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Michael Yarish/AMC(NEW YORK) -- Cigarettes and hard liquor may not be what immediately springs to mind at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, but that is exactly what was unveiled Friday in homage to the massively popular television series Mad Men.

Now in its final season, the serial drama's creators at AMC cable network and Lionsgate have gone on a blitz of farewell events including screenings and speeches.

And now its antihero, actor Jon Hamm’s drinking and womanizing marketing executive Don Draper, will have his suit and other artifacts on display in the nation’s capital.

It will be part of an exhibit that examines American business from the Founding Fathers up through the present day -- including the notorious marketing practices of the 1960’s that sets the backdrop for the show. The Smithsonian says Mad Men was specifically selected because of the series’ attention to detail from the time period -- much of the set uses actual antique items from the mid 20th century or recreates them in painstaking detail.

The items on display run from high culture to the mundane -- high-priced wristwatches and top shelf liquor stand next to toothbrushes, cartons of Lucky Strike cigarettes and a simple kitchen apron. It also revealed that the institution had been consulted by AMC in the recreation of some period items, including old telegraph printouts, although that scene was later cut.

"It is very hard to recreate even a moment from yesterday,” series creator Matthew Weiner said.

“I have always been interested in telling a story on the human scale, and this is the archaeological site of humanity from this period. We're glad that we saved these things and recreated these things because so much of it was thrown away. It was fun to try to recreate a check stub,” he added.

Hamm also attended alongside costars Christina Hendricks and John Slattery.

The Smithsonian’s “American Enterprise” exhibit will be opened to the public on July 1st. Mad Men will now be joining the likes of Sesame Street, Seinfeld, and All in the Family in its halls.


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Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Cigarettes and hard liquor may not be what immediately springs to mind at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, but that is exactly what was unveiled today in homage to the massively popular television series "Mad Men."

Now in its final season, the serial drama's creators at AMC cable network and Lionsgate have gone on a blitz of farewell events including screenings and speeches.

And now its antihero, actor Jon Hamm’s drinking and womanizing marketing executive Don Draper, will have his suit and other artifacts on display in the nation’s capital.

Jon Hamm Opens Up About Rehab Stint

VIDEO: Tour the Sets of Mad Men with Star, Creator

It will be part of an exhibit that examines American business from the Founding Fathers up through the present day -- including the notorious marketing practices of the 1960’s that sets the backdrop for the show. The Smithsonian says "Mad Men" was specifically selected because of the series’ attention to detail from the time period -- much of the set uses actual antique items from the mid 20th century or recreates them in painstaking detail.

 

PHOTO: Some objects, costumes, props, sketches and a script from the AMC and Lionsgate TV series, Mad Men that were donated to the National Museum of American History in Washington, are displayed, March 27, 2015. 
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo
PHOTO: Some objects, costumes, props, sketches and a script from the AMC and Lionsgate TV series, "Mad Men" that were donated to the National Museum of American History in Washington, are displayed, March 27, 2015.

 

The items on display run from high culture to the mundane -- high-priced wristwatches and top shelf liquor stand next to toothbrushes, cartons of Lucky Strike cigarettes and a simple kitchen apron. It also revealed that the institution had been consulted by AMC in the recreation of some period items, including old telegraph printouts, although that scene was later cut.

"It is very hard to recreate even a moment from yesterday,” series creator Matthew Weiner said.

“I have always been interested in telling a story on the human scale, and this is the archaeological site of humanity from this period. We're glad that we saved these things and recreated these things because so much of it was thrown away. It was fun to try to recreate a check stub,” he added.

 

PHOTO: Some objects, costumes, props, sketches and a script from the AMC and Lionsgate TV series, Mad Men that were donated to the National Museum of American History in Washington, are displayed, March 27, 2015. 
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo
PHOTO: Some objects, costumes, props, sketches and a script from the AMC and Lionsgate TV series, "Mad Men" that were donated to the National Museum of American History in Washington, are displayed, March 27, 2015.

