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  • ABCNews.com(CHICAGO) -- More than a dozen Chicago elementary school students were hospitalized on Wednesday after consuming candy that may have been laced with an unknown substance, police said.The Chicago Police Department said 14 students in the city’s Humboldt Park area were transported to local hospitals as a precaution after eating the candy on Wednesday morning.It did not disclose any information on the student’s identities or ages.The Chicago Public School system confirmed that the children may have ingested an unknown substance in a statement."School officials contacted 911 in response to concerns that a group of students may have ingested an unknown substance earlier this morning,” a spokesperson for Chicago Public Schools told ABC News. “Emergency services providers responded promptly, and a review of the situation is underway."The school system did not say which schools were affected, but a student at the James Russell Lowell Elementary School, located on the city's west side, told ABC affiliate WLS that a classmate had handed out gummies and chocolates on Tuesday and Wednesday before students reported feeling sick."I felt dizzy and tired," the 13-year-old student to WLS on Wednesday after he was released from the hospital.The police department said it was unaware of the student’s conditions and it was not clear if they had been released yet.Both the Chicago Public Schools and Chicago Police Department said their investigations were ongoing.
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  • WPLG(MIAMI) -- A kind Miami Police Department officer helped a homeless man get a new wheelchair.Officer Anna Lazcano had regularly checked on Rafael Alvarez and noticed his previous wheelchair was broken and hard to use."I went and got him the one he's sitting on right now," Lazcano told ABC Miami affiliate WPLG-TV.Alvarez emigrated from Cuba in 1980 and worked as a roofer until quitting for health reasons, including a leg amputation from diabetes, the station reported.He and his wife became homeless when Medicare didn't cover all of their bills and his landlord evicted them, Alvarez told WPLG.Officer Lazcano said, "Regardless of where they are from, where they ended up and what they're doing with their life, it's just helping the community. It is what we're all about."
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  • WABC(NEW YORK) -- Two NYPD officers helped deliver a baby on the West Side of Manhattan Tuesday morning.Officers Tiffany Phillips and Carlos Guadalupe, both 12-year veterans, assisted after they were flagged down by a man who was driving near 41st Street and 10th Avenue.Cellphone video captured the officers in action, and Phillips delivered the baby boy inside the car."They are very grateful for us being there at that spot, at that time," Phillips told ABC New York station WABC-TV.Phillips and Guadalupe had just started their day when a man jumped out of the car and said his wife was going into labor. The couple's 18-month old daughter also was in the backseat."He was very frantic and scared," Phillips said.The couple, who live in Jersey City, had been rushing to Lenox Hill Hospital. Phillips called for an ambulance and leaned into the car, but by then the baby was crowning.Guadalupe ran into a hotel to get towels. When he came back Phillips was holding the little boy, who wasn't breathing."I began to pat his back and to massage him," she said. "Once I did that I heard him begin to cry. His eyes were blinking and he was breathing. That was a great sound!"The mother and newborn were taken to Bellevue Hospital and were said to be doing fine."I got to thank my partner -- A-plus-plus," Guadalupe said. "She held it down and she did her job. She held her composure. She was fantastic." Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- The father of a 6-year-old Florida boy who died after trying to save a rabid bat said he's "never loved anyone or anything more."The sick bat scratched Ryker Roque after his father, Henry Roque, discovered it in a bucket a few weeks ago, the father told ABC affiliate WFTV.Ryker, who did not initially exhibit symptoms, began hallucinating and was rushed to a local hospital where a revolutionary treatment called "the Milwaukee protocol" proved unsuccessful. Ryker died on Sunday.The method, developed by Rodney Willoughby of the Wisconsin Children's Hospital, requires antiviral drugs be administered during a chemically induced coma. The technique has saved at least two U.S. children and 18 people worldwide since Willoughby created it in 2004, said Evan Solochek, a spokesman for the hospital.Officials could not confirm what happened to the bat.Once rabies symptoms appear, survival is extremely rare.The Florida Department of Health declined to provide specific details on Ryker's death but said in a statement that it "confirmed a single human case of rabies that was likely transmitted when an individual was bitten by a bat and did not receive post-exposure prophylaxis. Unfortunately, the individual did pass away.""It is important to avoid direct contact with wildlife," the statement continued. "If you believe you may have been exposed to rabies, contact your health care provider and your county health department immediately. If an exposure occurred, it is important to administer treatment right away."The region experienced a similar case in October 2017, said Kent Donahue, a spokesman for the Florida Department of Health. That person, a resident of Highlands County, also died after being bitten by a bat and not immediately seeking medical attention."I am only aware of these two cases," Donahue said in an email.Preventative medicine has "has proven nearly 100 percent successful" in eradicating U.S. rabies deaths, which declined to one or two annually in the 1990s from about 100 in 1900, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An estimated 40,000 to 50,000 people are treated every year for rabies.In 2015, wild animals accounted for more than 92 percent of reported rabies cases, mostly bats and raccoons, according to the CDC.Rabies occurs in more than 150 countries and territories, according to the World Health Organization."In the Americas, bats are now the major source of human rabies deaths as dog-mediated transmission has mostly been broken in this region," according to the WHO's website.The Lake County Sheriff's Office in Florida does not intend to pursue any charges linked to Ryker's death."At this point, we have not looked into any of that -- it's awful enough," Maj. Chris DeLibro told ABC News. "The way I understood it was, the boy found the bat and thought they were going to help it."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Felicia York’s said her life turned upside down when her husband was placed in a medically induced coma after falling ill with the flu.Her nightmare began in Alabama on Christmas night, she told ABC News, when Adam York said he “felt terrible” and was “coming down with what the kids had.”The couple’s three children had just gotten over the flu and things seemed to be getting back to normal around the house, she said.“Since we had been through it with the kids, we just figured we’ll make some chicken soup like we did before and we’ll just ride it out,” York added.But riding it out, she said, turned out to be a critical mistake.By New Year’s Day, her husband’s symptoms began to worsen and “you could hear the flu in his lungs,” York said of her 38-year-old husband. “He hadn’t slept because he couldn’t get comfortable and he couldn't breathe.”With over-the-counter medications failing, York said, they went to an emergency room. Instead of being in and out like she’d expected, however, doctors told her he tested positive for the flu and would have to be admitted, she said.Within 24 hours of getting admitted, his condition took a turn for the worse. He was moved to intensive care and eventually placed in a medically induced coma, York said, which doctors said was a “last resort.”“It was a 24-hour period; hours went from talking to me on the phone, to being in the bed, on these machines, struggling,” she said. “How fast it went from being just sick and feeling bad to struggling to live.“We don’t know of a reason why because he didn’t have any prior medical history or sicknesses. I mean, there’s nothing underlying we could think of, so it’s really, really strange,” she added.Now, as she struggles to take care of her family and pay her husband’s hospital bills, York said, she wants other people to avoid making the same mistakes they did.“We never took it serious. We never had the flu and we never had the flu shot either,” she said. “I’m not necessarily an advocate of the flu shot because I know that sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.“But if you are sick and if you are feeling bad, call your doctor or go to your doctor. Don’t go to … [the drugstore for medication] unless you really have to.”Felicia York said her husband is self-employed: He owns a popcorn-making business and does not have health insurance. She launched a Gofundme campaign Friday to help with the family’s mounting medical expenses.“They have said that it all depends on Adam, but it could take anywhere from one to three weeks for him to be taken off of the ECMO bypass [life support] and ventilator,” she wrote on the campaign page. “If you feel led, please consider helping us to get our lives back to normal after this terrible flu season.”The campaign had raised a little less than half of its $10,000 goal as of early this morning.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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