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  • ABC News(PHOENIX) -- An Arizona woman unexpectedly gave birth Wednesday while en route to the hospital.At 1:23 a.m. on November 8, Shannon Geise, 31, delivered her own son after pulling over her family SUV near 32nd Street and Union Hills in Phoenix.Baby Sebastian arrived weighing 6 pounds, 7 ounces."I could have never guessed that I was going to give birth in the car," Geise told ABC News. "Everybody's pretty surprised obviously, a little bit in shock just like me. [We're] happy he's here and that everyone's healthy and there's no complications. He's a great baby."Geise is also mom to Devon, 11, Dominik, 9, Damen, 5 and Olivia, 1.Geise said her water broke around midnight. She grabbed Olivia and headed to Abrazo Scottsdale Campus, formerly known as Paradise Valley Hospital. That night, Geise's three boys were with their father, Geise's former husband. Sebastian's father was at his own home at the time, Geise said."I got in the car and my biggest fear at that time was that I wasn't going to make it in time to get an epidural," Geise recalled. "As I started driving, it just became extremely intense and the hospital is only 15 to 20 minutes from my house. I got almost all the way there and I had a contraction that would not stop ... that's when I felt [the baby] actually move down."Geise pulled her vehicle over and dialed 911. The recording was released by the Phoenix Fire Department to ABC News."What's wrong?" the dispatcher asked."I just delivered a baby in my car," Geise replied.The dispatcher offered to send an ambulance, but Geise was already less than five minutes down the road."She called 911 where she was offered an ambulance and a firetruck with paramedics to assist her in safely getting to the hospital after delivering her child," the fire department wrote in a statement to ABC News. "The caller stated she was already on her way to the hospital and was approximately a half a mile away."The department went on, "The alarm room then called the hospital to make them aware that a woman who had just given birth was roughly 3 minutes away from their hospital. Mom and baby are both doing great."Geise drove herself the rest of the way to the hospital where she, her newborn son and 1-year-old daughter were greeted by emergency staff."The physicians, nurses and other caregivers in the Abrazo Scottsdale Campus emergency department are trained to handle uncommon emergent situations like this," the hospital wrote in a statement to ABC News. "We are proud of the care we gave Shannon and her baby when they arrived at our hospital, and we wish them both a happy and healthy future."Geise said she and baby Sebastian are doing well.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Support Dogs Inc.(NEW YORK) -- This 6-month-old kitten holds his own among 23 support dogs.DOG the cat, pronounced dee-OH-gee, isn’t just named after canines, he also thinks he is one.The friendly feline lives at Support Dogs, Inc., in St. Louis, Missouri, and helps train the pups.“He rules the roost. He is the boss,” owner Anne Klein told ABC News.Klein said DOG has become a “training tool” for the assistance dogs as they through their two-year training process to be placed, free of charge, with people who have mobility issues, are deaf or hard of hearing. The dogs are also used in courtrooms during difficult situations for children.“In our training, our dogs have to be so well-behaved and not be reactive in many situations, so when a cat goes scampering in front of them and they’re in a down-stay, the command, they don’t go running after him,” said Klein. “They have to be well-behaved and not get distracted. He’ll go scampering by and they have to be good, obedient.”DOG certainly gives them a run for their money. Klein said he loves to pull at the pup’s tails and bat at their noses.But mostly, “he’ll just snuggle up with them on their dog beds,” she said.The kitten has a 5-foot-tall kitty condo in the middle of the office where he lives. Klein said when her staff returns in the morning, you can tell right away how rambunctious DOG has been overnight.“Oftentimes when we come in the morning, he’s taken push pins off our bulletin boards and rearranged our papers,” she said with a laugh. “We’re not sure what he’s doing at night but he’s rearranging things to his liking.”Despite his pesky behavior, “He’s certainly won the hearts of lots of dog lovers,” Klein said of everyone in their office.“He’s definitely earned his keep, even though he’s cat,” she added.
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  • Obtained by ABC News(NEW YORK) -- After a 2011 semi-truck accident crushed his hip and legs, Buddy Rich's weight increased to over 300 pounds and he fell into a suicidal depression.“The one thing that stopped me was my daughter,” the Florida military veteran said of his thoughts of suicide. His daughter was born just three weeks before the accident.Rich had served in U.S. Army as a specialist in an engineering detachment from 2003 to 2008 and in the Army Reserves from 2008 to 2011. Afterward, he returned to school and worked for a delivery company. One of his closest friends in the military had committed suicide after they had both retired from service.Rich was inspired to try yoga to cut his weight and strengthen his muscles after he stumbled across a viral video of another disabled vet named Arthur Boorman who lost weight following a yoga plan by former pro wrestler Diamond Dallas Page.In the years that followed, Rich reduced his weight by 125 pounds and regained much of his mobility.Just a few weeks ago, he taught his daughter how to ride a bike while running alongside her.“I never thought I was going to get to wrestle with my kids, pick them up, anything. [Now] I can be a dad again,” said Rich.He was surprised when Diamond Dallas Page showed up on the doorstep of his Apollo Beach, Florida, home to congratulate him on his successful training and to do a backyard workout with Rich.“I can’t believe the dude who like changed my life is in front of me,” said Rich, “It’s unbelievable.”
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  • ABC News(LONDON) -- A London woman is using her maternity leave for her second child to travel the world with her family.Karen Edwards, 33, is traveling through the U.S., Central America and South America with her husband, Shaun Bayes; their daughter, Esmé, 3; and 4-month-old son, Quinn. Edwards also took maternity leave after her daughter's birth in 2014 to travel the world.The family left London on their monthslong adventure when Quinn was just 9 weeks old.“It’s actually easier than being at home because at home you've got so much more things to do in just running a household,” Edwards told ABC News. “We’re really happy with what we're doing.”The family visited Spain and Canada and drove down the West Coast of the U.S. before visiting Belize, Guatemala and El Salvador.They’ve stayed in beach cabanas, camper vans, hotels and with local families along the way.“I do believe that it's definitely character-building,” Edwards said, adding that Quinn “doesn't blink an eyelid” to being in a new bedroom almost nightly.Quinn has already visited seven countries in his four months of life, while Esmé has visited nearly 30 countries at age 3.Edwards and Bayes decided, after Edwards unexpectedly became pregnant with Esmé, they would keep traveling as they’d loved to do as a couple.When Esmé was 10 weeks old, the family left London for Bayes’ native New Zealand and then traveled throughout Southeast Asia.Edwards, a nurse manager at a London hospital, receives full or partial payment through nine months of maternity leave. The last three months of her leave are unpaid, but the family rents out their house in London to help cover expenses.Bayes works in construction and has flexibility with his work schedule.Edwards said the great experience spending a year traveling with Esmé inspired her and Bayes to do the same with Quinn.“The most enjoyable bit was just having unlimited time for Esmé and seeing her developing without having many distractions,” she said. “We didn't have a house to maintain and we didn't have errands to run, so it was just her and us two parents being parents.”Edwards and Bayes started a blog where they document their travels with their kids."Most of the [reaction] is positive and heartwarming, that we've inspired them to do something similar," Edwards said.The family has faced criticisms for exposing their kids to foreign countries at such a young age. Edwards reminds critics that she is a nurse and they take “all necessary precautions.”“This is the thing: we were already really into traveling,” Edwards said. “If it's something that you really enjoy anyway, you want to pass that onto your kid in some way.”
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