• Scott Clarke / ESPN Images(LOS ANGELES) -- Even 23-time Grand Slam singles champion Serena Williams was at a loss over how to help her baby, Alexis, through teething pain.Admitting she was "stressed," the new mom reached out to fellow mommies on social media Sunday."Teething- aka the devil - is so hard. Poor Alexis Olympia has been so uncomfortable," the tennis star wrote alongside a photo of her daughter. "She cried so much (she never cries) I had to hold her until she fell asleep. I've tried amber beads... cold towels.... chew on mommies fingers.... homeopathic water (lol on that one) but nothing is working. It's breaking my heart. I almost need my mom to come and hold me to sleep cause I'm so stressed. Help? Anyone??"Responses from fans ranged from rubbing whiskey on the gums to using baby Orajel to letting the baby gnaw on a Milk-Bone biscuit for dogs.Williams, 37, and husband Alexis Ohanian, the co-founder of Reddit, welcomed their first child in September. Together since 2015, they wed in a star-studded ceremony in New Orleans last month.Sunday was not the first time that Williams has reached out to other moms for parenting advice.Earlier this month she tweeted, "Fellow moms: How long did you breastfeed? Is it weird that I get emotional when I even just think about when it’s time to stop?"One of the responses came from Broadway star Audra McDonald. "I nursed my older daughter until she was almost 2. Still going with my 1 year old right now," she tweeted. "You’ll know when it’s time to stop. Enjoy! She is beautiful!"Though she may be enjoying motherhood, Williams is already training to return to the court. She is registered for the January competition to defend her title, according to the organizers of the Australian Open.She beat sister Venus Williams last year while pregnant.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Taylor Bell Duck grew up shifting, making cuts, and changing directions on the soccer field.A star athlete in high school, Duck was taking the next step on her athletic journey as she was on her way to play Division 1 soccer at East Carolina University. Once she went to college, however, her life shifted in a different direction. Health became an issue for Duck. She experienced numbness in her feet and recurring pneumonia, which forced her to quit soccer before graduating. She later had surgery on a collapsed lung and medical experts determined she had lung cancer.Cancer-free nine years later, Duck is now balancing life as a mom, wife, and full-time graduate student, all while holding a full-time job. She has also partnered with the pharmaceutical company Merck on a new initiative called Your Cancer Game Plan to help spread awareness about lung cancer. She recently spoke with ABC News about her experience and involvement with her new initiativeDuck admits she hardly understood lung cancer when she was first diagnosed, saying, "I thought that only smokers and older people got this disease, but what I've learned since through my diagnosis this disease is touching more and more people, and particularly never-smoking individuals."She calls lung cancer is a "highly stigmatized" disease because it can affect any person, even a young, non-smoking individual like herself. She says that stigma also affects people who may have smoked for a portion of their lives. They may feel guilty about approaching a medical professional so to avoid being chastised for their life choices.Through Your Cancer Game Plan, she outlines three pillars people can follow to help them through their lung cancer battle and work to end the stigma associated with the disease.Duck discusses are healthy eating, emotional well-being, and open communication in a set of short videos on the website.Duck told ABC News her sister was a source of emotional support during her cancer battle, and she learned it was important to be open and communicative with her doctor to push to find the underlying causes to her recurring symptoms.She also encourages those who may feel guilty about approaching a doctor to reach out because they will try to provide the necessary care to combat a disease before it could get worse.Your Cancer Game Plan initially launched with a focus on head and neck cancer and melanoma. Now, it offers resources to anyone who is affected by lung cancer.Duck shares his own story and talks further about the strategies that helped her beat cancer on www.yourcancergameplan.com.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The #MeToo movement that has encouraged women to speak out about their experiences of sexual harassment or assault, contributing to a recent wave of prominent American men facing accusations of sexual misconduct, has also sparked another conversation -- on parenting.A key question coming to the fore is how best to raise boys so that they grow up to be kind men who treat women as equals and with respect.Matt Damon opens up about Harvey Weinstein, sexual harassment and confidentiality agreementsThe 'silence breakers' of #MeToo movement named Time magazine's 2017 person of the year“Good Morning America” is taking an in-depth look at that conversation by speaking with boys, parents and experts about raising good men.“GMA” correspondent T.J. Holmes went straight to the source, speaking with six boys, ages 7 to 10, in the Houston area.Some of the boys said when told to “man up” you are being told to be “tough” and “strong.”That raised a red flag for one expert, Dr. David Anderson, a child psychologist at New York’s Child Mind Institute.“They've gotten some of those social messages about being rough and tough and, you know, that girls are frail and those kinds of things,” said Anderson, who watched the interview with the boys from another room with their parents.“The boys grow older, and we want to give them a much more diverse idea of what it means to be a good person, that it's important to be kind for everybody, that it's important to protect everyone,” Anderson said.One mom praised her husband for helping to teach their 7-year-old son about respect by reminding him to open doors for his mom and sister.Anderson said such parenting, modeling and encouragement of good behavior is important whether it comes from a male or female parent."It's catching the boys doing the things that you want to make sure they do more of," he said. "And that takes being there and having those conversations, saying, 'I was really proud of how you acted in that moment.'"Anderson told the parents of the six boys that they, like any generation of parents, have new topics they have to address with their sons based on the “news of the day,” in this case, sexual harassment.Anderson advised the parents that their sons may not fully understand the topic but, with open conversation, this generation of kids can move society forward.