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  • Courtesy Canyon Ranch(NEW YORK) -- If two of your New Year's resolutions are to get fit and travel more, taking a wellness vacation might be the best way to get a jump-start on keeping true to your word.We've rounded up a few of the best places to drop a few pounds and get a little R&R in the process.Canyon RanchA staple in wellness travel, Canyon Ranch has resorts in Tucson, Arizona, and Lenox, Massachusetts. Programs geared for moms and fitness buffs are offered.For those looking to jump-start a healthier lifestyle, the 7 Days to Change program in Tucson is a good option. It includes daily fitness and addresses nutrition and stress. Other week-long programs include: Weight Loss Program, Focus on Mindfulness, Renew Your Spirit Week, Focus on Brain Health, Encore: Flourishing in the Second Half of Life and Women’s Health and Wellness Summit. A day might include a water workout, hiking, pilates, seminars and more.Canyon Ranch is all inclusive, rates start at $1,000 per person, per night.BodyHolidayThis all-inclusive resort on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia is dedicated to well-being and allows guests to design their own getaway. Yoga, spin, pilates, Zumba and beach volleyball are available.New this year, however, is the addition of the Villa Firefly and customized-themed getaways. The four-bedroom villa can accommodate up to 10 guests. Retreats are Cleanse & Detox, Yoga, Mindfulness, Weight Loss and Verdic, which is "designed to restore guests who are mentally, emotionally, or physically drained by a demanding work or home life. The retreat uses a 360 degree approach, which aims to rejuvenate and re-balance mind, body, and soul." Dates for retreats vary by theme; check with the resort for details.Prices are from $550 per person, per night.Biggest Loser ResortsYou've heard of the show and some of the amazing transformations that have taken place. If you're hoping for a major weight loss of your own, check out one of the three Biggest Loser Resort locations in Amelia Island, Florida, Niagara, New York, or Palm Desert, California.A typical day at the resort starts with an early yoga class and includes several other activities -- like spin and circuit training -- in the afternoon and evening. There are classes on emotional versus intuitive eating, interactive cooking demonstrations and three calorie conscious meals each day. Prices vary depending on length of stay and room type, but a stay generally runs about $2,000 per person, per week.The RanchWith 4, 7 and 10-day options and locations in both Malibu and Westlake Village, California, The Ranch has an option that fits your scheduling needs. Each day starts with an hours-long hike and several hours of low-impact strength training. Plan on yoga, cooking classes and massages during your stay.Prices vary, the popular 7-day program is priced at $7,800.The Fitness CruiseUnlike our other recommendations, you'll only have one shot at The Fitness Cruise in 2018. The 7-day cruise departs on Oct. 28 from Miami and goes to various ports in the Eastern Caribbean. Guests onboard the Norwegian Getaway can take cardio classes, dance classes, yoga, cooking seminars and more.The Fitness Cruise is priced from $1,066 per person for an inside cabin.
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  • Maria Esperanza Flores Rios(LOS ANGELES) -- A set of twins in Southern California were born in two different years.Although they were born just 18 minutes apart, Joaquin Ontiveros was born a year earlier than his sister, Aitana de Jesus, at the Delano Regional Medical Center in California's Kern County, their mother, Earlimart resident Maria Esperanza Flores Rios told ABC News on Tuesday.The baby boy was born at 11:58 p.m. on Dec. 31, 2017, and weighed in at 5 pounds, 9 ounces and was 18 inches long, ABC station KABC reported. His younger sister was born at 12:16 a.m. on Jan. 1, 2018, at 4 pounds, 10 ounces and 16 inches long.Rios gave birth to the twins via C-section nearly 4 weeks early, she said. Her original due date was scheduled for Jan. 27.The hospital wrote on Facebook that it was "honored to play a significant role in this 2018 New Year delivery of baby twins" and thanked the "dedicated" hospital staff.Rios' sister, 25-year-old Aurelia Perez Rios, told ABC News that she is happy for her sister and brother-in-law."I'm excited and thrilled to be an aunt once again," Aurelia Perez Rios said.Rios is now a mother of five.
