Quantcast
WJBD - Entertainment

WJBD Radio

Images

 

"John Wick" - Lionsgate/Summit(NEW YORK) -- Here's a look at the new movies opening nationwide Friday:

Ouija -- The popular board game is adapted into a horror film in which a group of friends awakens dark powers. Olivia Cooke, Daren Kagasoff, Douglas Smith, Bianca Santos and Ana Coto star. Rated PG-13.

John Wick -- Keanu Reeves stars as a former hit man who comes out of retirement, seeking revenge against some gangsters. Adrianne Palicki, Bridget Moynahan, Dean Winters and Ian McShane co-star in the action flick, which is also screening in IMAX theaters. Rated R.

And expanding nationwide:

St. Vincent -- Bill Murray is Vincent, a war veteran who agrees to babysit his neighbor's 12-year-old son and subsequently exposes him to his sordid lifestyle. Melissa McCarthy and Naomi Watts also star in the comedy. Rated PG-13.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Cindy Ord/Getty Image(NEW YORK) -- British actor James Corden will make his debut as the host of The Late Late Show starting March 9, 2015, CBS announced Thursday.

"I can’t describe how thrilled and honored I am to be taking over from the brilliant Craig Ferguson," Corden said in a statement. "To be asked to host such a prestigious show on America’s #1 network is hugely exciting. I can’t wait to get started, and will do my very best to make a show America will enjoy."

The late night show will tape in Los Angeles with Ben Winston serving as the show’s executive producer.

Ferguson, who has hosted the show for 10 years, will depart the CBS series on Dec. 19. He revealed his departure right after David Letterman announced his retirement from CBS' Late Show. He will be replaced by Stephen Colbert sometime next year.

Corden can currently be seen on the big screen with Keira Knightley in Begin Again. The actor also has a role in Disney's Into the Woods, due out in December.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Weinstein Company(NEW YORK) — St. Vincent isn’t a particularly complex story. In fact, it’s quite simple. Bill Murray’s Vincent is a different story entirely.
 
When we first meet Vincent of Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, we quickly learn he doesn’t have enough money to pay off any of his debts, which include his bar tab, gambling arrears, and money owed for services rendered by his favorite pregnant Russian prostitute, Daka, played by the vastly underrated Naomi Watts (just two Oscar nominations is not enough). There’s also the matter of Vincent’s manner: it’s awful.
 
While passed out on his kitchen floor, with a bruised and bloodied face to show for it, Vincent’s fortunes change when a moving van backs into his fence and breaks a branch off of a tree, damaging both. The van belongs to his new neighbors, Maggie (Melissa McCarthy) and her young son, Oliver (Jaeden Lieberher). While Vincent wants nothing to do with them, he does want money for the fence and tree.
 
Maggie’s having a tough time. She’s in the middle of a divorce and Oliver’s father is refusing to pay child support.  She desperately wants Oliver to have a good education, so she decides to send him to a Catholic school, even though the young man is Jewish.  Oliver returns from his first day of school to discover he’s locked out of the house, so he asks Vincent for help. The curmudgeonly alcoholic reluctantly lends a hand, and so begins the unlikely friendship at the heart of the movie -- and St. Vincent has a lot of heart.
 
This isn’t the most original story, but writer and first-time feature director Theodore Melfi does a beautiful job capturing the idiosyncrasies and latent hypocrisy of the human condition.  One of my favorite scenes involves Vincent weaving his way through the long velvet ropes and stanchions of an empty line inside his bank. Here’s a man who seems utterly self-absorbed, who doesn’t play well with others, abuses alcohol, sleeps with a pregnant prostitute and is in deep to a loan shark, yet here he follows the rules and walks the entirety of the empty bank line.
 
St. Vincent is the most complete performance of Bill Murray’s career. At first glance, Vincent feels like a familiar and predictable character, but Murray’s deft touch provides this protagonist with many complex layers. He doesn’t do it alone, though. He has a few terrific scenes with Watts but Murray’s best work comes with young Lieberher, a baby-faced 11-year-old who’s probably one of the more natural actors you‘ll see at that age. Like Vincent himself, St. Vincent isn’t perfect, but Murray’s performance is.
 
Four out of five stars.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Universal(NEW YORK) — One of the keys to a good ghost story/horror movie is putting something on the screen we can relate to -- and who hasn’t played with a Ouija board at some point in their lives?
 
In other words, Ouija should’ve been a slam dunk, with help from the usual horror movie fright tactics and unexpected loud noises all designed to scare the stuffing out of us.  Unfortunately, Ouija never moves beyond these clichés, but lack of originality isn’t all that haunts this supernatural tale.
 
We start out with besties Laine (Olivia Cooke) and Debbie (Shelley Hennig) as little girls, playing with a Ouija board. It’s mildly creepy. Cut to eight or nine years later, when they’re apparently seniors in high school, and we see teen Debbie playing with an old, wooden Ouija board -- by herself. She says goodbye to whatever she thinks she’s talking to, then burns the board. Laine shows up and begs her friend to hang out with her.  Debbie declines, and with a little nudging from an evil spirit, she instead hangs herself.
 
By the way, this scenario is the best-executed sequence in the entire movie, because the dialogue and acting are limited.
 
As you no doubt have already figured out, Laine is going to try to contact Debbie, using a Ouija board and with the help of her friends and her Goth little sister.  Predictably, all of them are going to be tormented by the spirit they contact. *Yawn*
 
Ouija is a horror movie that feels, at times, like it was written with an actual Ouija board (ghost writer?). The dialogue and acting are scarier than the movie itself, which will disappoint not only anyone who’s ever used a Ouija board, but also anyone expecting a truly frightening movie experience.
 
