Archives
  • Image Source White/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It can be easy to overindulge while traveling, but that may lead to feelings of regret once the vacation is over. How can we travel in a way where we maintain our balance and health. In the eighth episode of ABC News' "Healthy Living for Summer" series, we spoke with Julieanna Hever, a plant-based dietitian."If it's a really long flight I'll bring food with me, but if it's a short flight I'll eat when I get there," Hever said. "I'll eat whole foods as much as possible, not packaged foods which can be high in saturated fats, salts, sugars and oils."Below are a list of tips Hever gave ABC News.
    Read more...
  • gelmold/iStock/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- Cholera has infected half a million people in the Middle Eastern nation of Yemen so far this year, according to a statement released this week by the World Health Organization -- and an estimated 2,000 of those people have already died from it. Health officials say 5,000 people in this country continue to become infected each day.Below are answers provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to some of the more common questions about this ancient but nonetheless devastating disease.What is cholera?Cholera is an illness caused by the bacterium known as Vibrio cholerae. The infection can range from mild, with no apparent symptoms, to severe illness. Between 5 to 10 percent of those infected will suffer the worst effects of the disease, which include severe diarrhea, vomiting and leg cramps. In the most serious cases, these symptoms can rob a sufferer of his or her body fluids quickly, leading to severe dehydration and shock. In these cases, not seeking immediate treatment can ultimately lead to death.How does someone get cholera?The bacteria that leads to cholera is found in food or water that has been contaminated by the feces of an infected person. Because of this, cholera is most common and can spread more quickly in areas where water treatment, sanitation and hygiene practices are inadequate. Epidemics are more likely to happen in these regions because people are at greater risk of consuming food or water from sources that have been contaminated by the feces of an infected person.This bacteria can also be found in the environment such as in briny rivers and coastal waters.In addition, a notable but less common cause of cholera infection is consuming raw or undercooked shellfish. There have been a few documented cases of cholera infection after consumption of such preparations of shellfish from the Gulf of Mexico.The illness is not directly contagious from person to person. This means that you can come into contact with an infected person and not have a higher risk of becoming sick, so long as you do not consume contaminated food and water.How many people are affected worldwide?In a given year, researchers estimate that cholera is responsible for 3 to 5 million cases of illness and over 100,000 deaths worldwide.How long does it take to experience symptoms after you are infected?After infection, a person can experience symptoms anywhere from within a few hours to five days later. On average, symptoms typically appear in two to three days.Is it common in the U.S.?The spread of cholera in the U.S. is very rare today. The real risk is to those Americans who travel to areas where cholera epidemics are common. These areas include regions of Africa, Asia, and South and Central America. Travelers returning from these regions should also be careful about what they bring home since contaminated seafood has been known to cause outbreaks of cholera in the U.S.How is cholera treated?Treatment includes immediate replacement of fluid and salts that the body loses in diarrhea. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is a common form of treatment not only for cholera, but for other diarrheal illnesses worldwide. Typically, it contains a prepackaged mixture of sugar and salts that a person can mix with water. In severe cases of illness, an individual may need fluid replacement given through his or her veins (intravenous or IV fluids). When these simple treatments are employed, less than 1 percent of cholera-infected patients die.On occasion, doctors will use antibiotic treatment in cholera; however, this step is not considered as important as prompt rehydration.How can I avoid getting infected?Sticking to simple precautions while visiting regions where cholera is present keeps the risk for cholera infection very low. A few quick tips:•  Only drink bottled, boiled, or chemically treated water. You should also make sure the seal is intact on bottled or canned beverages that you drink. Avoid t
    Read more...
  • Siri Stafford/iStock/Thinkstock(EDMONTON, Alberta, Canada) -- A Canadian mother is hoping to bring awareness to the dangers of indoor heatstroke, which she said could have taken the life of her 3-year-old daughter.Jenn Abma of Edmonton, Alberta, told ABC News that she went upstairs to wake her toddler, Anastasia, from her hour-long nap on July 13. Abma said Anastasia was overheating in her bedroom and would not wake up."I had a gut feeling something was wrong," Abma recalled. "I went upstairs and it was extremely hot. It was like a sauna in there. The curtains were closed and the windows were open and she was in the direction of the direct sun. Being that hot outside, even with the window open, it's not circulation -- it's just heat."Abma, a mother of two, dialed 911 and EMS immediately arrived, she said. Anastasia's blood glucose level read below average, so first responders administered glucose liquid to raise the sugar in her body, according to Abma. Her body temperature reached 104 degrees Fahrenheit before EMS were able to cool the child down and she awoke minutes later, Abma said.According to Accuweather.com, the temperature in Edmonton was at a high of 84.2 degrees Fahrenheit on July 13, the day Anastasia was affected by heatstroke.Abma said she does not have an air conditioning unit in her home, but noted that it had never been an issue until now."This is her first summer in the house and I was unaware that bedroom got hotter than the rest," she added.The EMS of Alberta Health Services responded to Abma's call, she said. “Alberta Health Services EMS did respond to a call for Anastasia,” a spokeswoman told ABC News.Moments after EMS had answered Abma's emergency call, Abma said she snapped a photo of her daughter in the middle the ordeal."They [EMS] said, 'You should probably share this with your family and friends,' so they were there when I took the photo," Abma said.The next day, Abma shared the image on Instagram to raise parents' awareness of heatstroke dangers."No it is not my fault this happened to her but it is hard not to blame yourself, this is a lesson learnt [sic] & hopefully other parents can take something from this & make sure you are checking the rooms in your house because thy [sic] can be as dangerous as a hot car," Abma wrote on July 14. "Still I'm shook and I can't imagine what would have happened if I didn't go check on her."Abma said she has received mixed responses on the post about her daughter. She also said that she invested in an oscillating fan and heat-resistant curtains since the incident."People are [saying], 'How are you so stupid that you didn't know the bedroom was that hot?'" Abma said. "For every nasty comment, there's something positive though. It has done a lot of good and I am glad that I shared it, despite the rude things that have been said. It is that hot and it's going to be again. You hear about kids in hot cars dying daily, but to think this could happen in a bedroom ... I can't have someone else lose their baby and that's why I shared [Anastasia's] story."Dr. Venkatesh Bellamkonda, emergency medicine specialist of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said indoor heatstroke is possible depending on the conditions."Heatstroke is about being in a room or environment where the body temperature is forced to rise unnaturally," Bellamkonda told ABC News. "It can be in a boiler room, in a greenhouse, it can be in front of the sun. Heatstroke might be something other than the person's own body causing that temperature [to rise]."Bellamkonda said there are three different levels of heatstroke. The first is heat stress, where the body becomes uncomfortably warm. The second is heat exhaustion, where the body temperature rises above 100 degrees, water levels are decreased and the person begins to feel dehydrated and fatigued. And the final stage, the most dangerous, is when the body temperature rises to 104 degrees or above.
