, 48, Jad Allah, 44, and Adil Khan Mohammed, 44 -- were charged on Monday after undercover federal agents said the men sold them synthetic marijuana, known as K2, according to a criminal complaint.The arrests come as Illinois works to combat a statewide K2 epidemic that as of Monday had killed two and sickened nearly 60 others, public health officials said.The drug can cause users to bleed uncontrollably from their eyes, nose and gums."The synthetic cannabinoids were packaged in sealed containers and labeled with such names as 'Matrix,' 'Blue Giant' and 'Crazy Monkey,’" federal agents said. "Preliminary testing of some of the cannabinoids purchased by the undercover officer revealed a detectable amount of brodifacoum, a toxic substance frequently used in rat poison."Federal investigators said the men sold between 50 and 60 packets of the drugs per day from the King Mini Mart convenience store, located on Chicago’s west side. One of the men, Masoud, had $280,000 in his possession, according to federal drug enforcement agents.Multiple people recently experienced adverse symptoms, including unusual bleeding, after using synthetic cannabinoids obtained from the store, according to the complaint.The store workers are each charged with conspiracy to knowingly and intentionally possess with intent to distribute, and to distribute, a controlled substance.The men are in custody and awaiting court hearings. It wasn't immediately known if they had obtained legal representation.
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  • ABC News(LOS ANGELES) -- Dwayne "The Rock” Johnson is thanking fans after receiving support when he opened up about some of the hardest moments of his life, including his battle with depression."Got tons of responses to this. Thank you," he said, referencing a recent interview with the U.K.'s Express."We all go thru the sludge/s--- and depression never discriminates," Johnson, 45, continued on Twitter. "Took me a long time to realize it but the key is to not be afraid to open up. Especially us dudes have a tendency to keep it in. You’re not alone." In the Express, Johnson recalled his battle with depression -- a topic he often discusses and doesn't shy away from."Struggle and pain is real. I was devastated and depressed," he said. "I reached a point where I didn’t want to do a thing or go anywhere. I was crying constantly."For Johnson, it started while growing up in poverty. And it continued after he witnessed his mother Ata's suicide attempt when he was just 15. "She got out of the car on Interstate 65 in Nashville and walked into oncoming traffic," he told the Express. "I grabbed her and pulled her back on the gravel shoulder of the road."Johnson added, "What’s crazy about that suicide attempt is that to this day, she has no recollection of it whatsoever. Probably best she doesn’t."The former wrestler previously opened up about that incident during a 2015 episode of "Oprah's Master Class" where he went into more detail. Johnson said then that his mother's suicide attempt came after his parents "got into a very big fight."After his parents left their home in one car, he followed them in another car. "Their car starts swerving, and I can clearly see they are arguing," he added during the episode. After his father pulled their car over to the side of the road, his mother got out of the car and "had a glazed look over her eyes that I had never seen before. And she walks right into the middle of I-65 and continues to walk down into incoming traffic. And my heart stopped. Horns were blowing, and cars were swerving out of the way."Johnson's parents later divorced in 2003.Still, the "Rampage" star told the Express that since then he and his mother have both overcome depression."We both healed but we’ve always got to do our best to pay attention when other people are in pain," he said. “We have to help them through it and remind them they are not alone.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK CITY) -- Professional poker players Jamie and Matt Staples won $150,000 after a friend bet that the then 304-pound and 135-pound brothers could not weigh the exact same amount.Just a year ago, Jamie Staples tipped the scale at 304 pounds while his younger brother, Matt Staples weighed in at only 135 pounds. Now, the pair both weight the exact same: 188.3 pounds. Their weight transformation was spurred by a $150,000 bet offered by Bill Perkins, a fellow poker player and friend of the brothers, with the challenge of getting to the same weight in one year."There is so much incentive to start taking health seriously and to learn how to live a better lifestyle," Jamie Staples said of the bet. "I don’t know about you, but for me, I was like, 'Here we go.'"The brothers hit the gym together: Jamie focusing on burning calories, and Matt focusing on building muscle mass. "I fell in love with it," Matt Staples said. "I enjoyed putting on muscle, putting on size."Both brothers also dramatically changed their diets."A year ago," Jamie Staples said, "I was eating whatever my heart told me I wanted to eat."After the challenge began, however, he started trading fast food for healthy smoothies.Jamie Staples said that his diet consisted of "No sugar, very low carbs, protein and vegetables." Meanwhile, Matt Staples added pasta, rice, and lots of protein to his diet."The food part of this bet was a lot harder for me than the workout part of it," Matt Staples said. "Eating 3,000 to 3,500 calories for the last three months of the bet when I had already put on a ton of size got really tiring."Maya Feller, a registered dietitian nutritionist told ABC News' that both brothers' transformations were totally safe. "They really spent some time saying, you know, 'How are we eating, how are we exercising,'" Feller said. "And said, 'Let's make this conscious effort to not only win but to make sustainable change that's based in reality.'"In addition, their transformations "brought them together, which I think is really wonderful," Feller said.At the brothers' final weigh-in, Jamie Staples lost more than 115 pounds. Meanwhile, Matt Staples bulked up by more than 50 pounds.At the end of their year-long journey together, the brothers' reset their health, and became $150,000 richer.
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