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  • (Things of My Very Own) Things of My Very Own, an organization in Schenectady, N.Y. that helps kids in crisis, shared the Christmas wishes of some of the children they work with.(NEW YORK) -- There's nothing like a little perspective to make a person realize how lucky they are.While many are clamoring for the iPhone X this holiday season, some kids in this country are in need of the basics, like food.Rayn Boncie, founder of Things of My Very Own, an organization that provides crisis intervention services to children impacted by extensive abuse and/or neglect, posted this message on Facebook from one child in its care:"I want school snacks so I'm not the only one not eating during snack time at school."People from as far away Italy and Switzerland have contacted the organization after seeing that message, she said."That post seems to have moved a lot of people," Boncie said.
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  • sudok1/iStock/Thinkstock(HONOLULU) -- Seven hospital workers in Hawaii have been relieved of their duties without pay after an "extremely dangerous" psychiatric patient escaped from there and boarded a flight to California, officials said.The Hawaii State Hospital employees were placed on off-duty status without pay while officials investigate how the patient, Randall Saito, managed to break free from the mental health facility on Oahu and travel some 2,350 miles on Sunday. Saito was captured in northern California three days later."The hospital employees are being notified and will be relieved of their duties for 30 days as the internal investigation continues. As the investigation progresses, more employees may be identified and placed on off-duty status," the Hawaii State Department of Health, which runs the hospital, said in a statement Wednesday. "The department is committed to a thorough investigation, evaluation and correction of our hospital protocols and procedures to prevent this type of incident from reoccurring."Meanwhile, all unescorted on-campus and off-campus privileges at Hawaii State Hospital have been stopped and visits to Kaneohe Clubhouse community center have been suspended, the health department said.Hospital staff have also been retrained on the accountability process, security personnel have been reassigned and extra security fencing is being obtained, the department said.Hawaii Department of Health Director Dr. Ginny Pressler said at a press conference Wednesday afternoon that Saito's escape was a "result of a major breakdown" in staff protocols, procedures and guidelines at the hospital. An initial internal investigation revealed that staff "may have inadvertently or purposely neglected" to notify supervisors of the incident, Pressler added.In 1981, Saito was committed to the Hawaii State Hospital just outside Honolulu in Kaneohe after being acquitted of first-degree murder by reason of insanity. He walked out of the psychiatric hospital Sunday morning and chartered a plane to Maui. He boarded another plane from there, according to the Honolulu Police Department.While on the loose, Saito was considered "extremely dangerous and should not be approached,” police warned.Saito arrived in San Jose, California, on Sunday night. He was arrested in Stockton on Wednesday morning at about 10:30 a.m. PT "as the result of a tip received from an alert taxi cab driver," the San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office said.Saito was still in California on Wednesday afternoon awaiting positive fingerprint identification, according to Hawaii Gov. David Ige. The patient had been missing for more than 10 hours by the time hospital staff alerted authorities, Ige said."I am deeply concerned that such a dangerous person was able to escape from the Hawaii state hospital and remain undetected for such a long period of time," Ige said at a press conference Wednesday. "Authorities and the public should have been notified much, much sooner."Authorities have evidence that Saito's escape was "premeditated," "intentional" and "planned," said Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin."This was something that was not done by someone who was suffering from any sort of mental defect or disability," Chin said. "We intend to press that argument with the court when he was flown back."Saito is awaiting an extradition hearing in California, and his bail will be set at $500,000, according to Chin. If he posts bail, then he will be placed back in the custody of the Hawaii State Hospital, Chin said. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Hayley Garnett(NEW YORK) -- Many women hide the scars of pregnancy, but one mom put hers on display in a very public way instead.Hayley Garnett recently gave birth to twin girls Ruby and Ramona. She also has a son, Archer. Among the beautiful pictures of her children on her Instagram is a photo that stands out.In it, she holds her twins next to her bare stomach covered in stretch marks. "Happy one week birthday, ladies," she wrote. "This morning Archer asked me what’s wrong with my belly and I told him that all of my babies leave marks on my belly so that I never forget for a second that I grew them in my body all on my own and that they exist earthside with me now! A forever reminder, whether I’m truly confident having these marks or not, it’s no doubt a testament to the miracles my body has made."Her photo has been liked almost 12,000 times."I decided to share the story because I habitually try to share a lot of personal feelings through my Instagram page because I really believe that showing your vulnerability is not only a healing process but also has the ability to really connect you with an individual or community in a way you may not have thought possible," Garnett told ABC News. "I hoped that being open and honest about the marks that twin pregnancy gave me would give other moms the courage to actually accept themselves and maybe see their own marks in a different, more positive light."She said the reaction has been almost entirely positive. Her only detractors, she said, are people who think "I was intentionally editing my photo to make my marks look excessive which in itself just seems like a silly accusation."The Columbia, Missouri, mom said her husband, Cody Garnett, "is so very supportive of everything that I do and is always on my team. He makes me feel beautiful no matter what and would not hesitate to assure other women who bear the marks of pregnancy that they are beautiful as well."