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  • JK1991/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued warning letters to four companies on Wednesday that sell products online that claim to "prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure cancer without evidence to support these outcomes."According to the FDA, the sale of unapproved products can put patients at risk, and "the deceptive marketing of unproven treatments may keep some patients from accessing appropriate, recognized therapies to treat serious and even fatal diseases."The agency says it is concerned by the sale of such products, which allegedly contain cannabidiol, a component of the marijuana plant. Cannabidiol is not approved for any indication, the FDA says, but is marketed in a variety of products that claim to reverse or cure cancer, kill or inhibit cancer cells, and other anti-cancer claims."Substances that contain components of marijuana will be treated like any other products that make unproven claims to shrink cancer tumors," said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. "We don't let companies market products that deliberately prey on sick people with baseless claims that their substance can shrink or cure cancer and we're not going to look the other way on enforcing these principles when it comes to marijuana-containing products."The letter was sent to Greenroads Health, Natural Alchemist, That's Natural! Marketing and Consulting, and Stanley Brothers Social Enterprises LLC. "We have an obligation to provide caregivers and patients with the confidence that drugs making cancer treatment claims have been carefully evaluated for safety, efficacy, and quality, and are monitored by the FDA once they're on the market," Gottlieb said. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- More Americans are stressed by the future of the nation than ever before, the American Psychological Association's report "Stress in America."The survey found that 63 percent of Americans say the future of the country is "a very or somewhat significant cause of stress." That figure is higher than the number of Americans who say the sameabout money (62 percent) or work (61 percent).More than half of Americans, 59 percent, say that this is the lowest point in American history -- a datapoint which spans generations that lived through World War II, Vietnam, the Cuban Missile Crisis and September 11th."We're seeing significant stress transcending party lines," Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD and APA's Chief Executive Officer. "The uncertainty and unpredictability tied to the future of our nation is affecting the health and well-being of many Americans in a way that feels unique to this period in recent history."Americans cited health care, the economy, trust in government, hate crimes, war and terrorist attacks, and others as factors for their stress. The findings also showed that women are generally more stressed than men -- 5.1 versus 4.4 on a 1-10 scale where 1 is "little or no stress" and 10 is "a great deal of stress."Black and Hispanic men also reported higher average stress levels, 4.8, than white men, 4.2.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • AlexRaths/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Halloween calls for candy, costumes and lots o' celebration. “Good Morning America” teamed up with DIY guru Brit Morin, the founder and CEO of Brit + Co, to share her top tips and tricks to throw an Instagram-worthy party at the last minute.Whether you’re kicking back with your hubby and kids for Halloween or inviting over a group of your besties, these ideas will enable you and your crew to reach your ultimate "squad ghouls," Morin told "GMA."Read on for Morin’s tips and DIY ideas to impress and have a “spooktacular” Halloween.Frankenstein avocado toastAvocado toast has been all the rage this year so we decided to give it a Halloween spin by turning each slice into a mini Frankenstein. All you'll need to do is mash your avocado and spread onto a piece of toast.Cut pieces of blue corn tortillas to give Frankenstein his spiky hair-do and neck bolts.Next, cut up red peppers, dill pickles, olives, and radishes to make the rest of Frankenstein's face. Ghouly and delicious! See a video of this creation here.Black widow venom punchTo create this creepy-crawly punch you'll want to mix cranberry juice, blood orange soda, lemon juice and a bit of sugar into a large punch bowl. The ice cubes are where things start to get creepy. Add plastic spiders into your ice tray and then set in the freezer for four hours. Once your guests are about to arrive, top off the punch with the spider ice cubes and get ready to cause a fright.Take your punch to the next level by freezing water in a plastic glove -- once frozen, let the hand float in the punch bowl and stand back to watch your friends' petrified faces. Top the punch off with dry ice to give it that spooky phantom fog. Check out a video here.Blood-splattered photo booth and creepy eyeball propsThe first rule of throwing a party is to ensure you have a place to pose and snap some photos. For our last-minute Halloween party, we used a white tablecloth and red acrylic paint to create a gory, blood-dripping backdrop. And of course, a photo booth isn’t complete without props!To create the eyeballs, you will want to use white round balloons. Next, cut a medium-size circle out of green tissue paper and then a smaller black circle out of construction paper. Use double-sided tape to attach these circles together and then to the balloon. Make these eyeballs even creepier by using a red marker to create veins around the eyeball. (Idea via Studio DIY)Ice Ice Baby costumeThis "Ice Ice Baby" family costume is not only silly, but super easy. All you need are clear trash bags and a blue Sharpie. Hand-letter on the word ICE and then cut a hole for your waist and two holes on the side for your arms. Slide the bag over your shirt and stuff with more clear trash bags to resemble ice. Dress your little boo up as the hottest rapper with a matching tracksuit and rad sunglasses. (Idea via The Thinking Closet)Social butterfly costumeThis next idea takes the term "social butterfly" to a whole new level. Simply print out the logo of a few social channels -- i.e. