• iStock/Thinkstock(HERVEY BAY, Australia) -- A seriously ill Australian woman's wish to see the ocean came true when the ambulance transporting her to the hospital took a detour to allow her to look out upon the water at least one more time.The moment was captured in a photograph and shared on Facebook by the Queensland Ambulance Service. The picture shows a paramedic standing next to a stretcher parked under a tree, facing the ocean.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MICHIGAN CITY, Ind.) -- A routine traffic stop turned into the opportunity to save a life for an Indiana sheriff's deputy Tuesday morning.La Porte County Deputy Austin Wells pulled a driver over near Michigan City Tuesday morning for speeding when he realized the woman was choking, ABC station WLS reported."I was kind of in shock, to be honest with you. I have made hundreds of traffic stops," Wells told reporters during a press conference Wednesday, WLS reported.Police officer enlists surfers' help in dramatic rescue of swimmers caught in rip currentMom's Rescue of Choking Toddler Daughter Caught on VideoWells said he was traveling southbound when he clocked a vehicle traveling in the other direction at 70 miles per hour in a 45 mile-per-hour zone.After pulling over the woman for speeding, Wells said he noticed she was struggling to breathe."The driver had a very deep reddish, almost purple look in her face and her lips were a little blue tint," Wells said. "She kept making a couple of gestures towards me that she was unable to breathe."Wells said he pulled the woman, 65, from her car and performed the Heimlich maneuver and dislodged "what ended up being a honey mustard nut from her airway.""She was very thankful. She just kept repeating, 'Thank you, thank you.' She was very scared and I would have been too if I was in that situation," he added.When paramedics arrived, Wells said the woman refused medical treatment and continued on her way.When asked if he felt like a hero, Wells said: "I feel like I was just doing my job and I was happy I was in the right place at the right time. It felt a lot better than issuing a citation or a warning, that's for sure."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Peace Power Napping(CHICAGO) -- Chicagoans looking for a break from the hustle and bustle of the windy city now have an on-demand nap studio where they can go for a snooze. Peace Power Napping, located across from Millennium Park, launched Nov. 20 and offers midday power naps through their app-based booking program.Founder Jennifer Thomas said in a press release that she hopes the community will feel a sense of peace with the service.  "With a focus on user-friendliness and convenience, our goal when designing Peace was to make it as easy as possible for city-dwellers to grab a restorative midday power nap," Thomas added.Users can book nap sessions through the app as needed or reserve time in advance over the phone or via email. Once nappers arrive at the studio they will find a pre-selected room number and can sleep for 30 minutes until an automatic light raises and soft music plays to signal it's time to wake up.The studio says it has five beds in their own sleep space complete with USB outlets, eye masks, blankets and other amenities.Each 30-minute nap will cost customers $20, but to celebrate the launch, the studio is offering free power naps on Black Friday and Cyber Monday.Peace Power Napping did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Perhaps the most daunting thing about Thanksgiving is not navigating the travel, the traffic or the mountains of food, but rather navigating the dinner conversation while keeping the peace. "Remember that you can endure just about anything for one day, and that includes uncomfortable family settings," Sharon Schweitzer, founder of Protocol & Etiquette Worldwide, told ABC News. "Keep your head high and let any annoyances roll off your back rather than letting them provoke you into an argument."She added, "If possible, seat yourself with family with whom you can share a pleasant conversation without unwanted interjections, and focus on enjoying the celebrations rather than avoiding particular people."Schweitzer shared with ABC News her expert tips for keeping the peace at the holiday dinner table:Play it safeStick with neutral conversational starters that won’t provoke a heated debate, such as sports, movies or upcoming holiday plans, Schweitzer suggests. "When you steer clear of hot topics such as politics or religion, you reduce the risk of clashing opinions. If someone brings up a sensitive subject at the table, politely change the topic or offer a gentle but firm conversational closer. Try saying something along the lines of, 'That’s an interesting point, but in the spirit of the holiday, let’s avoid discussing that at the table.Select seats carefully"If you’re hosting the event, consider a seating arrangement to avoid age-old disputes between Cousin Nancy and Uncle Ned,” she said. “Seat guests in conflict on opposite ends of the table, and place yourself near the center so that you can mediate the conversation if needed."Schweitzer also suggested keeping "taboo topics" off the table this holiday season. These include:Politics: "Political conversations are infamous for disrupting the peace at family dinners and