One-and-a-half out of five stars.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


ABC/Mark Levine(NEW YORK) -- Luke Bryan is Nashville's reigning golden boy. His song, "Roller Coaster," is just one of five singles off his double-platinum album, Crash My Party, which helped skyrocket him to an elite club of country stars who are able to sell out stadiums.

Nightline caught up with Bryan on the road at his record-selling stadium tour in Chicago and also in Florida on his Farm Tour. Bryan's Farm Tour is focused on playing shows in rural communities that might not otherwise have the means to get to the big cities to see his shows.

"My main focus truly with Farm Tour is embracing small communities that aren't used to putting these things on," he said. "Out here, more than ever, people come up to us and say, ‘This is our first concert.’ ... we’re five minutes away from their back porch."

While Bryan, one of country music's hottest stars, has earned wide popularity with his feel-good music and party-stomping concerts, here are a few things you might not know about him:

1. Bryan is a Small-Town Farm Boy with Allergies

Growing up in the small town of Leesburg, Georgia, Bryan spent much of his childhood outdoors, either working on his father's peanut farm or hunting and fishing.

The country star said he has always battled allergies, even now while on his Farm Tour, playing concerts in small towns.

"I do have funny allergies, and we're out in these hay fields and it does get to me," Bryan said. "I grew up outdoors, working in agriculture, and I used to battle the allergies back then but hey it was all a part of making a living. It still kind of is. You got to get out there and make it happen."

2. He's Handy With a Crossbow

Bryan has loved hunting since he was a kid, and is even a part-owner of an outdoor company with Willy Robertson of Duck Dynasty fame. When he's on tour, Bryan likes to bring his crossbow and a few other "toys" with him to practice shooting.

"I don't remember my life before I was hunting and fishing and doing stuff in the outdoors," Bryan said. "I think the biggest thing as a hunter is to be prepared to hunt. Make sure all your stuff works right."

3. He Pays Attention to Fans' Tweets

With 3.6 million Twitter followers, Bryan gets a lot of tweets from fans, but he says he pays attention to what they ask for. Some he says have even influenced what songs he decides to play at shows.

"They didn’t even know they were advising me. They just said something about, ‘Why don’t you do this anymore’ and then we’ll put it back in the set," he said. "I don’t think you can ever stop gaining knowledge from, first of all, the fans. They have to tell you your direction."

4. He Finds the 'Bro County' Label 'Aggravating'


In many of his songs, Bryan croons about partying, falling in love, small-town riverbank living and popping open a can of beer. His first hit, "All My Friends Say," in 2007 became a frat-boy anthem, which led to some critics pegging his music as "bro country," a label he despises.

"It really aggravates me," Bryan said. "It’s a derogatory term, in my opinion, of what me and the people that are doing this music… Yeah do I sing about a truck and a beer on one song, but then do I sing about a completely different subject matter. I mean, listen to the whole album and don’t judge me on one song."

5. He Plans to 'Tame' the Dance Moves in Years to Come

Bryan’s hip-shaking dance moves (he even has a song called "Country Girl (Shake It For Me)") and his tight jeans are so famous among his fans that there are Twitter handles and Facebook fan pages dedicated to "Luke Bryan's Butt.”"But while the 38-year-old country star says he just does his thing when he’s on stage, he plans to tone down the moves as he gets older.

"Ten years from now will I be on stage dancing? No I won’t be... I would certainly say it will be much more tamed," Bryan said. "I’m up there being really free, relaxed and chilled out ... and that’s really our basis for getting up there and dancing and having fun."

"And if fans want to create fan pages dedicated to my butt I will take that as flattering," he added.

6. Bryan, His Wife and Baby Slept on Suitcases on the Old Tour Bus

Supporting Bryan through it all has been his wife Caroline Boyer, who first met Bryan when she was just 18 and they were in college.

"He is completely normal," she said. "I think the hardest thing for me as a wife is that people think we live this certain lifestyle that’s totally opposite to your average mom or dad and that’s just not. It’s different because Daddy travels a lot but really, it’s just normal."

The couple have two boys, 6-year-old Bo and 4-year-old Tatum. In the early days, Bryan said his wife used to come out on the road with him, and when they were new parents, the couple had to rough it a bit on his old tour bus.

"When our first child was 3 weeks old and we were on the bus and we would make the back lounge that had two sofas, we'd make a bed that was just from suitcases and then we would lay a palette over the suitcases and join the couches," Boyer said. "The band had to hear Bo scream all the night for the first couple years."

7. Music Has Helped Him Through Losing His Siblings

Bryan's older brother was killed in a car accident as he was preparing to move to Nashville to launch his music career, and his older sister died suddenly a few days after he made his Grand Ole Opry debut. Bryan says their memories are with him constantly, including the night he won Entertainer of the Year at the 2013 ACM Awards.

"Losing my brother and my sister, that took such a negative emotional toll on me and my family and my friends and when good things happen to me through music and via this path of music it helps my whole family," he said. "When I won the ACM Entertainer of the Year I think we were all backstage and we were all crying backstage and really like sobbing crying ... but we all kept going, ‘Wow this is what being really joyous feels like,' because we had dealt with the complete opposite of that, so it was an amazing moment."

"Anytime I'm in a full arena I just can’t help to think, ‘God I know my brother and sister would be coming to a lot of these shows," he added.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





Welcome to Our New Website

Same WJBD but with more content than ever before. We will have more features up and running in no time.


Follow Us At

 
 

This Site logo