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  • iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- Shocking videos showing high school cheerleaders in Colorado being forced into splits sparked outrage this summer, and now officials say no criminal charges will be filed.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- California has declared a state of emergency over a hepatitis A outbreak that health officials say is the largest person-to-person outbreak in the U.S. since a vaccine became available over 20 years ago.
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  • Kelly Murphy(CAMDEN, N.J.) -- Toni Murphy was just 36 when she died in 2001, leaving behind five children, including 2-year-old quadruplet daughters.Now, Toni Murphy’s quadruplet daughters, Erin, Kelly, Rachel and Casey Murphy, are 18-year-old college freshman fulfilling their mom’s legacy.Three of the sisters are studying nursing at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey. Erin Murphy is studying veterinary medicine at Oklahoma State University.Toni Murphy worked as a nurse for more than a decade before she died of complications from an infection.“I wanted to follow in my mom’s footsteps,” Casey Murphy told ABC News. “My dad tells us stories a lot and [it was] just something that I wanted to do.”The sisters’ father, Michael Murphy, raised the four girls and their older sister, Lyn, 31, on his own after his wife died.“I’ve got pictures of her up around the house and would always say, ‘Your mother used to do this,’” he said of keeping Toni Murphy’s memory alive. “I kept those stories going to make sure that they knew that she was part of their lives even though they don’t remember too much of it.”Toni Murphy worked in obstetrics and was also an elementary school nurse and a prison nurse, according to her family.“Ever since I knew about nurses, I always just wanted to be one,” said Rachel Murphy. “Since I was little, I’ve always wanted to help people.”Toni Murphy’s daughters each have their own dreams of what they want to do in the medical field. Kelly Murphy is considering becoming a doctor, Casey Murphy wants to work in pediatrics and find a cure for cancer, Rachel Murphy wants to be a flight trauma nurse and Erin Murphy wants to become a veterinarian.Their older sister, Lyn Murphy, also works in the medical field as an X-ray technician in New Jersey."I wanted to follow in the footsteps of both of them," Kelly Murphy said of her mom and older sister. "I just had this passion for helping people and I’m really interested in the human body and how it works."Michael Murphy said he watched his daughters fall in love with the medical field after shadowing nurses and doctors while in high school.“It’s nice that they’ve embraced the fact that [their mom] was a nurse and wanted to honor her in that way,” Michael Murphy said. “I never forced them … they fell in love with it.”Rachel, Casey and Kelly Murphy commute to Rutgers from their family's home in Swedesboro, New Jersey. The three sisters take the same schedule of classes and rely on the same built-in study group that helped them thrive in high school.“I don’t think we mean to be competitive but we push each other to do the best we can and we’re always anxious to see who did the best,” Rachel Murphy said. “We don’t think of it as competitive but it just kind of happens to be that way.”
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  • Jackie Alexander(SALT LAKE CITY) -- A Utah school's camera captured the emotional moment when an 11-year-old student learned that she was going to be adopted by her foster family.Tannah Butterfield leaped into the arms of her school's office manager, Jackie Alexander, after hearing the news."All that excitement, joy and happiness that you see in Tannah went right through to me," Alexander, 45, told ABC News on Tuesday. "We could not quit embracing. She just held me tight. It was pure joy at its finest."Alexander, an employee at American Heritage of South Jordan in Utah, said she's known Tannah, a sixth-grade student, for nearly two years."She's just one that I've made a little bond with and it's lasted," Alexander said.On Oct. 2, Alexander received a phone call from Jen Fisher, Tannah's foster mom, and asked her to share the good news with Tannah that she and her husband, Jeff, would be officially adopting her.The Fishers had been Tannah's foster parents for two years."[Jen Fisher] had called to tell me that everything had went well in court that day, that Jeff and her were going to adopt her and the rights were [removed] from the biological parents," Alexander said. "She was just so worried and didn't want her to wait any longer, so that's where I got to play a small part."Jen Fisher of West Jordan, Utah, told ABC News that seeing Tannah's reaction on video was priceless."We were just shocked," Jen Fisher said. "I did not expect that from Tannah. It was amazing."In addition to adopting Tannah, the Fishers will also be adopting her siblings, Teagun, 6 and Tallie, 2, as well.The children will join the Fishers' biological son and daughter Aiden, 13 and Macy, 10."We just loved them so much," Fisher said. "My husband and I had a lot of infertility problems and we had wanted more.""This kind of fell on our lap," she added.The couple said they hope the adoption will be finalized next month.
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  • CHP - Golden Gate Division (SANTA ANA, Calif.) -- Wildfires have swept through California, killing at least 15 people and injuring over 100.With thousands of acres burned and the fires still raging, here's how you can help those affected by the blazes.Facebook has created exclusive Crisis Response Centers for three of the fires -- the Sulphur Fire, the Tubbs Fire and the Atlas Fire.If you want to volunteer to help, you can let the community of the Crisis Response Center know that you're looking to participate in volunteer efforts.The Crisis Response Centers also allow people to start a fundraiser or donate to ongoing fundraisers. They also serve as a resource to view information about the wildfires, including local news reports and updates, as well as photos that other Facebook users in the area are posting of the devastation.The online centers also allow you to check in, letting your Facebook friends know you're safe if you're living in the affected areas, or allow you to make sure that your friends in those areas are safe.You can also help by making donations.The Center for International Disaster Information, which is part of USAID and focuses on informing people about the most effective ways to support international disaster relief and recovery, recommends monetary contributions because they let relief organizations urgently purchase the supplies they need."Cash donations allow relief supplies to be purchased near the disaster site, avoiding delays, and steep transportation and logistical costs that can encumber material donations," CIDI's website notes.Additionally, the organization recommends making sure that the money donated is going to vetted relief agencies.To ensure that you're contributing to established agencies, you can visit an organization like Charity Navigator or GiveWell, which monitor charities, making it easier to determine where to send your money securely.The American Red Cross is among established relief organizations that are highly rated by Charity Navigator. The Red Cross is working to provide shelter, food and comfort to those that had to flee their neighborhoods in the affected wildfire areas.
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