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  • iStock/Thinkstock(KNOXVILLE, Tenn.) — Two high school sweethearts finally got their chance to say “I do,” but their wedding didn’t happen the way they expected.Ronda Mager was diagnosed with epithelioid sarcoma, a rare form of cancer, one year ago. Doctors recently told her she only had days to live.“I ask God every day, why,” her husband Matthew Mager said to ABC affiliate WATE-TV.Ronda and Matthew, who live in Knoxville, Tennessee, have been together for 10 years and have two children. A big wedding was always something the couple dreamed of, but it wasn’t financially possible.“I brought her home and I fulfilled what I promised to her, that we’re getting married,” Matthew told WATE.The family continues to pray for a miracle but are grateful for the time they have left with Ronda. “If it’s a week or a year or the rest of her life, I’m thankful for that time,” Matthew said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(RICHMOND, Va.) — A couple who tried nearly two decades to conceive has welcomed a set of sextuplets in Richmond, Virginia.Adeboye and Ajibola Taiwo tried for 17 years to have children. In January, they learned they were expecting six.“I was excited,” said dad Adeboye Taiwo. “For the very first time we were expecting.”The babies, three boys and three girls, range in weight from 1 pound, 10 ounces, to 2 pounds, 15 ounces, according to VCU Medical Center in Richmond, Virginia.“We’re going through this extraordinary journey together with the family,” Ronald Ramus, M.D., director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at VCU Medical Center, said in the hospital's press release. “It’s not every day that parents bring home sextuplets. Mrs. Taiwo was eating, sleeping and breathing for seven. A lot of the support and encouragement we gave her to make it as far as she did was important, and one of the biggest contributions we made as a team.”In 2015, there were close to 4 million live births in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Only 24 of those births were quintuplets or other higher-order births.“I hope for the smallest of my six children to grow up and say, ‘I was so small, and look at me now,’” said Ajibola Taiwo. “I want my kids [to] come back to VCU to study and learn to care for others with the same people who cared for me and my family.”Ajibola Taiwo was discharged from the hospital May 18, but the sextuplets remain in the neonatal intensive care unit at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU. All six babies are "doing well and continue to thrive" in the NICU, according to VCU.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Sunday night is the worst night of the week for sleeping, according to a recent survey of nearly 4,280 Americas published by the app Calm.com. Since your presumably lousy Mondays are presumably caused by being tired, this is important. And you're not alone: nearly half of those surveyed say they have the worst trouble sleeping Sunday compared to other days of the week."Many people go to bed later on Friday and Saturday nights and then sleep in later on Saturday and Sunday mornings," says Steve Orma, clinical psychologist and insomnia specialist. "So, when they go to bed on Sunday night, they’re often just not tired. And then when they can’t sleep, they start to think about why they’re not sleeping, which only makes things worse."While sleep deprivation has been linked to all manner of health issues, from obesity to heart disease, take comfort in one thing as you drift off tonight: Thursdays are the best nights for sleep, the survey reveals. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Hemera/Thinkstock(VANCOUVER, British Columbia) — A girl who was pulled into a Canada harbor by a sea lion is receiving medical treatment over concerns her broken skin could have been infected by a dangerous bacteria from the animal's mouth, according to officials at the Vancouver aquarium.A video that has gone viral showed the young girl pulled into the water after a sea lion grabbed her white dress. The girl, along with a man who jumped into help her, were quickly pulled to safety. But marine life experts warned they could have been exposed to a rare infection sometimes called "seal finger" from the encounter.The family contacted the Vancouver Aquarium for help, after one of the facility's mammal trainers spoke about the condition during several interviews over the weekend, according to aquarium spokeswoman Deana Lancaster"The family saw the media reports and got in touch with us. She did get a superficial wound and she’s going to get the right treatment," Lancaster told ABC News.Seal finger infections are caused by different kinds of Mycoplasma bacteria, which live naturally in the mouths of sea mammals like seals and sea lions, according to a 2009 published case report. Exposure via a cut in the skin can often result in cellulitis or a soft-tissue infection and untreated infections that become severe can lead to loss of fingers or limbs."If any member of our animal care team receives a bite from a sea or sea lion, they take a letter from our vet with them to the hospital, which explains that the infection is resistant to some antibiotics," Lancaster told ABC News, explaining the condition can be "painful and potentially debilitating."The infection which has also been called "spekk-finger," which means blubber-finger in Norwegian, can be tricky to treat. Mycoplasma bacteria are the smallest form of bacteria and do not have a cell wall, which is the primary target for many antibiotics like penicillin.Other types of antibiotics, including tetracycline, can be used to treat the infection if it is diagnosed properly. Prior to antibiotic treatment, many seal hunters would risk losing fingers or hands to the disease. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Melissa Nathan Cutchin(WASHINGTON) — The opioid epidemic that has hit communities across the country with overdoses and crime is having another, less visible but significant impact: overloading the foster care system with children taken from the homes of suspected drug users.A rising number of children are being removed from homes across the country where caretakers have been accused of using opiates, according to the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), taxing foster care systems that are ill-equipped to take in so many children in such a short period of time.In a policy brief from July 2016 titled "Families in Crisis," the HRSA stated that the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Health Services “is concerned that the opioid crisis could exacerbate child abuse and neglect given that we’re seeing a link nationally. State child welfare systems have reported that they are experiencing an increase in families coming to their attention with substance use problems impacting their ability to safely parent.”One Florida community has been hit particularly hard by this phenomenon.Kathryn Shea, a licensed clinical social worker and president of the Florida Center for Early Childhood, told ABC News the problem is especially acute in Florida’s Judicial Circuit 12, which includes Sarasota, Manatee and DeSoto counties.“The little ones in foster care are coming in enormous rates right now because of their parents’ heroin addictions,” she said.In July 2015, this circuit administered a record 281 doses of Narcan (naloxone), an opiate antidote that blocks the effects of opioids and reverses an overdose, a number confirmed by the Florida Department of Children and Families. But then came July 2016, when the number of doses more than doubled to 749.Changes in the law in 2012 on opioid prescriptions and the creation of the prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) shut down clinics and forced many addicts to the streets to find their next high, creating a demand for drugs like heroin and the increasingly popular fentanyl, according to Capt. Todd Michael Shear of the Special Investigations Division at the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office.“Synthetic opioids have now driven the cost of heroin down,” Shear said. “A hit of heroin typically goes for approximately $15 on the streets. An opioid pill goes for $30 plus.”Simultaneously, Circuit 12 has also seen an increase in the number of children removed from their homes and placed in foster care."For Circuit 12, we have had the highest child removal rate over the last three years," Brena Slater, vice president of the Safe Children’s Coalition, told ABC News. "The main issue has been due to the substance abuse ... it started out a couple of years ago as pills and we've seen an enormous progression into heroin."Florida foster homes are only licensed to house five children at a time, a cap that is often exceeded in Florida’s Circuit 12, according to Shea, the licensed clinical social worker.Connie Keehner, child protective investigation supervisor for the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office, said, “Our foster care homes are so saturated, we just don’t have enough left.”There are only 159 foster homes registered in Circuit 12, Slater, of the Safe Children Coalition, said. But between 2013 and 2014, the Florida Department of Children and Families removed 395 children from their homes in the area.The state removed 880 the next month, more than double.After children have been removed from their homes, parents have about 12 months to work a case plan; the national standard is that 75.2 percent of children should be reunified with their parents within the year.While recovery and reunification are the ultimate goal, the risk of relapse is a very real possibility, Shea told ABC News.The shortage of foster parents and homes in the area stems from a variety of reasons, Shea ex
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