“I think it's about having conversations that are open like this one, to look at what those values are, how they dovetail with the values that you have at home,” he said. “And then making sure that you pick and choose the ones that are both being the kind of man that you'd like them to grow into and also the ones that are consistent with your family.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Trump administration officials in the Department of Health and Human Services said a report that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading U.S. public health agency, is being barred from using certain words, including "diversity," "transgender" and "fetus," is a “complete mischaracterization.”The Washington Post reported that policy analysts at the CDC were told in a meeting Thursday to not use certain words in any official documents for preparing for the budget for fiscal year 2019.The words are: "evidence-based," "science-based," "entitlement," "vulnerable," "diversity," "transgender," and "fetus," the Post reported.In response to ABC News' request for comment from the CDC, an HHS spokesperson responded in a statement."The assertion that HHS has 'banned words' is a complete mischaracterization of discussions regarding the budget formulation process," the HHS statement said. "HHS will continue to use the best scientific evidence available to improve the health of all Americans. HHS also strongly encourages the use of outcome and evidence data in program evaluations and budget decisions.”ABC News asked HHS for further clarification but has not yet received a response.The Post reported that, according to a source, policy analysts were given some phrases to use instead of the prohibited words, such as instead of saying “science-based” or “evidence-based” using the phrase, “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes.”Some of the CDC's work deals explicitly with issues described by the reportedly banned words. The health agency's web page with information on the Zika virus for pregnant women notes, for example, that "Zika virus can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus."And the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention refers on its website to the importance of its mission of "addressing the health needs of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender."
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  • @NickRowley(BOISE, Idaho) -- One snowboard-loving family was determined to get their daughter up on the slopes by her 1st birthday.Nick and Whitney Rowley pulled it off, having their daughter, Cash, successfully snowboard on a bunny slope at Bogus Basin in Boise, Idaho last Saturday.The Boise, Idaho couple, who've been married for nearly three years, are sports enthusiasts.Not to mention, Whitney Rowley is the granddaughter of Wesley Deist, a well known ski coach in Idaho, having coached for 52 years before he passed away in 2008, according to his obituary."We are a big snowboard family," Nick Rowley, 32, told ABC News. "We just wanted to get her on a board as soon as possible and get her used to it."The Rowley's first purchased a snowboard for their daughter when she was only a "couple weeks" old, Nick Rowley said."We set it out as a goal to get her out on the snow -- if she was walking by her first birthday," he added. "She started walking when she was 9 months ... so we got really excited and that’s when we started practicing in the house on the carpet."The parents spent time getting their daughter used to being strapped into a snowboard. They then used a retractable cord to drag the snowboard in their house, on the carpet, to simulate what it'd be like on the slopes.Last Saturday, Cash Rowley officially hit the slopes after the parents got an OK from their pediatrician that it'd be safe.Whitney Rowley, also 32, said watching her daughter go down the bunny slopes for the first time was "pretty crazy.""Most moms are really scared, and I was too, but I started skiing when I was 2," the proud mother continued. "It’s always been a big deal for us."It was an especially sentimental moment for Whitney Rowley, who said it reminded her of her grandfather."Having her on the board, it made me tear up because I was super proud," she added. "My grandpa -- one of the first ski instructors in the state of Idaho -- it just made me think of him."Cash Rowley's mother added that her daughter "had a good time" on the bunny slopes. She continued, "Cash was making noices, yelling, hooting and hollering."The couple is now planning a trip to Costa Rica in February. They hope to get their daughter up on a surfboard for the first time then.
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  • Photodisc/Thinkstock(FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.) -- About 220 passengers aboard a five-night Caribbean cruise, slated to return to Ft. Lauderdale Saturday morning, suffered from a gastrointestinal illness over the past week, Royal Caribbean announced."Independence of the Seas is currently on a five-night Caribbean cruise, which departed Port Everglades, Florida, on Dec. 11," Royal Caribbean said in a statement Friday to ABC News. "Over the week, 220 cases of gastrointestinal illness were reported -- representing 4.86 percent of the 5,547 guests and crew onboard."The Miami-based cruise line continued in its statement, "Those affected by the short-lived illness were treated by our ship’s doctors with over-the-counter medication, and we hope all our guests feel better quickly. Meanwhile, we’re taking steps like intensive sanitary procedures to minimize the risk of any further issues. The ship will also undergo special additional cleaning procedures before it departs on its next cruise."According to ABC Miami affiliate WPLG-TV, Royal Caribbean encourages passengers and crew to wash their hands often, which health experts have said is the best defense against stomach viruses.This incident echoes a similar one that occurred earlier this month aboard Royal Caribbean's Ovation of the Sea.More than 200 people became sick, and five were hospitalized in Australia after an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness.A Royal Caribbean spokeswoman said of that outbreak, "Those affected by the short-lived illness were treated by our ship's doctors with over-the-counter medication."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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