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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two years after Chelsey Cardinal first cautioned women against joking about pregnancy on April Fools' Day, the schoolteacher is now a mom, but said she still doesn't find such humor funny.When Cardinal posted the warning to Instagram two years ago, she had been struggling for 18 months with trying to conceive with now-husband, Jamie. The two had suffered a miscarriage and were about to start another round of in vitro fertilization."I've known people for a long time who joke that they're pregnant, and this year it hit me that it does hurt," Kimmel told ABC News back in 2016. That second round of in vitro proved successful, and the Cardinals welcomed their first child, a daughter named Remy, on Jan. 11, 2017."It's been a whirlwind since then," Cardinal, 26, said. "We're actually expecting our second child. We're 12 weeks today. We were going to tell everybody tomorrow."The mom and dad are expecting a baby boy on Oct. 13. This time, they were able to conceive without treatment."This one was actually a little surprise," said Cardinal, of Burrillville, Rhode Island.And although she is past her own infertility struggles, Cardinal said she still doesn't find pregnancy jokes funny."People don't understand that the pain of infertility doesn't disappear just because you have children," Cardinal said. "Looking back on it now, I used to hold so much anger at those posts. Now I look at it as an opportunity to educate people."According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 12 percent of women, ages 15 to 44, have had difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term."When we were trying to conceive, you'd see pregnancy posts -- real or fake -- and it's kind of like a stab in your gut," Cardinal said. "It catches you off guard."Sonya Frazier, a licensed mental health counselor based in Tampa, Florida, told ABC News that it's important to "be mindful of the implications" of jokes and pranks on April Fools' Day."Words do hurt," she said. "And infertility is still much of a personal and private experience for many women and men. To joke about such a topic could potentially trigger a stream of negative emotions in those who are trying to conceive."Cardinal has one suggestion on April Fools' Day for women who are finding it hard to deal with infertility."Just stay off social media," she said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(HONOLULU) -- A 25-year-old man suffered serious injuries in a shark attack in Hawaii on Saturday morning, according to authorities.The attack occurred at 9:30 a.m., according to the Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources.Officials on the Big Island were forced to close down Kukio Beach following the attack. Kukio Beach is located on the Kona Coast near Hualalai and is a popular tourist area, located near the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai and Hualalai Golf Course.Hawaii ABC affiliate KITV reported that the man suffered multiple injuries to his hand and leg.Public beach access remained closed for the rest of Saturday, and KITV reported that a decision on whether to open the beaches on Sunday would not be made until morning. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- An Ohio bride surprised her dad on her wedding day by paying tribute to their special relationship.Before Morgan Gompf walked down the aisle to her now-husband, Greg, on June 25, 2016, in front of 250 guests, she took a moment to greet her father."I knew I always needed a moment with him before the wedding," the bride told ABC News.What Rick, who asked ABC News not to use his last name, didn't know was that his youngest daughter had a surprise for him.Gompf, 26, had taken Rick's blue-and-black flannel shirt and had it stitched on the inside of her wedding dress. The touching "something blue" that Gompf wore made Rick, 60, break down into tears, which was captured in photos that recently went viral."Growing up on the farm, he always just threw on a flannel before we would go outside to do chores," Gompf said, "and he had a flannel that he always wore, which was blue and black checkered."Her father still loves farming, and currently has livestock, horses, cattle and "every farm animal under the sun" on his current farm in Central Ohio.Photographer Erika Brooke, who took the photos, told ABC News she loves the father-daughter moments at weddings because "a lot of the time, it gets overlooked or downplayed, but it’s always been my favorite moments of the whole day."Brooke, who's been professionally shooting weddings for six years, said she didn't know what to expect when Gompf went outside on the venue's back porch to greet her father for the first time."It was just immediate tears for me," she said. "Because I remember that moment with my dad, with my dad giving me away."The bride added that her father had no idea she had used the moment to honor him."When I showed it to him, it was pretty emotional for him and for me," she said of her touching surprise. "We realized -- without it being spoken -- how important our relationship was as a father-daughter relationship."Gompf, who credits Rick with her love of the outdoors and farming, added that she and her dad are "probably best buddies in every sense."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Developing confidence and "creating a speak-up culture among girls is essential in the #MeToo era," according to an author of a new book that shares actionable ways girls can develop and spread confidence."There is no quality more essential and yet maddeningly out of reach for teen girls today than confidence," Claire Shipman, co-author of The Confidence Code for Girls with Katty Kay, told Good Morning America.Confidence is "critical for resilience, success, satisfaction and happiness," she added. Yet as girls grow up, especially at around the time they reach adolescence, they "aren't building confidence as well as boys are.""Even though girls are scaling great academic and intellectual heights," Shipman said, "they also become mired in rumination, people-pleasing, perfectionism and anxiety."Social media contributes to that "quagmire," Shipman said, as it can result in the "dizzying escalation of social conflicts and drama; the ever-present comparisons to other kids posting only the most polished, airbrushed images; and the addiction to the dopamine rush of getting 'likes' and followers."#CaptureConfidence campaignInstagram has partnered with GMA and the authors of The Confidence Code for Girls to launch a campaign to fight back against and use social media as a tool to spread and develop confidence for girls. The #CaptureConfidence campaign encourages girls to share images that express their true, most confident selves.Whether that be through sharing photos of activism work you take pride in or just sharing a selfie embracing your natural hair, the new campaign encourages participants to share snapshots of confidence in all its forms, with the hashtag #CaptureConfidence. On Wednesday, GMA will feature some of the images on the show and on GMA social channels.Instagram tapped five women who are using the platform to inspire their communities and raise awareness about important issues to express their unique and confident selves in a photo shoot.The key ways girls can create confidence is by "taking risks, dealing with failure and embracing authenticity," Shipman said.In the book, the authors developed a mantra, dubbed the "A Confident Girl's Manifesto," that they recommend reading along to at least once a week to help develop confidence."When the focus is on showing their confidence, showing themselves feeling confident -- not pretty or perfect," Shipman said, "girl strength will spread exponentially." Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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