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  • Courtesy Michael Graydon(MOODY, Ala.) -- A 2-year-old Alabama girl has a new lease on life thanks to a kidney donation from her 62-year-old grandmother, who was a perfect match.Wryn Graydon of Moody, Alabama, was diagnosed at 2 months old with congenital nephrotic syndrome, a rare kidney disorder that the National Institutes of Health says is caused by genetic defects.Wryn had both of her kidneys removed two months after the diagnosis and then was put on dialysis at home, her father, Michael Graydon, said.As doctors waited for Wryn to be old enough and strong enough for a kidney transplant, her family wondered whether any among them would be able to donate their own kidney.“Everybody wanted to be a match so bad,” Graydon told ABC News. “My wife [Haley] and I didn’t know who to choose to get tested first. I had kidney stones so I knew I wouldn’t be a possibility and my wife was the primary caregiver, so they wouldn’t let her do it.”Graydon’s parents, Carol and Mike Graydon, were among the first family members to be tested. After a false-positive test result for Mike Graydon, it was Carol Graydon, 62, who came back as a perfect match for her granddaughter.Carol Graydon’s good health -- she was told she had the kidneys of a 20-year-old -- allowed her to move forward as Wryn’s donor.“Having a living and a related donor allowed us to schedule the transplant as quickly as possible,” said Dr. Dan Feig, division director of Pediatric Nephrology at University of Alabama in Birmingham, who treated Wryn. “A very, very healthy 62-year-old is terrific so we were thrilled to be able to move forward.”Graydon found out his mom could be Wryn’s kidney donor when Carol Graydon, who lives about two hours away in Greenville, Alabama, surprised him at work to share the news.“There are so many emotions that hit you,” he said. “We’re big believers in God so we trust in him. But from the medical side we know what can go wrong and this was my mom and daughter.”Carol Graydon and Wryn underwent their kidney transplant last week at neighboring hospitals in Birmingham. While Graydon waited at the bedside of Wryn, his father texted him updates from Carol Graydon’s surgery.“He was sending me texts, ‘The incision is done. The kidney is out and headed your way,’” Graydon recalled.After the nearly three-hour procedure, the kidney transplant between grandmother and granddaughter was declared a success.“When my mom was able to come over in her wheelchair and see Wryn, it’s almost like they had some type of immediate connection,” Graydon said. “They were already close to begin with but Wryn just perked up that day and was very happy and laughing and being her normal self after seeing my mom.”Wryn is awaiting discharge from the hospital and then will go home to live a normal life, without the constraints of dialysis. An average kidney transplant lasts 15 years so Wryn will likely need another transplant but is now doing “terrifically well,” Dr. Feig said.Carol Graydon is now recovering at home and dealing with a side effect of being a kidney donor, exhaustion, according to her son. But the family is also bracing for a positive side effect from Wryn’s receiving a kidney: energy.“We’re excited about it but also scared,” Graydon said of him and his wife, who also have a 5-year-old daughter. “She was already our wild child.”
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  • Walter Fisher(NEW YORK) -- A professional poker player shed 70 pounds after his buddies bet him $1 million that he could not drop down to just 10 percent body fat in six months.Walter Fisher, 36, said that he blamed his recent weight gain on the fact that he mostly worked in a casino, telling ABC News, "They have all these amazing, wonderful, rich restaurants and I just started ordering by the truckload: veal Parmesan, pastas.""The weight piled on," he said. "I was looking in the mirror and I didn't know who this person was."Fisher said that eight months ago he tipped the scale at 245 pounds. Around the same time, he said a few big losses at the poker table left him more than half a million dollars in debt.Some of his gambling buddies then challenged him with a $1 million bet that he could not get his body down to just 10 percent body fat in six months.Fisher says he went "all-in," hitting the gym for up to 10 hours a day and eating clean. He even hired a personal trainer, Chris DiVecchio."He was down, down on his luck," DiVecchio, the owner of Premier Mind & Body in Los Angeles, said of Fisher at the time they started working together. "But at the same time I could see that light behind his eyes."After five-and-a-half months of grueling hard work, Fisher reached his goal and weighed-in at 175 pounds. He also walked away with $600,000.People with financial motivation are five times more likely to meet their weight-loss goals than people without a cash incentive, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.Fisher said for him, however, that money wasn't the main motivator that helped him lose weight, saying that he wanted to be someone his young nephews and nieces could look up to."I wanted to be around my nephews and nieces and ... give them .. the uncle they should look up to, not somebody who is a mess," Fisher said. "Money shouldn't be the motivating factor."Fisher said his life has changed for the better since his dramatic transformation, and adds that he thinks there is no way he'll ever gain that weight back. But if he does, he says he will just make another bet.
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  • Courtesy Courtney Gilmour(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- A magical day became even more magical for these kids thanks to some wonderful news from Mickey Mouse.
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  • Sally Hawkins/ABC News(BALTIMORE) -- Baby Charlie Gard’s parents have been locked in a bitter fight for their son’s future, not only for his survival against a debilitating disease, but against the London hospital where he has been a patient since he was just 2 months old and the British courts who say his condition is too grave to continue keeping him alive.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Summer is the season for having fun in the sun, but too much sun can lead to discomfort, burning and, in the worst case scenario, possibly skin cancer.Nearly five million people in the United States alone are treated each year for skin cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The best sunburn solution is to reapply a sunscreen with an SPF of 40 or higher regularly when enjoying time outdoors in the summer, according to Dr. Whitney Bowe, a New York City-based dermatologist.If you or your child ends up with a sunburn, quick, do-it-yourself fixes using items found in your own kitchen can help ease the pain of the burn and reinvigorate your skin.Bowe advises taking a multi-day approach to healing from overexposure to the sun.Immediately after getting a sunburn, Bowe recommends, take ibuprofen -- the liquid form for children and the pill for adults -- to help reduce the pain. She also advises drinking coconut water for hydration and to restore electrolytes.Days 1 and 2 post-sunburnBowe recommends using an oatmeal and honey concoction to soothe your skin.Mix honey and instant oatmeal together in a food processor, along with a few drops of water, to create a paste that will help calm and soothe your sunburned skin. Apply the paste on your burned skin and let it rest for 10 minutes before rinsing it off with cool water.Another way to use oatmeal is to fill a white cotton tube sock with oatmeal, tie the top with a rubber band, and let yourself soak with it in a bathtub. This will allow you to get the soothing benefits of oatmeal without having sticky clumps on your skin, Bowe said.Bowe also recommends applying whole milk to a sunburn on day one or two after getting a burn by soaking a wash cloth in cold milk with ice, wringing it out, and then putting the cloth over your body. The fats in the milk will create a soothing feeling on your skin, Bowe said."It's going to leave a film of healthy fats, healthy proteins [that] really speeds up the healing process," Bowe explained Friday on ABC News' Good Morning America.Days 3 and 4 post-sunburnBowe recommends using organic coconut oil on a burn a few days after the burn occurs because the oil acts as a soothing moisturizer.
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