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  • Tibrina Hobson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- One of America’s favorite TV doctors may have met her match.“I ended up finding this amazing doctor here in L.A. who is kind of a total Addison and I say that only because I’m like I can't believe I kind of found an Addison. I love her so much and she's so cool and so knowledgeable and so fierce and amazing,” Kate Walsh said of her doctor on a recent episode of ABC Radio’s "No Limits With Rebecca Jarvis."The actress, known for playing the fashionable and brilliant Dr. Addison Montgomery on ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” recently revealed that she was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2015.“I refer to it as ‘before tumor’ [and] ‘after tumor’, BT and AT. … I think most people who go through you know a major health scare or crisis like that, it's very cliche and trite but it forces you to really sort of assess your life if you haven’t already,” Walsh said of the experience.After having the lemon-sized tumor removed, it was found to be benign but the memory of that uncertainty is something that Walsh will never forget.“When I was going into surgery and I didn't know what was going to happen, I just had that real, I call it, like, a God moment or a very special moment, like, 'Well this is it, I've had a great run and if not I just want to do stuff that I love.'”From that moment forward she said she has been focused on doing projects she loves with people she loves and living life to the fullest. Another change for the actress is her approach to health. Walsh admitted that she “never used a regular GP [General Practioner],” but has since changed her ways and stresses the importance of a patient-doctor relationship.“I think that [what] people don't consider when they go to doctors is you can actually develop a great relationship with your doctor. You can find one that you really love and I think that's important to do,” Walsh said.So why now, two years post-surgery, has Walsh decided to speak out?“I didn't want to talk about initially because I wanted to have my own experience of recovery but I really was always intent on wanting to partner with someone just to share and talk about my experience,” she said.She found that partner in Cigna as part of their TV Doctors campaign. Walsh joins Patrick Dempsey, Neil Patrick Harris, Donald Faison and Jane Seymour to encourage Americans to get the preventative care they need in the form of annual check-ups.“Find your Addison … I did … she's awesome,” Walsh said.Hear her full episode on ABC Radio’s “No Limits With Rebecca Jarvis."
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  • Kristie Fudge(HOUSTON) -- Kristie Fudge did not even realize her only child’s baby photo album was missing after flooding from Hurricane Harvey ruined her family’s Baytown, Texas, home last month.“We haven’t even started our list of everything that we lost because we’re still trying to clean out the house,” Fudge, a high school teacher, told ABC News. “If you stand at the front door, you can see all the way to the back closet in the back of the house.”Fudge, 40, was surprised to get a phone call on Tuesday from a childhood friend who saw a photo album that might belong to her posted on a local Baytown Facebook group. The friend recognized Fudge’s childhood home in a photo and gave Fudge the phone number that was posted on Facebook with the photos.A few hours later, Fudge had in her hands a photo album that showed the first week of life of her 12-year-old daughter, Hannah.The album was found around five blocks from Fudge’s house in a park by Baytown city employee Jesse Martinez.“Like everyone said, we could have thrown it out but no," Martinez told local ABC station KTRK. "It's somebody's baby pictures. They were older pictures. It's nothing digital. It's nothing you can print out on a camera now."Martinez brought the album back to his office where he and colleagues found Fudge’s name on the back of one photo. They used a magnifying glass to identify her name on the medical bracelet she wore while she was in the hospital for Hannah’s birth.“Hannah is the only grandkid in the family,” Fudge said. “If [Jesse] didn’t find that baby book, we wouldn’t have pictures of her being born and my parents getting to hold their only grandbaby in their arms.”She continued, “It goes to show the testament of Baytown, of the whole Houston area, and how we really do stick together as friends helping friends, just people doing the right thing.”The Texas Division of Emergency Management estimates that more than 160,000 homes were damaged or destroyed during Harvey. The storm hit Texas as a Category 4 hurricane and dumped record-breaking levels of rain on Houston and the surrounding areas.Fudge described the return of Hannah's baby album as a "true treasure" while she struggles to rebuild her family's home.The photo album had water damage but all the photos of Hannah survived intact."When she found out it was her baby album, she got teary-eyed," Fudge said of her daughter. "She was totally grateful."She added, "We have just pure gratefulness and overwhelming joy of knowing complete strangers would go out of their way to help a fellow person and not kick them when they’re down or throw away precious memories."
