Archives
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Before chowing down on Thanksgiving, you might want to save some room for extra veggies on your plate.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(PHOENIX) -- An Arizona woman unexpectedly gave birth Wednesday while en route to the hospital.At 1:23 a.m. on November 8, Shannon Geise, 31, delivered her own son after pulling over her family SUV near 32nd Street and Union Hills in Phoenix.Baby Sebastian arrived weighing 6 pounds, 7 ounces."I could have never guessed that I was going to give birth in the car," Geise told ABC News. "Everybody's pretty surprised obviously, a little bit in shock just like me. [We're] happy he's here and that everyone's healthy and there's no complications. He's a great baby."Geise is also mom to Devon, 11, Dominik, 9, Damen, 5 and Olivia, 1.Geise said her water broke around midnight. She grabbed Olivia and headed to Abrazo Scottsdale Campus, formerly known as Paradise Valley Hospital. That night, Geise's three boys were with their father, Geise's former husband. Sebastian's father was at his own home at the time, Geise said."I got in the car and my biggest fear at that time was that I wasn't going to make it in time to get an epidural," Geise recalled. "As I started driving, it just became extremely intense and the hospital is only 15 to 20 minutes from my house. I got almost all the way there and I had a contraction that would not stop ... that's when I felt [the baby] actually move down."Geise pulled her vehicle over and dialed 911. The recording was released by the Phoenix Fire Department to ABC News."What's wrong?" the dispatcher asked."I just delivered a baby in my car," Geise replied.The dispatcher offered to send an ambulance, but Geise was already less than five minutes down the road."She called 911 where she was offered an ambulance and a firetruck with paramedics to assist her in safely getting to the hospital after delivering her child," the fire department wrote in a statement to ABC News. "The caller stated she was already on her way to the hospital and was approximately a half a mile away."The department went on, "The alarm room then called the hospital to make them aware that a woman who had just given birth was roughly 3 minutes away from their hospital. Mom and baby are both doing great."Geise drove herself the rest of the way to the hospital where she, her newborn son and 1-year-old daughter were greeted by emergency staff."The physicians, nurses and other caregivers in the Abrazo Scottsdale Campus emergency department are trained to handle uncommon emergent situations like this," the hospital wrote in a statement to ABC News. "We are proud of the care we gave Shannon and her baby when they arrived at our hospital, and we wish them both a happy and healthy future."Geise said she and baby Sebastian are doing well.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- After this morning's mass shooting at a church in rural Texas left at least 26 people dead, many parents are wrestling with how to explain the seemingly inexplicable act of violence to their children.The shooting, with victims' ages ranging from 5 to 72, comes just over a month after a gunman opened fire on a crowd at a music festival in Las Vegas, killing 59 people.In the aftermath of the two recent gun massacres, which occurred at places young people frequent -- a concert and a church -- here are what experts say parents and caregivers can do to help their children cope with such events. Robin Gurwitch, a psychologist and member of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, told ABC News it is important for parents to initiate such difficult conversations with their children."It’s important for parents to start the conversation," Gurwitch told ABC News last month after the Vegas shooting. “As much as we would like to wrap our arms around our children and try to keep anything bad from getting through, it’s unrealistic that we have that ability."In addition, for children old enough to understand what happened, parents should focus on letting them know that they are not in specific danger, Gurwitch added.Dr. Lee Beers, a pediatrician at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., said a tragedy does not have to be traumatic for children if it is "buffered by good, strong and caring relationships, by the adults around the child."Beers, who spoke to ABC News after the Vegas shooting, also recommended different responses for different ages, and an individual approach for each child.Preschool age: This is a time when parents have a high level of control over what their children see and hear so it does not need to be brought up unless a child hears about it first. In that case, Beers recommended making sure the child knows the caregiver is there to answer any questions.Elementary school age: This is an age when parents should preemptively help their child know about the tragedy and share basic details and leave the door open for them to ask questions, Beers said.Middle and high school age: Beers advised having a more detailed conversation with children. Start by asking questions like, "Have you heard about this?" and "What do you think about this?" to find out what they know and what may be bothering them.Beers added that parents should limit their children's exposure to potentially frightening images and videos that may emerge, especially on social media, in the aftermath of a mass shooting."Repeated exposure to viewings really does increase the