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  • Digital Vision/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorThere’s no doubt about it, the Botox business is booming. Since 2011, the number of women receiving the cosmetic procedure has gone up more than 40 percent, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.  And some men are even getting into the action, a trend that’s been dubbed “brotox.” But a recently published book — called Botox Nation — says younger women are being aggressively targeted for treatments with hope that they'll become lifetime customers. Here’s my take on this issue: In a day and age where there are major issues facing our health, I don’t think we should be over obsessing about something like Botox when used for elective, cosmetic reasons. So if you’re considering Botox, go for it. Just go to a board certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — A woman who suffered from severe acrophobia conquered her fear of heights by facing her anxieties head-on as part of a new Good Morning America campaign that launched Friday called "Face Your Fears."Jane Fisher, 35, of Atlanta, climbed a 21-foot ladder live on GMA before anxiously stepping onto a trapeze platform to go flying high through the air.“I’m ready to fly,” Fisher proudly said moments before taking the leap at Fearless Flyers Academy in Mystic, Connecticut.And with that courageous attitude, she pulled it off.Psychologist Ellen Koch, a professor at Eastern Michigan University who specializes in "one-session exposure therapy,” has been helping Fisher train to get to this point.“For Jane, she was very motivated to overcome her fear and that was really helpful for her,” Koch said. “And it was really important for her to learn about the anxiety process and that it was important for her to confront her fear, and let the anxiety come down and that she’ll be fine with that, as opposed to trying to fight it or avoid it like she had done in the past.”Once Fisher climbed down from the net that caught her brave jump, she told GMA that she was “feeling awesome.”“I feel fearless,” she added. “Well, not fearless, but I just feel good.”She said the hardest part of the entire ordeal was getting from the ladder to the platform 21-feet in the air, “and just trying to reassure yourself there’s a net underneath, and then from there it helps the anxiety go down,” she explained.To help her build up to this experience, GMA sent Fisher to the Trapeze School New York to help her face her fears head-on by working with Koch."I freeze, I get sweaty palms," Fisher said at the time. "I'm getting sweaty palms thinking about it."Koch’s "one-session exposure therapy” is based on the premise that if you repeatedly flee from your anxieties, you actually reinforce that fear. But if you stay put and face the fear a little at a time, the anxiety will eventually subside."We'll have her take one step at a time," Koch said of Fisher at the start of her treatment. "We'll let her sort of pace treatment and so when she's ready, she'll take the next step up the ladder and we'll go one step at a time until she gets to the top."Koch added that she believes such therapy is so effective that Fisher’s lifelong fear of heights could be cured in three hours.And Friday on GMA, Fisher proved to herself that it worked.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WATERBORO, Maine) — Three good Samaritans rescued a teenage girl after she was thrown off a snowmobile into a frozen lake in Waterboro, Maine.The three rescuers — Brandon Jackson, Bill Rodgers and Taylor Dion — were fishing and snowmobiling near Little Ossipee Lake Feb. 4 when they saw someone struggling in the frozen water.Jackson, Rodgers and Dion threw a thick rope out to the victim in the water, who turned out to be a 16-year-old girl, and yelled instructions to her, saying, "Hold on tight. Get both hands. Kick your feet really hard.""All three of us pretty much decided, 'Hey let's get out there,'" Jackson said, adding he and the other rescuers were there at the "right place and the right time.""We were there and we helped and we had what we needed to get the job done and it worked out very well."Jackson, who captured the video on his helmet camera, Rodgers and Dion were able to pull the victim, who was not named, safely to shore.The teen's dramatic rescue demonstrates the dangers that can come with riding snowmobiles on ice.Snowmobiles can reach top speeds of over 90 mph and weigh over 600 pounds. Ice needs to be at least 5 inches thick in order to support the weight of the snowmobile, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.Individual drivers' own decisions, not the machines, may be responsible for a portion of the 14,000 reported injuries that occur on snowmobiles each year, according to the International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association."Snowmobile safety is the responsibility of all snowmobilers to conduct themselves in a safe manner and follow the snowmobiling laws and regulations," association president Ed Klim said in a statement to ABC News.Individuals who fall into frozen water, whether caused by a snowmobile accident or other things, should try to control their breathing, remain calm and focus on putting their arms on top of the ice and kicking their legs to pull themselves back onto the ice.The teen who was rescued in Maine also made a potentially lifesaving decision to remove her boots while in the water so they would not wear her down, according to police.