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  • Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to be a better parent in 2018, you’re not alone.From screen time to alone time, here are a few easy ways to make the whole family happier in 2018:Problem: Too much screen time.It’s time for a digital detox, and that goes for both parents and kids. Resolve to put phones/screens away at a certain time. Or, if you find yourself relying on them at a particular time of day, like breakfast -- figure out a replacement behavior instead. So, for example, some parents put phones away from 6-9 p.m. and the focus is on dinner, homework, family and bedtime routines. Instead of the crutch of the iPad in the morning to keep things calm, turn on the music and make the kids be active participants in the morning routine.Problem: Taking care of everyone else, all the time.The general idea is you can’t take care of others if you’re not taking care of yourself. What this looks like in reality is different for everyone. Maybe it’s getting a sitter more often to spend time alone or with your spouse. Maybe it’s yoga or meditation before the kids get up for school. But the overall trend is that women are finally giving themselves and others the permission to take care of themselves.Problem: Not enough time for each child.It's all about quality time with each kid, as opposed to quantity of time with all the kids. Quality one-on-one time isn’t going to be possible each day if you have more than one child, but a conscious effort to spend alone time with each of your children is the key to building a stronger emotional connection and increasing their trust and self-esteem. Think about your kids: Chances are there’s one that’s way more demanding than the other(s). That’s OK, but the child who demands less should never be made to feel less-than because they cooperate and are more self-sufficient.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- One of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies is ending its research into a cure for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(GENEVA) -- The World Health Organization (WHO) is one step closer to classifying obsessive video game playing as an official mental health condition.The eleventh edition of the International Classification of Diseases is slated to be published in 2018 and will include gaming disorder as a serious health condition.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHANHASSEN, Minn.) -- Enough with the polarizing political chatter on cable TV.That's the message from a nationwide health club chain that has pulled 24-hour cable news networks from TVs at its 128 locations because the "consistently negative or politically charged content" doesn't mesh with the company's "healthy way of life philosophy."Life Time Fitness said in a statement posted to its Twitter account, "The decision to remove the national cable network news stations resulted from significant member feedback received over time and our commitment to provide family-oriented environments free of consistently negative or politically charged content."
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  • Christina Karas(HARTFORD, Conn.) -- A Connecticut bride battling an aggressive type of breast cancer died just 18 hours after exchanging vows with her groom.Heather Mosher was diagnosed last December with breast cancer -- the same day her then-boyfriend, Dave Mosher, proposed to her on a horse-and-carriage ride.The two had met at a swing dance group in Hartford, Connecticut, and quickly became friends before dating."I had planned to ask her on Dec. 23, 2016," the groom, Dave Mosher, 35, told ABC News of the proposal. "That morning, we had gone to the doctor after she had found a lump on her breast."A biopsy confirmed that Heather Mosher indeed had breast cancer. But Dave Mosher wasn't deterred."Now more than ever, I needed for her to know that she’s not going to do this alone," he said.While enduring two rounds of chemotherapy and two surgeries, Heather and Dave Mosher planned their nuptials. They were originally set for Dec. 30 -- that is, until Heather Mosher's doctor suggested the couple wed "sooner rather than later," the groom said.The couple exchanged vows in front of family and friends inside St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut, on Dec. 22. Heather Mosher, who was on life support, lay in bed, wearing a wig, a wedding dress and jewelry.Heather Mosher's friend, Christina Karas, was one of her bridesmaids. The two became close friends after meeting in the same swinging dance group four years ago."She was dying, and it was clear while we were all there that these were the last moments of her life," Karas, 36, told ABC News. "She held on to stay alive for the wedding."Dave Mosher said, "Some of her last words were her vows."On the day the couple had initially planned to marry -- Dec. 30 -- the family is instead holding a funeral for Heather Mosher. The coincidence was not intentional, her husband said."It was just like surreal because I’m supposed to be exchanging vows to her, and here I am saying goodbye," Dave Mosher added.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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