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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The community of Sacramento, California, pulled together to help a boy with a congenital heart condition fulfill his dream of becoming a real-life ninja.Bryant Mordinoia, 5, was diagnosed with his condition the day he was born, his father Justin Mordinoia told ABC News today.When asked what he wished for by the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Northeastern California and Northern Nevada, Bryant immediately said he wanted to become a real-life ninja because "ninja's fight bad guys.""He’s the sweetest kid, he doesn’t have a mean bone in his body," Mordinoia said of his son. "He is a very loving kid, a little bit shy. He's opening up today ... he's having a blast.""He had his first open heart surgery at two months old," Mordinoia added. Bryant was scheduled to have another open heart surgery this year, but his father said doctors pushed it back in hopes that he could grow a little stronger first.Mordinoia added that Bryant has been obsessed with the Lego Ninjago movie."If we’re at home, and Netflix is on, if its not Lego Ninjago there's a problem," Mordinoia added. "He walks around the house kicking and punching."The Make-A-Wish Foundation set up ninja training for Bryant and then called on community members to come cheer him on as he saved Sacramento from an evil villain.Bryant will be "called upon to save Sacramento and chase the villain around town with action-packed altercations," the invitation from the Make-A-Wish Foundation stated.Throughout the day, Bryant helped catch a villain who tried to steal an elderly woman's purse outside of the Bank of the West, and then helped free a police officer who was held hostage by the villain in a series of elaborately orchestrated showdowns by the Make-A-Wish foundation and with the support of the community."He won't stop talking and is loving every minute of it," Mordinoia said of the festivities for Bryant held today.Mordinoia added that the support his family has received from the community went "over and above" what he expected, saying that hundreds of people came to cheer Bryant on as he fought off bad guys."I didn't expect it to be half of what it is now, there's hundreds of people here," the father said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Girl Scouts of Central Indiana(NEW YORK) -- Last April Melina Lakey was riding home from a movie with her parents when their SUV clipped a drainage ditch and rolled over six times, landing on its roof.The 9-year-old was pulled to safety by her dad, Jeff Lakey, who was driving. When Melina saw that her mom, Ashley McCollum-Lakey, was stuck in the passenger seat, she ran back to help.“When the airbags deploy you can’t see any of the doors, so she lifted them up so I could find my way out,” McCollum-Lakey told ABC News. “She said, ‘Mommy I’m right here. Come to me.’”She continued, “She lifted up five impact airbags to get me out, through glass and debris.”Melina, a Girl Scout from Pendleton, Indiana, was honored Thursday for her heroism by the Girl Scouts of the USA.She received the Medal of Honor, one of two Lifesaving Awards given by the Girl Scouts for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.”The Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, the 45-county council that represents Melina’s troop, has awarded only one other Lifesaving Award in the past decade, according to a council spokeswoman.“It felt really good,” Melina, a fourth grader who has been a Girl Scout for the past five years, told ABC News. “It felt like everybody cared.”Melina, who was 8 at the time of the accident, took control after rescuing her mom by calling 911 on her parents' cellphone. She and her mom, who is her troop leader, had spent that April day at a local fire department with fellow Girl Scouts learning first aid skills and what to do in an emergency.“They said that if you’re ever in a big accident, always call 911,” Melina said.She added, "Even though you think [an accident] is not going to happen to you, it still will. They taught me everything I needed."Melina and her dad escaped the accident with no injuries. McCollum-Lakey suffered a shoulder injury and some bruising but credits her daughter with saving her life.“Melina didn’t think twice,” she said. “She knew there was glass and debris and she just wanted to make sure that she knew mommy and daddy were OK.”Melina, whose favorite Girl Scout activity is hiking, also received a congratulatory letter from Girl Scouts of the USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo.“Your extraordinary courage, incredible confidence, and your willingness to take decisive action in the midst of an emergency has not only saved a life, but also serves as a shining example for Girl Scouts everywhere of fortitude and dedication,” the letter read in part. “Your heroism and sound judgment have earned you a place in the pantheon of heroes who have come before you, and left an indelible mark on the Girl Scouts.”Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MIAMI) -- A mother and her 4-month-old baby were rescued Sunday as floodwaters from Hurricane Irma filled their North Miami Beach, Florida, home.A man called 911 around 4:30 p.m. to report he was concerned about his neighbor and her child who were in their home as water was rising, according to North Miami Beach Police Department Major Richard Rand.Wind gusts from Irma were still approaching 60 mph at the time of the 911 call so the police department deployed a specialized military vehicle to rescue the woman and child.  The Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle had five first-responders on board and reached the home within 10 minutes of the 911 call, Rand told ABC News.“They found them in waist high water, standing there in a panic,” said Rand, incident commander of the North Dade Emergency Operations Center. “The mom handed the child to the officer, an officer grabbed the mother and got them both to safety.”The police officer who rescued the child, Nicholes Lentz, is a father of two and a former U.S. Marine, according to Rand.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Even as Hurricane Irma was barreling toward the Florida Keys, one couple decided they wouldn't leave without their dolphins.Phillip Admire, director of zoology at Island Dolphin Care, and his wife Michelle Crosetto, a veterinarian, remained in Key Largo to protect their dolphins. The marine mammals work with veterans and autistic children through the organization's dolphin-assisted therapy programs.The devastation from Irma caused a dangerous situation for the dolphins because of water contamination, debris and other factors. The animals were also at risk of being pushed out of their habitat because of the storm.  To protect the dolphins, Admire said he thoroughly secured the area."The number one concern was that trees might fall down and tangle them in something, they could drown or be injured," Admire told ABC News. "I knew after the hurricane, the Florida Keys were going to be shut down and [the dolphins] would go a week or more without any care. I wasn't going to leave them."Admire said the bridge in Monroe County that leads to his facility has closed down. If he had evacuated, he and his wife would not have been able to get to their dolphins, he added.For the past four days, Admire said he's been hunkered down at Island Dolphin Care, tending to the animals."For this business, dolphins are therapy," he said. "If anything were to happen, I would be out there searching for them and most likely we'd find the survivors because they'd be out there looking for us."The dolphins' lagoon is overflowing, but the mammals have stayed in their habitat, according to Admire."All eight [dolphins] are OK, which is amazing," Admire noted. "The water was over the fences and thank God they didn't leave."Admire's generator is running but the freezer which holds fish for the dolphins is not working, he said. His priority is to have someone repair the freezer so the dolphins don't run out of food.
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  • KTRK-TV(HOUSTON) -- A mother of three who was rescued with her family from the roof of a two-story home was reunited for the first time with the man who saved their life.When Iashia Nelson, 36, finally saw a boat bring them to safety, she said her emotions overcame her. "I was so emotional I couldn't hold back my tears, I was crying," Nelson said today on Good Morning America.
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