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  • Courtesy Montana Brown(ATLANTA) -- This week, Montana Brown started working as a staff nurse in Atlanta, Georgia.It was a dream finally realized for the 24-year-old, two-time childhood cancer survivor from Atlanta.Brown is not just any new nurse at the AFLAC Cancer Center though, she's also a former patient there.When she was 2 years old, Brown was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare type of childhood cancer of the connective tissue. She underwent chemotherapy for a year at the AFLAC Cancer Center. All the while, she said, her parents tried to help her have a normal life, watching movies while she was in the hospital.By the time, Brown reached high school, she had been active in competitive gymnastics and competitive cheerleading for years. Then the family got some shocking news at the end of Brown's freshman year: The 15-year-old had cancer again."I had just tried out for my high school cheerleading team," she said. "I actually ran a mile while I had cancer and had no idea. ... There weren't symptoms but my mom and dad could tell that something was different about me and they knew that something was a little off."She went to the hospital every week, she said. Brown underwent chemotherapy again and radiation. She also learned from doctors that she'd have to stop gymnastics and cheerleading."The nurses here, as great as they were when I was 2 -- from what my mom says -- they were extremely loving and caring and compassionate. And, just the love they showed me and my family in our time of need just really helped me," she said. "It helped me want to become as kind and as caring and as compassionate as they were for me."Brown said it was those encounters she had as a toddler and then years later as a high school student that pushed her to decide nursing was her calling."[In nursing school,] I would always say, 'I'm only going to nursing school to do pediatric oncology, like I don't want to do anything else. I don't want to work anywhere else. I'm going to school strictly to do pediatric oncology.' And so it's kind of crazy how full circle it's come so far."Now, Brown said, she hopes to be a source of hope and inspiration for children battling cancer at the AFLAC Cancer Center."I really wanted to be that person where when I said, 'Hey, I totally understand. This is where I was. This is where I am now.' That me and my patients would form a bond," she said. "I'm not walking through the doors as a patient anymore. I am walking through as a staff member."
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  • Environmental Protection Agency(HOUSTON) -- At least one Superfund site was damaged and leaked toxic chemicals in Texas, despite early information that the sites were secure, the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed Thursday.New test results found very high levels of chemicals called dioxins around the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site in Channelview. The EPA previously said that the site needed further investigation, which was ongoing, but an armored "cap" intended to contain the waste should have prevented any toxic material from leaking. Part of this site is always underwater but after Hurricane Harvey flooding was up to 12 to 14 feet.Dioxins can cause cancer and reproductive problems, as well as damage the immune system, according to the EPA. Low levels of dioxin have detected in the river before and humans can be exposed to it by swimming or eating seafood from the water, according to the Galveston Bay Foundation.Thursday's testing results released by EPA found levels at 70,000 nanograms per kilogram, more than 2,000 times the recommended level of 30 ng/kg, according to an EPA press release. The toxic chemical that leaked does not dissolve in water and could continue to spread. The company responsible for the site will continue to conduct testing in the area.The San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site was contaminated with waste from paper manufacturing and was added to the Superfund list in 2008. The site was stabilized in 2011, according to the regional administrator, but it is still listed as one of the most contaminated sites in the country.The companies considered potentially responsible for the pollution are also responsible for maintaining the site. On Sept. 9, EPA said they were using heavy equipment to cover the cap with rock and removed nine truckloads containing 45,000 gallons of stormwater from the area.ABC News' Kenneth Moton visited the San Jacinto site with EPA and local officials on Sept. 4 after some of the flooding receded. At that time the acting regional administrator for that area, Sam Coleman, said teams were working to inspect and repair the cap but they were pretty confident there were no leaks and that the San Jacinto site was secure before the storm hit.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Puerto Rico is virtually without power or cell service after Hurricane Maria barreled through the island, leaving those searching for loved ones in a shroud of uncertainty.Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said the island is facing an "unprecedented disaster" after the storm made landfall as a powerful Category 4 hurricane last week.While about 5 percent of electricity had been restored across the island by Monday night, generators remain the only source of power for more than 3 million American citizens.The storm killed at least 16 and left the island littered with rubble from demolished homes and downed trees and power lines.How to help relief efforts
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