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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) -- Parents and children learning about the bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, may find the violence especially troubling since the terror attack targeted a venue full of children and adolescents.Disturbing news can be hard for parents to grasp, much less explain to curious children. Young people also consume their own media through Facebook and Twitter and may form their own impressions, leaving parents concerned about how to best provide support amid the frightening news.Experts advise parents not to avoid difficult topics, but instead engage their children to help them make sense of scary events.Dr. David Palmiter, professor of psychiatry at Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and author of "Dr. David Palmiter's Blog for Hectic Parents" advises moms and dads to prepare themselves before rushing to their children’s rescue."We have to acknowledge our own craziness. No engaged parent is happier than their least happy child," said Palmiter. "If my kid is hurting, then as a loving-slash-crazy parent, what I want to do is jump in and make them stop. That has an effect, dampening the dialogue and losing the opportunity to have a kid learn how to cope with painful thoughts and feelings."Instead, Palmiter recommends parents assess their own reactions and deal with their own distress early, like the airplane emergency instructions for adults to secure their own oxygen masks before helping children."I want to prepare myself as a parent to listen, to get a full vetting before I say word one," he said.Kids can have various reactions to trauma, he said, and advises that parents allow children guide the conversation."I would let the kids know that they’re willing, available and interested to talk about it if the kids would like to talk about it," Palmiter said. "Sometimes kids are like adults; they cope by not talking about things."The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting exposure to media violence, which can cause further trauma. Very young children may not understand that they are seeing the same event over and over and instead experience each replay as a separate horrific event.When children are ready, Palmiter recommends reflective listening plus empathy to generate what he calls "companioning," or listening side-by-side. If they ask for information, Palmiter advises selecting what to tell children based on their age and developmental stage. Well-adjusted adolescents can even help out parents by listening to the fears of their mother or father."The older the child, the more developmentally healthy the child, the more I’m going to be talking about my own pain," he said.But Palmiter warns against fudging the truth with kids."I’m never going to say anything untrue because that will damage my credibility, because it will stop them from coming to me," he said.Warning signs that a child is not coping well with a traumatic event or news may become apparent."The only time I worry is if a kid starts changing in their ability to meet developmental targets," he said. Some examples are missing sleep, eating poorly or changing behaviors around friends and at school. Mild to moderate cases normally settle down in a week or two. Beyond that, Dr. Palmiter suggests seeking professional help.The American Psychological Association (APA) also advises parents to take action to life children's spirits. This can include giving back to the community, donating to those affected by tragedy or other good acts.Robin Gurwich, a psychologist at Duke University, said in an earlier interview that getting involved in either a faith-based community service, talking to a friend or seeking professional help can all be ways to cope with frightening news.She also advised taking breaks from watching the news."You can bear witness and do something and taking a break from it, it doesn’t mean you’re uncaring," she said in an interview last year. "W
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  • Denise/S.L. Bradley (AUSTIN, Texas) -- Texas high school student Chase Bradley wasn't just inspired to raise money for cancer research. He also donated his scholarship money to a fellow student who had recently overcome the disease.Chase, 17, a junior at Hyde Park High School in Austin, Texas, gave away his prize to survivor Sergio Garcia, 18, since his sister, Hunter Bradley, also beat cancer five years ago."I remember my dad told me, 'Chase, your sister has cancer,'" Chase told ABC News. "I didn't know what it meant at the time. I didn't know what it meant for a family. I remember being in my her hospital room, trying to keep a straight face and not cry in front of her. It was a very heartbreaking setting. I gave my sister a hug and it was very overwhelming."This year, Chase joined 13 other students in the Austin area to raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.Chase was awarded the $2,500 scholarship money after raising $57,000 for the society in seven weeks."He started a letter writing campaign, phone calls, emails, social media and reached out to friends and family and a lot of people who have followed our daughter's story," Chase's mom, Denise Bradley, told ABC News.The fundraiser was part of his school’s “Student of the Year” competition. Chase said he knew he was going to give the $2,500 away to a cancer survivor even before he won the scholarship."I knew I couldn't keep this scholarship because cancer -- it doesn't impact just that one person," he said. "The last thing they want to worry about in fighting cancer is having enough money to go to college."After receiving the scholarship, Chase and his family asked the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to help identify a high school student area who had battled cancer and could benefit form having a college scholarship.The society connected Chase to Sergio Garcia. Sergio was diagnosed with leukemia in 2013, but has been cancer-free for almost two years, he told ABC News.On May 8, Chase handed the scholarship over to Sergio during an end-of-the-year awards ceremony at Hyde Park High School."It was just absolutely moving," said Denise Bradley. "Chase called Sergio to stand up next to him and told Sergio he respected and admired his strength during his cancer battle and he handed the scholarship over to him."Chase's father, S.L. Bradley, said he was pleased with his son's kind act."He was sacrificing for a greater cause," S.L. Bradley told ABC News. "Because of this, I was really proud of what he's done."Sergio said he was very grateful to accept Chase's scholarship."It was something really nice that he did for me and I didn't even know him," he added. "We've become really good friends after that. [I plan] to pay some of my tuition for college."Sergio will attend Austin Community College in the fall to study architecture before transferring to a 4-year institution, he said.
