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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Dr. Ronny Jackson, the presidential physician, is expected to brief reporters at the White House Tuesday on the results of President Donald Trump’s first physical exam since taking office after deeming the 71-year-old president to be “in excellent health” in a brief statement released soon after the check-up’s completion on Friday.Jackson said he will discuss “some of the details” of the exam's results when he takes the unusual step of answering reporters questions directly at Tuesday's daily briefing.“It is not unprecedented. It is also not considered routine,” said former ABC News correspondent Ann Compton, who covered every White House from President Gerald Ford through President Barack Obama.Back when he served as Obama’s chief physician in 2016, Jackson released a detailed summary of Obama’s periodic check-up that included information about his vitals, an extensive list of results from the many types physical examinations conducted and laboratory results.White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said a "written readout similar to those past" will be released after the briefing.While the president is under no requirement to release details of his health information, each president must decide for himself how much information he believes the American people are entitled to know about their commander-in-chief’s physical fitness.“A president is a very special case and each president has an obligation to decide for himself what should be made public,” Compton said, “and what conditions there may be that could affect or limit the way the president does his job.”In her early days covering the White House, Compton recalled her surprise at the level of detail Ford revealed following one of his periodic check-ups."I recall a pretty detailed summary that included a reference to minor rectal bleeding, something you don’t expect to see from the White House, so certainly for a generation we’ve expected some level of candor on the physicals."
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  • Keila Lino Alcaraz(VISALIA, Calif.) -- A seemingly vibrant 12-year-old California girl, who loved to sing and make her family laugh, suddenly died after her mother said doctors misdiagnosed an infection that kills more than 250,000 Americans annually as the flu.Alyssa Alcaraz died on Dec. 17 at Kaweah Delta Medical Center in Visalia, California, just days after her family was told she had influenza and was sent home with ibuprofen and instructions to rest for seven to 10 days, said the girl's mother, Keila Lino Alcaraz."For her, it wasn't even [the flu]. It was just three days and she was dead," the mother told ABC News.On Alyssa's death certificate, Tulare County officials concluded that she died from cardiac arrest and septic shock, which is the body’s extreme response to an infection. "Sepsis can rapidly cause tissue damage, organ failure and death," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Septic shock is the most severe form of sepsis -- a dangerous complication that can develop from a serious infection -- and it can occur anywhere in the body.Alyssa's mother said she has no plans to sue, but wants doctors nationwide to develop tests for children and others exhibiting similar systems to spare families from tragedies and avoid misdiagnoses in the future."I have mixed emotions. I know doctors and clinics are so overwhelmed with flu cases right now. My thing is, yeah, I could point fingers, but as a mother, I missed it, too," she said.Dru Quesnoy, a spokeswoman for the hospital, declined to discuss Alyssa's case, saying, "Patient privacy laws prohibit us from commenting on the story."Prior to becoming ill, Alyssa appeared to be a normal, healthy girl, and 10 days before her death, the seventh-grader sang at Christmas concert with her middle school choir, her mother said."I have four kids, three girls and a boy, and she was my second," Alcaraz said. "She was the clown of the family. She loved music. She loved singing. She loved science at school."According to the CDC, "Sepsis happens when an infection you already have -– in your skin, lungs, urinary tract or somewhere else -– triggers a chain reaction throughout your body."As for the difference between an infection and sepsis, the CDC says, “An infection occurs when germs enter a person’s body and multiply, causing illness, organ and tissue damage, or disease. If that infection isn’t stopped, it can cause ... sepsis.”Four types of infections that are often linked with sepsis, according to the CDC, are: lungs (pneumonia), kidney (urinary tract infection), skin and gut. There is no single symptom of sepsis, according to the CDC. Symptoms of Sepsis can include a combination of confusion or disorientation, shortness of breath, high heart rate, fever or shivering or feeling very cold, extreme pain or discomfort, and clammy or sweaty skin.People with sepsis are treated in the hospital. Research shows that rapid, effective sepsis treatment, which includes giving antibiotics, maintaining blood flow to organs, and treating the source of infection, can save lives, according to the CDC."Sepsis is, unfortunately, common. When you look at the numbers, it's the third most common death in the United States," Dr. Greg Martin, a critical-care physician at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, told ABC News.He called sepsis "the great masquerader" and said it's prone to fooling doctors into believing it is the flu.A 2017 report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a federal government agency that studies clinical practices, found that sepsis was the third most common reason for hospital stays nationwide, with the exception of pregnancy and childbirth. The infection accounted for 1.67 million cases in 2014, according to the report.About 250,000 Americans die annually from sepsis, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."There's not a single test for sepsis," said Martin. "And