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. -- and iron them onto a black shirt. Create butterfly wings out of black and colorful felt and attach the wings to the backside of the shirt. On the other edge of the wing, attach a hair tie to slip onto your wrist. This will allow you to spread your wings and show all of your social-loving colors.Take the costume a step further and dress your dog as a smartphone. Use felt to create the smartphone design on the back of a black dog shirt. (Idea via Instagram @allisonwood) Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • zimmytws/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- On Wednesday, Nov. 1, insurance marketplaces will begin open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act. But with so much attention focused on the debate surrounding repealing the law, many are bewildered about their coverage options through the law, or if there will even be insurance to buy.“The marketplace is not repealed and is very much alive,” said Sara Collins, vice president for health care coverage and access at the Commonwealth Fund, a nonpartisan health care advocacy group. While there may be some uncertainty about the long-term stability of insurance marketplaces, given the congressional confusion on financial support, it is important for consumers to focus on the fact that Congress has not repealed the Affordable Care Act.There are, however, some important differences this year for consumers to note if they would like to obtain health coverage.Most importantly: consumers have less time to buy insurance on the exchanges than ever before. While some states have extended their open enrollment period, this year’s open enrollment is shorter by 45 days compared to last year. Open enrollment starts Nov. 1, and many consumers will have until Dec. 15, 2017, to buy their insurance plans for 2018.After Dec. 15, those without insurance will only be able to purchase a plan if they qualify for the so-called special enrollment period, typically because of “certain life events, like getting married, having a baby, or losing other health coverage,” according to healthcare.gov.Additionally, planned website down times may make healthcare.gov, the main portal for consumers to apply for coverage, periodically unavailable. It was reported earlier that these new web down times may occur every Sunday from midnight to noon, during what was a convenient time for families to convene and discuss finances.The other important piece to note: price. After a year of being inundated with headlines about skyrocketing costs of insurance, health care may feel like an unaffordable luxury to many. For some, there may be increases in premiums, “but most people who buy on the marketplace are eligible for help, and they won’t see these big increases,” says Collins. “Some people might even see premiums go down.”Most Americans receive health care from their employer, and the current fight over the Affordable Care Act is not expected to directly affect the coverage that these people receive. “None of the policy activity this year, including efforts to repeal and changes from Trump, have any implications for employer based coverage,” says Collins.But for those who do not receive healthcare from their employer or Medicare, Americans can still go to healthcare.gov to shop for care. Even before Nov. 1, users can preview costs for plans for next year, shop for the plan that is best for them, and compare offerings for different level plans based on the amount of support for which they’re eligible. Some users might see large savings in monthly premiums as well as deductions in their out-of-pocket costs.Marketplace plans are divided into three tiers: silver plans, which are considered the benchmark with the most standard coverage; gold plans, which are more expensive and usually appeal to people anticipating the need for more care; and bronze plans, considered riskier, with lower monthly costs but higher out-of-pocket costs when care is needed. Collins noted that this year, premium increases may cause subsidies to rise on the more expensive plans. “People may be surprised to find that gold plans are cheaper than they were last year.”For those whose eyes glaze over at talk of subsidies, premiums, cost-sharing and tax credits, there is help. Healthcare.gov incorporates available benefits, based on family size and income, into the price you see for your plan on the website. Consumers need to consider how much they want to pay per month, and what
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  • (Scott Babcock) A seal is seen at the airport runway in Utiqiagvik, Alaska, Oct. 23, 2017.(UTQIAGVIK, Alaska) -- While it’s not uncommon for wildlife to wander onto airport runways every now and then, one animal in Utqiagvik, Alaska, surprised an airport worker who thought he’d seen everything.Scott Babcock, a foreman at the Wiley Post-Will Rogers Memorial Airport, said he saw a large bearded seal sprawled on the airfield on Monday."It was very strange to see the seal. I’ve seen a lot of things on runways, but never a seal," Babcock told ABC News.He said he expected the animal to perhaps be "a small spotted seal, not a 450-pound Oogruk."Babcock said that airport staff are "not allowed to handle or haze marine mammals," so he took a video of the massive sea mammal while he waited for wildlife control to arrive and safely help it on its way.North Slope Borough Animal Control came out to the airport and moved the seal using a heavy-duty snow blower and a sled.Babcock said that at small, rural airports like Wiley Post-Will Rogers, staff "wear every hat" and take care of tasks from security to snow removal, which was what he was doing when he spotted the seal.
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