    Read more...
  • Purestock/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Amy Silverstein credits a group of nine friends with saving her life when she had her second lifesaving heart transplant at age 50.The friends, who came from different parts of Silverstein’s life and from around the country, cared for Silverstein, in her California hospital as she waited with a failing heart for her transplant to come through.The friends -- whose heroic efforts Silverstein, 53, documents in her new memoir, “My Glory Was I Had Such Friends” -- made sure she never spent a moment alone, even creating a spreadsheet calendar to organize their time in the hospital.“You feel blessed to show up, and it's a gift for us in a certain way, to be able to show up for her,” one of the nine friends, Jane Shepardson, told ABC News.The friends, some of whom were strangers to each other, said they thought it was a “very real possibility” they might lose Silverstein even as they spent time making her laugh and giving her spa treatments at the hospital.“It was hard to think about finding a way to strike a balance between saying goodbye and not saying goodbye,” said Shepardson.Silverstein, who now lives in New York City, was herself counting down the days until her suffering would end."I had a big number up on the wall," she said of the days she waited for a transplant to come through.The "Sick Girl" author underwent her first heart transplant at age 25 when she was in law school.“I was in law school and I found it hard to walk to class and went to the doctor, and they found out I was in heart failure,” Silverstein recalled. “The doctor said that after the transplant, if I got an organ, I would live maybe 10 years, at best.”Silverstein surpassed those expectations by living with her first donor heart for more than two decades. When she underwent her second transplant in 2014, Silverstein was able to walk down the hospital hallway just one day after surgery.Silverstein’s donor heart came from a 13-year-old girl.“I was told that this young girl, who I know nothing really about, but she was an athlete and she makes me want to run,” Silverstein said. “I can feel her as I run and she gave me new life, not just life but new life.”She added, “I never imagined that I would feel this well.”Silverstein’s group of friends, the same nine women who saw her at her weakest moment, said they notice the new life in their friend today too.“We were at a gathering about a year after this heart transplant and I looked over and saw Amy dancing with like so much color in her face,” recalled Shepardson. “And I just, it stopped me in my tracks and I started to cry.”She continued, "We never could have imagined that she would feel that good, look that good and be the healthiest she'd been in her entire life.”Silverstein's memoir about her friends' resilience and friendship has been acquired by J.J. Abrams' production company for a limited TV series, according to Deadline. "My Glory Was I Had Such Friends" is available now.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Rawpixel/iStock/Thinkstock(FOREST PARK, Ohio) -- Family is more than just blood, and the Sanders family is living proof.Christina and Christopher Sanders of Ohio received their first foster placement -- of four brothers -- in 2014, and it changed their lives forever. They took in the boys' two sisters in 2016. And now they have legally adopted all six siblings, which will ensure the brothers and sisters stay together."This whole experience has been so rewarding for us because taking care of the kids and caring for the kids through these past couple years, we got so close to them and developed such tremendous love for these children," Christopher Sanders told ABC News. "There's nothing we wouldn't do for these children. We just want the best for them. We felt like we had to do whatever we thought we could do to help.”"They’re definitely my children," he added.Chloe, 9, Carson, 10, Caylee, 12, Caleb, 13, Christian, 14, and Coby, 16, join the five biological children whom the Sanders already had and who have welcomed their new brothers and sisters. Christopher Sanders said the gang is getting along well despite their large number and "their sister and brother fights."“They’re just really happy,” Christina Sanders said.The family has started a GoFundMe account to raise funds to purchase a van to accommodate everyone, and then business will continue as usual, Christina Sanders said.“I’ll be getting a van and continuing to live and doing what we’ve been doing,” she said.Christopher Sanders said despite the rough patches that sometimes accompany foster parenting, he would encourage others to do it.“This whole transition has been so beautiful,” he said. “I can’t complain about anything. I would definitely recommend foster parenting to anyone.”Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...