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  • Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Dry January, giving up alcohol for the entire month of January, has become a common New Year’s resolution and Dr. Jennifer Ashton of ABC News’ "Good Morning America" is taking on the alcohol-free challenge this month.“It’s just a little experiment I am doing, kicking off 2018,” Ashton, ABC News' chief medical correspondent, said. “There’s a saying in medicine: Doctor heal thyself. I give this advice to women every single day, but we’ll see if I can take my advice."Ashton spoke to "GMA" about her reasons for doing Dry January and her comments are lightly edited and transcribed below. Send us your comments and advice with #DryJENuary on Twitter.I have decided to try Dry January and I’m inviting you guys to try it with me. Why did I decide to do it? Good question. I think more curiosity from a medical and wellness standpoint and also psychologically.My baseline alcohol consumption I think meets criteria for “moderate," which as you guys know because I have defined it many times on the air, is seven 5-ounce servings of wine per week, or seven alcoholic servings a week.Now, my drink of choice is clear tequila, which I usually drink on the rocks with a slice of orange. I think it’s a pretty clean drink in terms of, it doesn’t have a lot of excess sugar, I don’t throw margarita mix in there.I would say in a normal week I probably drink once during the week if I go out to dinner, which I normally do Monday through Friday once. And then on the weekends, when I’m at hockey games, or I am out with friends Friday, Saturday or Sunday. So let’s say it is four nights a week.My motto is two and through. I never have more than two drinks, but four times two, I am over that moderate consumption threshold. Not that it was to the excessive amount, but I kind of had a gut feeling that I was teetering around or over that moderate definition. So I decided a couple of weeks ago that I was going to do a dry month. For the record, the last time I did a “dry” anything, I was pregnant with my second child, who is now 18 years old, so it’s been a while.From a medical standpoint, these are the things I’m curious about:I’m curious if my skin looks better.I’m curious to see if I lose even a pound, which is not my goal, but I’m just curious to see how literally the math kind of falls out.I’m curious behaviorally how it’s going to feel especially in social settings. I feel like I would totally be OK if I kind of went into a cave, didn’t go out with friends, but once I am out…. When you sit down at that table and the waiter or waitress comes around, it’s like automatic, you start looking at the drink menu, everyone else starts ordering and that peer pressure can be really, really powerful.I would love for some people to "suffer" along with me, so I have been trying to recruit some friends. So far I have one who is going to do it with me. You know what they say, misery loves company.I am going to keep track of how it goes, how I feel. And I figure if I did it twice during two pregnancies, I should be able to do it again. (Although granted then, I had kind of a loftier motivation for doing it!)But I think it speaks to this issue that is much more in the scientific and medical spotlight right now, which is women and alcohol consumption, and can it be too much?I speak to my patients every single day about ways to reduce their risk for breast cancer. The easiest thing they could do would be to not drink alcohol or to greatly diminish the amount of alcohol that they consume. And very few women are willing to do that, are interested in doing that or have done it.So it’s just a little experiment I am doing, kicking off 2018. I would love to hear your thoughts on it. I would love for you to try it with me and we’ll see how it goes.There’s a saying in medi
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two days into the new year and hopefully your New Year’s resolution is still on track.While most people can make it through the first days, maybe even weeks of January, it is those days and weeks throughout the rest of 2018 that sometimes catch up with even the best of intentions.So how do you make your New Year's resolution stick? Experts say it is important to remember it is a journey, not an overnight fix, especially when it comes to the most common of resolutions, weight loss and exercise."The reason why people make resolutions every year is because it’s really hard," said Maya Feller, a New York-based dietitian. "You first started eating when you were 6 months old, so that’s many years of learned food behavior.""Change is not going to happen overnight," she said.Feller and other experts shared their top tips for making sure your health and wellness resolutions become true lifestyle changes.Solidify your intentionEven just a few days into January is the right time to remind yourself why you chose your resolution, according to Feller."Sometimes after just a few days of changing your diet you feel good and feel like you can let it go," she said. "In the early part of January, reevaluate your motivation and say, 'Why am I doing this again? I'm making this intentional choice again.'"Rebecca Scritchfield, a Washington, D.C.-based dietitian and certified exercise physiologist, said it's also important to remember your "why" multiple times daily."What’s going to help keep you motivated is continuing to think about the benefits you’re receiving, in both the short term and the long term," she said. "The more you focus on the benefits every time you do it, you’ll see the good earlier."She added, "What you want to say is, 'There’s too much good in this for me to stop.'"'Layer' the changesFeller advises her clients to pick the "low-hanging fruit" when they make a plan for their resolutions."If you’re eating two vegetables a day, make it four," she said. "Once you’ve hit that, reevaluate again and ask yourself, 'Why am I doing this and what do I have to add on?'"Feller compares improving eating habits to building a house. You start by making sure you have a solid foundation and build up from there."You have to put the foundation down and solidify the behavior," she said. "It is behavior change. That’s the thing about nutrition."Say no to the quick fixBoth Feller and Scritchfield stress that going for the quick solution, like a plan promising you'll lose 15 pounds in January, will not be sustainable and may even leave you worse off."You might lose 15 [pounds] but you’re not going to continue it with that approach," she said. "It's better to have the small success so you can continue to step forward."Scritchfield said taking the more moderate, long-lasting approach to healthy eating and exercise demands that you let go of the shame or fear that comes from overindulging in the holiday season."You're going to be so tempted in the new year to fall for an extreme plan because you’re feeling like you want to make a change and you’re also being told there is something wrong with where you are right now," she said. "The more important value is feeling like you have a good life and feeling happy with your habits.""Go down the road of, 'It’s OK to be where I am and what’s the next goal that I think is interesting to me and will also help me create a better life,'" she said. "Walk down that road of kindness as opposed to something that is short term."Live your valuesRecognizing that the changes you are making are part of the person you want to be can help you sustain your resolutions over the long term, according to Scritchfield."A simple way of remembering your values is saying, for example, ‘I want to be the kind of person who enjoys healthy eating. I feel good when I eat at home and I’m saving money and that&rsquo
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