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Handout via WLS(CHICAGO) — Three children have died from gun violence in Chicago this week, a city that has seen a record number of shootings and homicides in the last year.There were 762 homicides and 4,367 shootings in Chicago in 2016, police said. Of those shot, 76 where children younger than 15 years old, according to data from the Chicago Tribune.Since Jan. 1, 2017, shootings are up 8 percent in the city, and nine children younger than 15 years old have been shot, the Tribune reported.The recent killings have taken a toll on the community, and even the most hardened of law enforcement officers."When this violence touches the innocent or the young, that is when it is no longer just a part of your job," Chicago police superintendent Eddie Johnson said at a news conference on Wednesday. "It becomes personal."Johnson announced the arrest of a suspect in one of the three shootings. He said that Antwan Jones, 19, was charged with first-degree murder in the killing of 11-year-old Takiya Holmes, who was struck in the head by a stray bullet on Saturday while sitting in the back seat of a car. She died in a hospital on Tuesday.Just less than 30 minutes before Holmes was shot, a 12-year-old girl named Kanari Bowers was caught in a crossfire, according to authorities. Kanari had been playing basketball outside at an elementary school when a stray bullet struck her in the head. She died in the hospital on Wednesday.On Tuesday, a 2-year-old boy named Lavontay White was fatally shot in the head in a gang-related incident that was streamed in part on Facebook Live, according to police.The deaths this week are a window into the violence many young kids in Chicago face on a regular basis.For those who do survive — and for those who have to live with the pain of losing a friend or classmate, or witnessing a violent incident — the road to recovery and healing can be a long and difficult one, according to child trauma experts."We think that the incident is over after their bullet wounds recover, but really, this is just the beginning of their suffering," said clinical psychologist and Loyola University Chicago criminology professor Arthur Lurigio of children who survive gun violence."When the physical wound is repaired, there's still another wound -- one that can be lifelong," Lurigio told ABC News. "Once a child has been shot, their illusion of safety is completely and utterly shattered."That shaken sense of safety can lead to a wide array of symptoms, including many that are a part of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to Maryam Kia-Keating, an associate professor of clinical psychology at the University of California Santa Barbara."They may be struggling with distressing memories of what happened, such as having nightmares and flashbacks, and this can make it difficult to concentrate and pay attention," Kia-Keating told ABC News. "They can experience hyper-arousal, which is when you are more likely to have a startled response or be very frightened in situations where you are not necessarily facing the same threat, but you feel like that same threat is there."Other symptoms include trouble eating and sleeping and experiencing aches and pains that aren't related to an acute illness, Kia-Keating said.Both Kia-Keating and Lurigio emphasized that trauma almost always extends beyond the child who has survived being shot."It's important to view trauma as happening to an entire community," Lurigio said. "Classmates and friends of a child who was shot can also feel traumatized ... so it's also important that schools have the necessary resources to help kids cope with these kinds of tragic incidents."Moreover, adults who are parents of a child who survived a shooting can also be affected."It's important for parents, teachers and caregivers to know that if they're not taking care of themselves first, they will be compromised in their ability to take care of children," Kia-Keating said. "These incidents can be just as frighten
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  • Wavebreakmedia/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The American College of Physicians has updated their current guidelines on treating low back pain — and there are some surprises.Published in Annals of Internal Medicine, the ACP's primary recommendation is to avoid using any drug-based treatment as a first option, and instead opt for non-drug approaches: exercise, rehab, acupuncture, mindfulness meditation, tai chi, yoga, biofeedback, spinal manipulation and cognitive behavioral therapy.The authors of these guidelines looked to a systematic review, conducted by the ACP, that looked at those treatments and over-the-counter and prescription painkillers. The authors examined how well all helped with short-term and long-term pain relief, function, and improvement in mood, as well as whether these patients would eventually need surgery.They found acetaminophen and steroids were each ineffective for low back pain, NSAIDs had smaller benefit than a placebo for chronic low back pain, duloxetine was more effective than placebo and TCAs were only as effective as placebo.The authors also said that patients who don’t have an effective response to non-pharmacological therapy can then be told to use NSAIDs as first line therapy, with tramadol or duloxetine as second-line therapy.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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