 

Hamm also attended alongside costars Christina Hendricks and John Slattery.

The Smithsonian’s “American Enterprise” exhibit will be opened to the public on July 1st. Mad Men will now be joining the likes of Sesame Street, Seinfeld, and All in the Family in its halls.


Michael Yarish/AMC(NEW YORK) — How would Roger Sterling fit in the world of hip-hop music? We may never find out.

The actor who plays Roger on AMC's Mad Men, John Slattery, says he was offered a role on the Fox hit Empire. Empire was co-created by Danny Strong, who has guest starred on Mad Men.

Slattery commented on Strong's success while speaking with The Daily Beast, saying, "That guy is on top of the world right now with Empire. If he reads this, 'Danny, I need a job!'"

He then revealed that Strong "actually asked me if I wanted to be on Empire, and I think I let that ship sail. I don’t know who I would’ve played...some white dude."

We'll still get to see Slattery on TV when Mad Men begins its final run of episodes on April 5.


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


Kevin Winter/Getty Images/Craig Sjodin/ABC(NEW YORK) — Drea de Matteo, who played Adriana La Cerva on The Sopranos, was among the dozens of people who lost their homes after an apartment building explosion led to a seven-alarm fire in New York City Thursday.

The actress posted photos of the devastation on her Instagram account. One photo caption read, "NYC's finest trying to put out the flames to mine n many others apartments. Speechless...for those that are hurt." Another caption read, "A hole where my NYC home of the last 22 years once stood...RIP 123 2nd Avenue."

Modern Family actress Sarah Hyland was also affected by the news. "I grew up across the street. Thinking of my childhood neighborhood. Explosion shreds East Village, building collapses," she tweeted.

Four people were in critical condition and at least 15 others were injured after the fire in Manhattan's East Village Thursday afternoon. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said preliminary evidence "suggests a gas-related explosion," but the investigation is ongoing.

 

A hole where my NYC home of the last 22 years once stood... RIP 123 2nd Avenue ð  ð " "Ã° 

A photo posted by Drea De Matteo (@dreadematteo) on Mar 26, 2015 at 4:18pm PDT

 

 

 


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


ABC/Rick Rowell(NEW YORK) — Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey has been booked to speak at May's commencement for the University of Houston.  How much its going to cost, however, has become something of a mystery.

Celebrity Talent International, which books stars like McConaughey for speaking engagements, insisted to the Houston Chronicle that the actor's fees should remain secret because, "a reporter or someone else" could misuse that information and, "take things out of context."

While the organization is remaining mum about an exact figure, its website shows the actor can be booked for anywhere from $150,000-$499,000 at minimum for a domestic event and, at minimum, $500,000 to a million bucks for an event overseas.

The school won't disclose the exact fee, either, citing the booking agency's confidentiality clause -- which the agency has lobbied the Texas Attorney General to enforce. Celebrity Talent International's Glenn Richardson noted celebrities have been "unfairly targeted often" over the release of sensitive information like salaries. Furthermore, Richardson noted, the speaking fee leaking would be bad for business.


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


ABC/Rick Rowell(LEICESTER, England) — Benedict Cumberbatch portrays the late British monarch Richard the Third in a new BBC drama, and is also a distant relative, so it was fitting that he read a poem Thursday at the reinterment of the king whose remains were found underneath a parking lot 530 years after his death.

King Richard died in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field.

Cumberbatch read a 14-line poem written by Britain's poet laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, during a reburial ceremony at England's Leicester Cathedral that was attended by descendants of those who fought in the battle.

The poem, simply titled Richard, began, "My bones scripted in light upon cold soil, a human brail, my skull scarred by a crown, emptied of history" and included the phrase "grant me the carving of my name," which refers to the fact that the King's grave was lost for centuries, with no tombstone to mark its location.

Richard the Third was the last British king to die in battle. He was succeeded by Henry the Seventh.

Cumberbatch portrays the monarch in the BBC drama The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses. The three-part series will air on PBS, but no air date has been announced.


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.





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