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  • ABC News(DENVER) -- On a warm winter day in Denver, Max Montrose, the 29-year-old president of the Trichome Institute, is “on a weed hunting mission.”Montrose’s quest involves locating proper samples of cannabis to teach the students in his class how to detect specific characteristics of the cannabis flower. He’s been providing cannabis education classes in Colorado for more than eight years.In addition to being the Trichome Institute’s president and co-founder, Montrose has authored several textbooks on cannabis sales training and products, and written for many cannabis-related magazines. He’s also developed his own tools, such as the “Interpening Loop,” to help users determine the effect a cannabis sample might have."My passion is cannabis, and has been since a young age, young teens,” he told ABC News. “My passion has led me down a road of daily research, growing, caregiving, activism, jobs, businesses, and now I am an expert witness in high-level cases and lecturing around the world. I have researched this plant incessantly from credible sources, and worked with it daily for 15 years.”The class Montrose is shopping for on this outing will be a combination of Trichome's Level 1 and Level 2 “Interpening” course. The class starts with a three-hour lecture, where Montrose discusses several topics including the history of cannabis, the anatomy of the plant and how to tell good quality from bad.Following the lecture is an olfactory workshop, where students have the opportunity to get hands-on with the plant. There they learn how to use their senses to determine good and bad cannabis samples, and how to figure out where on the spectrum of psychoactive activity a cannabis sample falls.To do this, Montrose instructs his students to use their senses in order “to break down real, true and noticeable characteristics [of the plant].” He calls his self-taught theory “Interpening” -- a hybridization of the words “interpreting’ and “terpene.”Terpenes are chemical chains that, among other things, give a plant its fragrance. Moreover, it’s widely held that terpenes have a pharmacology, meaning they have certain properties or reactions which can have a therapeutic value.“I discovered Interpening in my later teenage years,” Montrose said. “I discovered all the ways to correlate psychotropic effect with bud structure and smell, and scent perception analysis.”There are three levels of certification for Interpening at the Trichome Institute. For Level 1, the class costs $165 when taken in Denver, and consists of a 3-hour lecture on cannabis basics, the strain name dilemma, trichomes (outgrowths or appendages on plants), strain structures, quality analysis and the methodology behind Interpening. Montrose says the class can sometimes be taught outside the state of Colorado because it doesn’t involve any cannabis samples.Level 2 classes, which Montrose says usually have about 30 students and account for about 95 percent of the Trichome Institute’s Interpening Colorado classes, cost $249 when taken in Denver. The Level 2 classes include the Level 1 lecture, plus an additional olfactory workshop with samples of cannabis. It wraps with a certification test on the skills and information taught in the class.The highest level of Interpening certification -- Level 3 -- is by invitation only.“Level 3 gets more microscopic, hashes and concentrates, horticulture, history and more,” said Montrose.During the first stop on today's mission, Montrose interpened more than a dozen cannabis samples, and left with several teaching examples for his upcoming class. While shopping for samples, Montrose says that often it can be difficult to tell the budtender that he’s not looking for what the typical cannabis consumer might be seeking. While on his bud quests, he’s “needing
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Deepak Chopra's name is synonymous with the holistic health approaches on which he has built his global wellness empire. But the author of several books, celebrity confidante and wildly successful leader of the West's alternative medicine movement is now wading into politics, after witnessing what he views as a polarizing of America over the last year."I was very dismayed by the political climate," Chopra told ABC News. "But then I realized that, actually, in a way, it did bring out the ugliness and the darkness in our collective psyche, right up to the surface. So we are facing it now, and what are we going to do about it?"Chopra, for one, has stepped outside his lane, publishing a collection of songs and poems called "Home: Where Everyone is Welcome," inspired by real stories of U.S. immigrants.He has also penned a strident essay in opposition to President Trump's administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which shielded from deportation hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children."Trump has a long history of hostility to immigrants," Chopra, 70, co-wrote in a September 2017 essay for the San Francisco Chronicle, which argued that ending DACA would hurt America's economy. "By acting the tough