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  • Creatas/Thinkstock(GALVESTON, Texas) -- Scores of Texans died when Hurricane Harvey unleashed a biblical storm with massive surgewaters and devastating wind gusts that punished the area.The rebuilding effort has also been difficult -- and tragic.On Oct. 16, a carpenter in Galveston, Texas, named Josue Zurita lost his life after a flesh-eating bacteria caused a disease called necrotizing fasciitis that spread through his body.Zurita, who went by the nickname "Cochito," according to his obituary, was remembered as a faithful Catholic, "a loyal friend" and "a loving father and hardworking carpenter."The 31-year-old was hospitalized for a "wound on his upper left arm," according to the Galveston County Health District statement. That's when the lethal bacteria was detected, though officials believe he had been infected days earlier. Necrotizing fasciitis kills the connective tissue around muscles, blood vessels, nerves and fat, as the bacteria spreads through the body, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). It can become fatal very quickly.“It’s most likely this person’s infection occurred when bacteria from Harvey debris or floodwater entered his body through a wound or cut,” said Galveston County Local Health Authority's Dr. Philip Keiser.The Mexican native moved to the U.S. back in 1986 "to help his family," the obituary states, and dedicated himself to helping Harvey-stricken victims rebuild."He remained to help with the rebuilding after Hurricane Harvey [sic] hit Harris and Galveston counties," read the obituary. "While working ... he was struck with an illness that claimed his life."Zurita is the second fatal victim of what the Galveston County Health Department called a quick-spreading "rare bacterial infection that kills soft tissue" and can lead to organ failure.A month prior, a Houston resident named Nancy Reed, 77, passed away at home from the same infection, according to a breakdown of Harvey-related deaths compiled by the Harris County Medical Examiner's Office.First responder and former firefighter and medic J.R. Atkins survived after contracting the same deadly bacteria from an infected insect bite on his arm while lending aid to Missouri City storm survivors in September.Zurita's death has led Galveston County Health District officials push for more awareness of the disease. The health agency cautioned the public not to confuse the necrotizing fasciitis with less harmful bacteria found in beach water like Vibrio vulnificus.Anyone in hurricane-affected areas is cautioned to follow the guidelines from the CDC to maintain sanitary habits like washing hands with soap and water, quickly apply first aid to injuries and, even if minor, dressing wounds or cuts with dry bandages.The CDC estimates there have been 700 and 1,100 diagnosed cases of necrotizing fasciitis in the United States each year, but says that those numbers are conservative.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • (Nichole Herrera) Nichole Herrera of Corpus Christi, Texas, went viral with this Halloween-themed glow-in-the-dark manicure.(CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas) -- Nichole Herrera, a manicurist at Artistic Nails in Corpus Christi, Texas, has gained overnight fame for her insanely elaborate glow-in-the-dark The Nightmare Before Christmas-themed nail art.When she first started doing nails, “they were horrid,” Herrera, 29, told ABC News.“They were really bad, but I just kept practicing,” she continued. “Over the eight years I’ve been doing it, I’ve been picking up different techniques. You have to be very patient with your work. I’m very patient, and that’s what it takes.”The nail artist said the glow-in-the-dark manicure took her about two hours to complete using water-based nail stripper brushes.Herrera’s Halloween masterpieces don’t stop there, though. Check out these other macabre manicures.Terrifying clown and frightening flames
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  • manifeesto/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- When one woman met a young man in a popular D.C. nightclub, she had no idea she'd go onto marry him, much less become part of a royal family.But that's just what happened when Ariana Austin met Joel Makonnen in Pearl Nightclub 12 years ago.Austin told ABC News it was "days before my 22nd birthday" and she had no idea the relationship would last. "We were just so young; that's the thing," she recalled.But for Makonnen, 35, the great-grandson of Ethiopia's last emperor, Haile Selassie, he had a feeling right away that Austin was different, noting that "within five minutes, I said, 'You'll be my girlfriend.'""It was more like an assertive question," he added with a laugh. "I just had a really good chemistry with her right away. I felt like I already knew her."Still, the prince was hesitant to reveal his royal heritage to his new girlfriend."We were with some friends ... and one of my friends brought it up and said, 'You know, you're lucky. Your boyfriend is a prince!" Makonnen recalled. "And I always kind of like had my own way to introduce it, but he just put it out there and I kind of laughed it off.""But then she turned to me and said, 'What? Is he serious? What does he mean?'" Makonnen said, explaining how his friend told his future bride, "I am serious. He's the great-grandson of Haile Selassie."Although his humility tried to downplay the importance, Makonnen said it was Austin's reaction to the news that confirmed what he already knew -- that she was the one."She kind of got it right away in the most respectful sense," he explained, "where she was like, 'Wow don’t shrug. It’s a big deal. I’m really impressed and it’s amazing.'"Austin, 33, told ABC News she was "pleasantly surprised" by the news. "I obviously knew of the emperor, but I didn’t know the full scale of it then."The two wed in front of more than 300 people on Sept. 9 inside Debre Genet Medhane Alem Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church in Temple Hills, Maryland.Wedding planner Yodit Grebreyes told ABC News, "They chose to get married on the Ethiopian New Year because it’s about new beginnings and they were creating a new life together."Austin, whose grandfather was a lord mayor of Georgetown, Guyana, and Makonnen are "still in the process of moving," the prince said, adding that they've chosen an apartment in the Washington, D.C., area.Right now, they're both looking forward to starting a royal life together."It feels pretty weighty but I’m excited," Austin said. "It’s the world’s oldest monarchy and there’s just something pretty powerful about that. Of course I'm happy to be a part of it and I hope I can ... be of service and take all this good will and all this good energy and just turn it back and do good work in our countries."Makonnen added, "I just look forward to being with Ariana all the time and kind of continuing this journey."
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  • Jevgenij Kulikov/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Southwest Airlines has marked their very first "unmanned" flight.The company tweeted photos on Oct. 18 of the all-female crew posing before takeoff on the Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft.
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  • (Mike Juliannelle) Mike Juliannelle, 41, the author of Dadandburied.com, poses with his two sons in this undated family photo.(NEW YORK) -- Mike Julianelle, a blogger and father of two, gained internet fame by posting photos of all the things kids can ruin, like when his kids turned a coffee table into a train set.The 41-year-old Brooklyn dad, is now sharing photos on Instagram of how kids have changed the parents themselves.
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