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  • UCLA Health(LOS ANGELES) -- For years, Justin Cho's family thought they simply had a happy kid who liked to laugh, even when nothing funny happened.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Taking birth control pills has previously been associated with several non-contraceptive benefits. But now, a new study shows the pill can help protect women from certain cancers for decades after a woman stops taking it."This latest study reinforces what we have known for decades," ABC's Chief Women's Health Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton said on Good Morning America Friday. "But this study represented the longest follow up." "[Researchers] looked at 46,000 women, followed them up to 44 years and found that the risks of certain types of cancers were dramatically reduced. We're talking lower risk of ovarian cancer, lower risk of endometrial cancer -- which is a type of uterine cancer -- and lower risk of colorectal cancer," she added.On the flip side, Ashton noted that taking the pill does slightly increase the risk of developing a blood clot."Some studies, though not this one, have shown a slight increase in the risk of cervical cancer and breast cancer but the breast cancer risk returns back to baseline after a woman stops taking the pill," she added.If you choose not to take birth control pills, there are other ways of reducing cancer risks. Ashton said pregnancy lowers the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer; avoiding obesity lowers the risks of ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancer; and taking an aspirin can lower the risk of colorectal cancer.New data also shows that removing the fallopian tubes can cut the risk of ovarian cancer, she said.
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  • WABC-TV(NEW YORK) -- A teen born with a birth defect that prevented him from walking is now getting used to moving around on his own thanks to state-of-the-art prosthetic devices.Christian Calamuci, 17, was born in South Africa with legs that bowed out dramatically, making it impossible to walk for long periods of time, according to New York ABC station WABC-TV."I couldn't stand for more than two minutes, I couldn't run," Christian told WABC. "My legs, they didn't bend."Laura Calamuci, of Staten Island, New York, adopted the boy from a South African orphanage as a child, according to WABC.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WILMINGTON, N.C.) -- A Wilmington, North Carolina, mom took the day of her daughter's adoption as an opportunity to recognize the many people who were part of the journey."I met her the day she came into foster care," Millie Holloman said of daughter Vera Wren Holloman, 5. "She was placed with another woman but I would watch her from time to time. I told the agency if she ever needed another placement or her case flipped to adoption, I wanted her."Holloman had just become licensed to foster and was working with the Bair Foundation. One of the women in the adoption-day photo shoot is Hilary Smith, the woman from that agency who had spent Vera Wren's very first night in foster care with her."She [Vera Wren] was scared and Hilary helped her,” Holloman, 36, told ABC News. “She's also the one who introduced me to Wren.”Smith holds up a sign in the photo shoot that says, "Today I know that God is faithful."Holloman is also a photographer, and credits her sister-in-law with the idea of the photo shoot that included "the village," which is how Holloman refers to the group of people who made the adoption, and the adoption-day photo shoot, possible.There are many others: an aunt and uncle, supportive grandparents and cousins. But some of the most poignant photos are of those not typically seen in an adoption-day photo shoot.There's the social worker. The attorney. The judge who got to see a "happy ending.""It’s more than me and her," the single mom said. "There were so many other people involved."More happy news for the Holloman family: Vera Wren is about to get a little brother. His adoption is expected to be finalized soon.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A warning by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has raised new concern about breast implants risks and the possibility of developing a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma, or ALCL.Here's the key information about the new warning:When did the FDA first discover the link?The FDA first noticed a possible association between breast implants and ALCL, a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, in 2011."Women considering breast implants should be aware of the very small, but increased risk of developing ALCL and discuss it with a physician," Dr. Binita Ashar, a physician and FDA scientist studying these cancer cases, said in a statement on the FDA website in 2011.Ashar said, at the time, that most women were diagnosed with cancer years after surgery when they noticed changes in the look and feel of the area around the breast implant. They did not have enough cases then to determine a certain connection.After further research, the FDA announced Tuesday that, in rare cases, they believe breast implants can lead to the development of ALCL.How many women have been affected?The risk of ALCL remains rare even in women with breast implants. The FDA so far has found 359 reports of women developing breast cancer-associated ALCL, including nine deaths. The majority of women who developed the cancer, 208, had a textured type of implant rather than a smooth implant. Additionally, 186 of the women who developed ALCL had implants filled with silicone versus 126 who had implants filled with saline.An estimated 1.7 million breast implantation surgeries were completed in the U.S. alone between 2011 and 2016, according to the American Society for Plastic Surgeons, so the risk remains low."All of the information to date suggests that women with breast implants have a very low, but increased risk of developing ALCL compared to women who do not have breast implants," FDA officials said on their website. "Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL are treated by removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant and some cases have been treated by chemotherapy and radiation."What to know for women who already have breast implantsThe FDA stressed that those with breast implants do not need to change routine care and medical follow-ups. However, the FDA continues to recommend women with silicone implants have MRI scans to detect any potential rupturing -- and consult with a doctor if they notice any physical changes around the implant site.ABC News' Chief Women's Health Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton said that people with implants should be informed of the potential risks, but stressed that breast implantation surgery is generally safe."An increased risk of a rare event is still a rare event," Ashton said Wednesday on ABC News' Good Morning America.What to know for women considering breast implantsThe FDA suggests patient should research thoroughly before having breast implants.Women considering implants should also remember they will likely need additional procedures or replacement in the future. They should research the range of different products, communicate with a surgeon and understand long-term risks, before deciding to have the surgery, and monitor any adverse reactions after.More information can be found on the FDA website.
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