guy, he is making America weaker in the long run."Chopra's own immigrant story informs his view today.The New Delhi-born son of an Indian Army doctor was raised in the young nation's best educational system, the Irish Christian missionary schools, by parents who expected him to follow in his father's footsteps. He studied medicine, became a physician and immigrated to the United States in 1970.It was his medical work here, in neuroendocrinology, that led him down the path of linking biochemistry with emotions and wellbeing. It was the freedom to pursue such ideas that led him to develop what were then unpopular ideas, in medical circles, of health as a holistic entity."I was really criticized for this in the beginning because I was saying that, you know, you need to look at patients not just as physical machines or robots - biological robots - but you need to understand what's going on in their lives," Chopra told ABC News, "whether it's in their emotional life, in their personal relationships, or their habits like sleep, stress management, exercise, breathing, nutrition, relationships - the whole ecosystem of health."All of our social ills, Chopra argues, find their roots in the mismanagement of these personal ecosystems -- fear, anger, violence -- all of which, he says, we've seen in spades recently. Yet at a time when more Americans than ever could stand to benefit from Chopra's ideas -- being able to devote energy and time to maintaining healthy, well-balanced lifestyles -- his message has largely been packaged as a luxury good, amplified by celebrity connections like Michael Jackson and Oprah Winfrey, inaccessible to the masses who might need it most.On that point, Chopra does not necessarily disagree."At the same time," he said, "it's very different today than 30 years ago. Now, I do daily, live podcasts, too. And I'm seeing messages from Albania, from Pakistan, from India, from Hong Kong and Calcutta ... everything is easily accessible."Chopra has earned millions as he’s made his message more accessible in the past few decades, which some may find at odds with long-held warnings against the dangers of materialism.Chopra, however, argues that there is no contradiction. During our interview, he even pulled out his New York City Metrocard to prove he still uses public transportation."I had a mantra all my life, and that was, pursue excellence, ignore success. And it worked," Chopra said. "In America, you should never have to apologize for being successful. ... I'm helping people, and if it leads to success, why not?"As for his recent foray into politics, Chopra said that may not be the last time he chooses
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two of the most buzzed-about diets, the Keto diet and the Whole30 diet, have landed at the bottom of a new ranking of best diets for 2018.The Keto diet, which promotes a low-carbohydrate, high-fat regimen, tied for last on the Best Diet Overall list released today by U.S. News and World Report."One of our experts said, ‘Any diet that recommends snacking on bacon can’t be taken seriously as a health-promoting way to eat,'" Angela Haupt, assistant managing editor of health at U.S. News and World Report, told ABC News.Ketogenic, or low-carbohydrate diets, have been used for treatment of epilepsy for decades and more recently gained attention as a tool for weight loss. Severely restricting carbohydrates can result in a process called ketosis."One of the concerns with Keto is how high in saturated fat it is," Haupt said. "Our experts say the diet can be especially dangerous to people with severe diabetes, kidney disease and heart disease."The Whole30 diet, which gets 60,000 searches per month in Google, came in next to last in the ranking of 40 diet plans. The diet, based on a bestselling book, strips food groups like sugar, grains, dairy and legumes from participants’ diets for a full 30 days, according to its website.The expert panel of nutritionists, dietary consultants and physicians that ranked the diets criticized Whole30 in particular, along with the Body Reset diet, for “being ‘fad diets’ that unnecessarily wipe out entire food groups,” according to U.S. News and World Report."The main thing about [Whole30 and Keto diets] is they’re both extreme," Haupt said. "They’re both really restrictive, in some cases wiping out entire food groups, and our experts say it’s just not necessary and it’s not safe or healthy."You’re just not setting yourself up for any type of lasting, healthy, long-term success and you might even do damage to yourself in the process," she added.Topping the list of best diets for 2018 were the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH Diet, which tied for first place."Both of them are really nutritionally sound," Haupt said. "And they also have benefits for chronic diseases and even brain health and heart health."Haupt said a desire for drastic change and fast results could explain why diets like Whole30 and Keto have reached such popularity."Slow and steady might work but it’s not the exciting way to go about things and weight loss can be so frustrating," Haupt said. "You might not see it as quickly but you are setting yourself up for longer, more healthy success when you do choose that sound plan."Diet trends in 2018 will focus on promoting health from the inside out, according to U.S. News and World Report. The magazine reports consumers are interested in eating for whole body health as well as for specific body systems, like skin, muscles, bones, and a healthy nervous system.
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