stress and trauma in your emotions, in the way that you respond to it," Beers said. "It's very tempting to watch the coverage 24-7 so I think really self-limiting that is really important because that repeated exposure escalates the emotions and escalates the feelings."Gurwitch added that many children may have already seen some frightening images, and parents should let their children know that they can discuss what they have seen."Parents should let their kids know that, ‘I’m here to answer any questions you may have, any worries you have we can discuss,’" she said. "Check in at the end of the day to see what their friends were talking about at school and what they saw on social media so they have an idea of where they’re starting from and how to continue the conversation." If parents and caregivers notice children are overly worried or having trouble focusing at school or at home, Gurwitch said not to delay in reaching out for help, and to have patience."Acknowledge that there may be a little bit of extra help that is needed with homework, care and attention around bedtime, and that’s true for younger children as well as teenagers," she said. "If you don’t know what to do or what to say, there are people you can turn to ask what you can do for your child."Gurwitch and Beers also recomm
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A group of teenagers took part in an experiment by giving up social media, online games, streaming video and texting for an entire week.After participating in SheKnows Media's Hatch #DigitalDetox workshop, the kids, all 12 to 13 years old, shared their experiences on ABC's Good Morning America. The results revealed just how attached they are to their phones, they said."I've had one of those nights where [I was] like, 'I need my phone!'" Reed told GMA. "So I constructed myself this, it's my fake phone." A positive takeaway from the experiment was that the teens appeared to be more engaged with others and more productive with homework. All the kids were asked who they would challenge to do the digital detox next and they all nominated their parents.Jojo's mom, Hillary, said her daughter was less distracted as a result of the experiment."She listened to music, she spent more time with us. I really enjoyed it," Hillary said.The kids said that giving up all that screen time made them feel "refreshed, relieved, calm and good."Dillon said parents don't necessarily need to be concerned about how much screen time kids are getting, but what activities they engage in and how it affects their mood."If you watch your kids and talk to them and slow it down and understand what they are using it for, then it can be perfectly healthy and normal," Dillon said.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A private Facebook group has helped its members lose a collective 4,000 pounds by offering tips, encouragement and community for men hoping to shed excess weight when they don't know where to start.Joshua LaJaunie, a self-described country boy from Louisiana, said he founded the "Missing Chins Run Club," on Facebook to give "beer-drinking, back-slapping men an avenue to health and happiness."LaJaunie said he decided to turn his life around after he weighed in at 420 pounds, and he started by just walking on a treadmill. Eventually, he started running, and has since lost 230 pounds."Compared to where I was, I'm an Olympian," LaJaunie told ABC News.The private group, which now has more than 80 members who have lost over 4,000 pounds collectively, gives men a platform to share their weight loss journeys and cheer each other on."I didn’t realize it was going to be so big in the beginning but I really had aspirations that we would be able to reach out," Lajaunie said Thursday on Good Morning America. "I had been inspired throughout my journey and I felt it important to pay it forward to the universe and to do that for other guys."He added, "To see what has come of it is just amazing."Jason Cohen, 33, of Lafayette, Louisiana, lost 125 pounds through the support he found in the Facebook group."Whenever I don’t feel like getting up in the morning or running, I see somebody else post they ran four miles, I’ve to go run six," Cohen said. "If they’ve run six, I’ve got to run eight.""It keeps me motivated to get up every day, lace up my shoes and just get out there."Marcus Cook, 45, of Houston, lost 280 pounds and completed an Ironman, a long-distance triathlon."Two years ago, I was 500 pounds," Cook said. "I started walking 20 minutes a day and six months ago, I did a full Ironman."Justin Lacy, of Missouri, lost close to 300 pounds.He said he was inspired to lose weight after his mom suffered a stroke, and now he is the inspiration for his family."They’re so proud of me and they’re eating plant-based too and getting healthy too and losing weight and getting off medications," Lacy said. "It’s a beautiful thing."Tim Kaufman, of New York, lost nearly 200 pounds through the "Missing Chins Run Club.""It just keeps everybody motivated in so many different ways," Kaufman said. "I think that I can speak for all of us: it’s not just about what we’ve lost, it’s what we’ve gained."Josh Turner, 39, of Thibodaux, Louisiana, said the nearly 100 pounds he lost is more than just a number."It was never really about the weight, it was more about getting my Type 1 diabetes under control," he said. "That’s all it is."The 'Missing Chins Run Club' founder's top-3 weight loss tips:1. Understand the concept of "calorie density" in food
    Read more...