family gatherings," she said. "For those with strong opinions, remember there is a time and place for everything. Adulting includes knowing when and what boundaries to respect. This includes refraining from bringing up politics, especially for the sake of peace, the host and the event.”Prying Questions: "While you may mean well by asking when your niece is planning to have children, or inquiring about someone’s relationship status, personal questions push all the wrong buttons," Schweitzer said. Avoid these kinds of questions and instead ask about their hobbies, their new job or their holiday plans.Religion: "Like politics, religion can stir up strong beliefs and cause disputes among family members of different faiths or philosophies. If you know you’re hosting guests with varying belief systems, avoid aggravating any tension by asking about the last time they went to church." Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A Georgia toddler received a successful kidney transplant on Wednesday, about one month after a hospital postponed his original operation when his father -- a perfect donor match -- violated his probation.A.J. Burgess, 2, received the transplant from a deceased donor Wednesday morning at a hospital in Atlanta, according to his family’s attorney, who called the surgery a "Thanksgiving miracle.""This is for them an unexpected Thanksgiving miracle, it's just a blessing," attorney Muwali Davis said in a statement. "They were just moving along, preparing for him to continue to go to dialysis, and then this happened, so it's just been an overwhelming experience for mom, dad, all of the family, who have watched that child who no one expected to live this long, and now for him to have a chance at a healthy life, for them it's unbelievable.“All they can say is just thank [you to] the family of the deceased person, thank God, and encourage people to sign up to be donors,” he added.Born without kidneys, A.J. had been undergoing nightly dialysis in order to survive. He was set to receive a kidney last month from his father, Anthony Dickerson, who was tested and proved to be a perfect match, but that transplant was postponed due to issues related to his father’s criminal record.Dickerson, 26, was arrested in December 2016 for violating his probation on weapons charges, according to criminal records. He had promised to give A.J. a kidney once he got out of jail, according to the boy's mother, Carmellia Burgess.“A.J. is out of surgery [and] is transplanted. His surgery was successful. He’s headed to recovery,” Burgess wrote in a Facebook post Wednesday. “Thank you everyone for your continued prayers [and] most of all thank you Lord.“I never thought my baby would [be] seeing this day,” she wrote in separate post Wednesday.She said her family received an outpouring of support when A.J.'s story made national headlines last month. On Tuesday, Burgess shared that actor Tyler Perry had gifted her and her family with a new car."OMGG I'm so overjoyed. I was in tears," she wrote in a Facebook post. "Thank you Tyler Perry (Madea) for blessing/buying my kids [and] I a new car. We are forever grateful."The family said it could not offer any details about the child’s donor, but said they were deceased."We don't have any information about the donors. Our understanding is that we would not be able to receive any [information] for a year from the time of the donation,” Davis said.A.J. is currently in recovery at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, according to Davis.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Coffee may not only give you a morning boost -- it also may have significant health benefits.So says a review by British scientists of more than 200 studies on coffee consumption and health, published Wednesday in BMJ, a British medical journal.“Coffee drinking appears safe within usual patterns of consumption,” said the University of Southhampton's Robin Poole, who led the study.According to the researchers, people who drink three to four cups of coffee a day are more likely to see health benefits than harm, experiencing lower rates of premature death, cardiovascular disease and liver disease.Drinking more coffee is also associated with a decrease in several types of cancer, including prostate cancer, endometrial cancer, skin cancer, leukemia and liver cancer, according to the researchers' findings. There were also lower rates of type 2 diabetes, gallstones and dementia associated with coffee consumption.Three of four cups of coffee offer the most health benefits, except for pregnant women or those who are prone to suffer fractures.Since this is an observational analysis of studies that already exist, it is impossible to account for many of the other factors that may influence these findings. More studies are needed to determine correlation versus causation. In other words, it might be that people with more healthy lives also drink coffee, but this news suggests that there are more positive findings than negative ones.Although the review found than there was more benefit than harm from coffee, the studies were not adjusted for important confounders, such as BMI, smoking, age, alcohol use, income, or education level.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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