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • (ABC News) ABC News' James Longman tries on Richard Browning's jet suit.(READING, England) -- British inventor Richard Browning is a real-life Iron Man.Recently, Browning, the man behind the 1,050-horsepower, jet-engine flying Gravity suit, set a new world record for the "fastest speed in a body controlled jet engine powered suit."He achieved a speed of 32.02 mph over a lake at Lagoona Park in Reading, England, according to Guinness World Records.Browning told ABC News that in March 2016, he started tossing around an idea: "Could you approach the challenge of human flight in an entirely different way by augmenting the human body with power, with horsepower? ... Rather than putting the human being inside a flight machine."That question was the starting point for his flying suit."This started out as, I suppose, an opportunity to go and try and achieve something that hadn't been done before," he said. "It was the challenge really. The sheer hell of the challenge. ... Learning from failure has been the fuel that's driven our journey."At the time, Browning was working for an oil company, handling oil trading and implementing new technology. In his free time, though, he pursued several projects."I suppose that throughout my life, especially as a kid, I used to enjoy making things, taking things apart, visiting my father in a workshop," he told ABC News. "I suppose that I have always been quite technically minded in, at least, my day job career."He described the jet-suit as a project that "got slightly out of hand."First, he started with one small gas turbine attached to arm mounts. Eight months later, at a nearby farm, he had a breakthrough when he attached an engine to each leg and two turbines on each arm. He managed six seconds of controlled, stable flight. Later, he added two more turbines.The current jet suit includes six turbines, a fuel system and an electronic control system."Core to this journey has been ... a very strong ethos, very close to my heart, around having an idea and spending less time agonizing over whether it's going to be possible and more time about finding some way of turning that idea, that concept into something tangible and go and test it," he said, "and learn from that testing."His company, Gravity Industries, made a deal with its first investor in early 2017 and has already sold a copy of the original jet suit.Browning said that while the Marvel character Iron Man had not been the original start point for the jet suit, he remains a fan and loved that people made that connection with it."It is wonderful, especially with kids," he said. "They draw this great parallel."His goal, Browning added, is to make flying a reality for more people."I know we're only at the beginning of this journey," he said. "I can't help but be quite excited about the journey we're on. It's a pleasure."
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  • shironosov/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In a breakthrough treatment, researchers at a burn unit in Germany found a way to replace 80 percent of a boy’s skin using a combination of gene therapy and stem cells. The grafted skin attached to his body has continued to replace itself, even months later.The patient –- a boy who was 7 years old at the time of the treatment –- was born with a rare skin condition called junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The condition causes the outer layer of the skin to peel away easily from the lower skin layers, making it incredibly fragile and prone to injury.“This is a very severe, devastating disease, where kids suffer a lot,” said Dr. Michele De Luca, one of the authors of the research.Experts not involved in the research have said this successful grafting treatment is a big step for those suffering from genetic skin conditions like this one.“This is really quite exciting, to have this translation for these patients,” said Dr. Dennis Orgill, medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Wound Center in Boston, who was not involved with the study. "That they can do these genetic manipulations and then have a long term result, which they’ve demonstrated here, is a major breakthrough."In this case, the treatment may have been lifesaving. The patient arrived at the hospital with a life-threatening bacterial skin infection spread over much of his body. Over the following weeks, his doctors tried everything they could to treat him without success.Out of options, his treatment team was preparing to start end-of-life care when his parents pleaded with them to try an experimental therapy.Surgeons in Germany took a sample of the boy’s skin, less than one square inch in size, that was unharmed by the bacterial infection. In a lab, researchers infected the skin biopsy with a virus specially designed to alter the genetic code within the skin cells, “correcting” the mutation responsible for his fragile skin. The researchers "grew" the skin and used it to surgically replace the patient’s blistered and destroyed skin.After 21 months, the new skin is regenerating itself without problems and has been resilient; it can hold up to normal wear much better than his original skin.While this result only applies to one rare skin disorder right now, experts said the approach could be used more widely for other diseases in the future.“We are running other clinical trials on other kinds of junctional epidermolysis bullosa," De Luca said. "In the future, it could be applied to other genetic diseases of the skin.”Researchers hope that it could help other people with seriously damaged skin in the future, too.“This technology could be extended into other patients with genetic conditions, or patients with extensive burns,” Orgill said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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