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  • SWNS.com(MANCHESTER, England) -- The day after a devastating bombing in Manchester killed at least 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert, officials and parents alike are grappling with the news that many of the injured and killed were young adolescents or children.U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called the bombing a "sickening attack" that targeted children and young people "who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives.""We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherished but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.The first two victims identified were just 8 and 18 years old, and at least 12 children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said.
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  • ABCNews.com(GRIFFIN, Ga.) -- It was an emotional moment when special education teacher Kimberly Wimbish surprised her student, Jamias Howard, 19, with his graduation cap and gown -- an accomplishment that certainly had its challenges along the way.“Oh man, thank you,” Howard told Wimbish in her touching Facebook video that has now gone viral.“Congratulations,” she replied through the car window.“Appreciate it, ma’am. I love you so much,” said an overwhelmed Howard. “Thank you so much for everything you do for me. Appreciate it.”After his devoted teacher reminded him about his graduation rehearsal at 8 a.m., Howard can be seen wiping away tears as he once again told her, “I love you so much.”Getting to this heartwarming moment was no easy feat for these two, however.“Jamias has had his challenges. He had additional challenges that wouldn’t afford him the opportunity to come to school to be educated,” Wimbish, a teacher at Griffin High School in Georgia, told ABC News. “I saw need, and I was able to fulfill that need. I had no problems volunteering to try to help him graduate.”So that’s exactly what she did, meeting Howard for private tutoring after she finished teaching a full school day.“We’d meet at the local library or a local park or Burger King, wherever he could walk to,” she said. “We’d go through lessons and I’d grade him and I’d teach him. He really worked. When I found out he had enough credits, I was just about to explode with excitement.”Wimbish is used to dealing with difficult student situations, but Howard was a “very special case,” she said.“It was like he didn’t trust anyone and he had up a wall. And before you got him, he was gonna get you,” she explained. “It was a challenge. It looked like he was never going to graduate, like he wasn’t going to be able to pull it together. All I could see was things not going well for him from that point on, had he not been given an opportunity to get it right, been given another chance.”She so badly wanted to afford him that opportunity, and after a few minor setbacks, “He put in his time, and he worked, and I worked, and Lord knows it was a challenge, but it was well worth it,” said the determined teacher.Howard is now graduating high school on Saturday, proudly walking across the stage in his hand-delivered cap and gown.“Everything he’s been through, the challenges he’s faced, he’s going to be happy,” she proudly said of her student. “I had no idea he would get so emotional. He always tried to be a tough guy, but I had to break those walls down.”Now Howard is going to have a whole crowd of people cheering him on from the stands.“So many people have reached out to me,” said Wimbish. “They want to come to crowd the stadium in an uproar when they announce Jamias’ name. I’m just going to be happy for him and his mother.”But it will be a proud mother moment for Wimbish too, whose own son is also graduating in the same ceremony.“I feel like I have two sons graduating,” she said.
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  • Photo Magic Media(BOWIE, Md.) -- One nursing student, who is set to graduate Tuesday, was inspired to choose the selfless profession after her open heart surgery 10 years ago.That's when Linette Iloh met two nurses who had a profound impact on her life.The Bowie State University senior originally intended to be a lawyer. But that changed when she was studying at Coppin State University in Baltimore, Maryland, on a full softball scholarship."I fell ill," the Bowie, Maryland, student recalled. "I was sleeping all day."Iloh, 27, would later discover that she had pericarditis, or an enlarged heart, and needed immediate open heart surgery at only 18 years old. A specialist referred her to Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park, Maryland, where she underwent surgery on November 23, 2007."I had two of the best nurses," Iloh said of her five-day stint in the hospital.Two nurses helped her with different tests before surgery, prayed with her before the surgery and even ensured she ate at the appropriate time the night before her surgery, Iloh said. They also kept her mother up to date on the very latest, she added.Iloh remembers one particular nurse whose face was the first she saw after the anesthesia wore off from her surgery."She was holding my hand," she said, emphatically. "It was the emotional support I needed because I didn't know what was going on. I had a breathing tube and she was there to calm me down. That's all I remember."Her nurses also pushed her to walk the day after surgery. Iloh added, "They pushed me even though I didn’t want to. They made me get up and eat and interact with other patients."Iloh said the surgery was "an eye-opener that life is really short." It also made her change her mind about becoming a lawyer. Instead, she wanted to now become a nurse."It made me think of nurses different. I never thought that nurses impacted people’s lives like that," Iloh said. "I knew they provided care, but I didn’t know they provided emotional support. I wanted to give that feeling to somebody else in the future."“It is truly heartening to know Linette is not only living a full life after her heart surgery but also that the care she received from nurses here at Washington Adventist Hospital could lead her to such a fulfilling career. We are so pleased to hear that she will go on to spread the kind of compassionate care that made a difference to her as a patient,” said Amy Dukovcic, a heart care nurse practitioner, who oversees one of the nurses who cared for Iloh, Elena Agatep.Iloh will graduate from Bowie State University Tuesday with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. She already had her pinning ceremony last Thursday in which she had to take the Nightingale Pledge, named after iconic nurse Florence Nightingale.The graduating student, who's currently working at Anne Arundel Medical Center, said she hopes to work in pediatric care going forward."My true passion is children. I'm excited to hopefully get a job [in that field]. Once I get that I'm going to be just over the moon," she said.
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