• United Airlines(CHICAGO) -- The officers who forcibly removed Dr. David Dao from a United Airlines flight earlier this month said the passenger responded in an "aggressive manner" when he was ordered to give up his seat and flailed his arms as he fought with the responders, according to a Chicago Department of Aviation incident report obtained by ABC News on Monday.Dao, a 69-year-old physician from Kentucky, allegedly acted "violently” and yelled "I am not leaving this flight that I paid money for. I don't care if I get arrested,’” when the responding officers tried to persuade him to get off the flight, according to the incident report, which was released Monday in response to a public records requests.ABC News also obtained police dispatch audio that suggests the responding officers and medics were operating under the assumption that the flight was overbooked and that Dao was creating a disturbance on the plane. However, the flight was never overbooked; instead, four passengers were asked to get off the flight so that four United employees could take their seats.The report reveals for the first time the names the four officers who were involved in the April 9 incident, for which Dao said left him with injuries that he is still being treated.In a supplemental incident report, one of the officers said Dao’s “combative” flailing motions made the officers lose their grip on him, causing him to fall and hit his his mouth on the armrest across from him.That report also stated that a responding officer eventually removed Dao "by dragging him due to the fact that the subject would not stand up."In a separate report released Monday, the Chicago Police Department said Dao was seen hitting his face on an armrest as aviation officers "attempted to escort" him off of the flight.The incident, which was videotaped by other passengers at the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, sparked a national outcry and three of the involved aviation officers were subsequently placed on leave, according to the aviation department.United CEO Oscar Munoz apologized for the incident and has vowed that the company will conduct a "thorough review” of the "truly horrific event.”The aviation department also released its use of force policy, which indicated that security personnel should use force only when "reasonably necessary to defend a human life, effect an arrest or control a person," and that the force used "shall only be that which is necessary to overcome the resistance being offered by an offender and to effect lawful objectives."The department said the policy was sent to all officers in the aftermath of the incident.Dao’s attorney, Thomas Demetrio, told ABC News on Monday that he and Dao are "getting ready" to take legal action.Demetrio is also representing an American Airlines passenger who is at the center of another viral video posted to Facebook on Friday. That footage shows an intense confrontation between a flight attendant and at least two passengers after a woman tried to bring her double-wide stroller on board a plane.
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  • Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Bill O'Reilly is "sad" that he is no longer hosting his "O'Reilly Factor" program on Fox News, but says, in the wake of the sexual harassment claims that drove him from his spot in front of the camera, that he is "confident the truth will come out."The conservative commentator made his first spoken comments since being fired from his show last week on his "No Spin News" podcast Monday. O'Reilly admitted he was "surprised" how the situation transpired while he was on vacation in Italy last week, but did not delve into many details.O'Reilly has denied all allegations."I can't say a lot because there's much stuff going on right now," said O'Reilly at the top of the podcast. "But I can tell you I'm very confident the truth will come out and when it does, I don't know if you're going to be surprised, but I think you're going to be shaken as I am.""There's a lot of stuff involved here," he continued.Fox News' decision to dismiss O'Reilly came in the aftermath of an April 1 New York Times report which described settlements he reached with five women who accused him of harassment. O'Reilly has denied the misconduct claims levied against him.Following his dismissal, O'Reilly released a statement in which he called it "tremendously disheartening" that his relationship with Fox News was ending due to "completely unfounded" claims.On Monday's podcast, O'Reilly pledged to maintain his four-day-per-week podcasting schedule, broadcasting in the format he has utilized for years in addition to his television work.Continuing in the podcasting sphere may prove lucrative for O'Reilly. A 2016 study by the Pew Research Center revealed that some 21 percent of Americans who were 12 or older listened to a podcast during the previous month. That was up from 12 percent in 2013.
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  • Kitty Hawk(NEW YORK) -- Kitty Hawk -- a Silicon-Valley startup named for the Wright Brothers' first controlled flight and backed by Google co-founder Larry Page -- released the prototype for its first flying car on Monday.The ultralight, one-seater aircraft is "safe, tested, and legal to operate in the United States in uncongested areas," the company said in a statement. "You don't need a pilot's license and you'll learn to fly it in minutes."Enthusiasts will be able to purchase the Kitty Hawk Flyer -- designed for use only over water -- "by the end of 2017" for as-yet unannounced price."We believe when everyone has access to personal flight, a new, limitless world of opportunity will open up to them," the company says on its website.Kitty Hawk is not the only company that's received capital to develop alternative air transportation.Page reportedly invested in another company, Zee.Aero, working to develop an electric plane that can take off and land vertically and a competing company, Ehang, recently claimed its passenger drone will launch regular service this summer.Even big-name jet-makers like Airbus have unveiled flying car concepts designed to relieve urban congestion, with prototype test flights slated for later this year.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- After investors around the world eyed the first round of France's presidential election, U.S. stocks and other global markets closed in the green on Monday.The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 216.13 (+1.05 percent) to finish at 20,763.89.The Nasdaq jumped 73.30 (+1.24 percent) to close at 5,983.82, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,374.15, up 25.46 (+1.08 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices sunk nearly 1 percent; about $49 a barrel.French Election: Centrist Emmanuel Macron received most of the votes in the first round of France's presidential election on Sunday. Far-right leader Marine Le Pen, who has campaigned on pulling France out of the European Union, will face him in a run-off on May 7. The euro hit a more than five-month high and European stock markets surged after the results. Winners and Losers: Shares of Wendy's Co. climbed nearly 2 percent and fast food rival McDonald's reached an all-time high ahead of its earnings report's release.Hasbro, Inc. beat investors' expectations in earnings and sales in the first quarter thanks to digital gaming. Shares for the toy maker soared 6 percent.News that Jimmy Choo is exploring a sale sent shares in the British luxury shoe brand up about 10 percent.
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  • Courtesy Mercer Vine(LOS ANGELES) -- The California home where actress Marilyn Monroe was found dead in 1962 is now on the market for $6.9 million.The home, located in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, is described an "authentic 1929 Hacienda," by the real estate agency that listed the home, Mercer Vine."When you walk the house and grounds, you’re immediately struck by its serenity and warmth," the home's listing agent, Lisa Optican, said in a statement. "It’s an absolute oasis in the heart of one of the best neighborhoods in Los Angeles."The four-bedroom, three-bathroom home features details like beamed ceilings and terra cotta tile floors and comes with a swimming pool, citrus grove and guest house. It is described by Mercer Vine as a home "steeped in Hollywood glamour."It was at the Brentwood home that Monroe was found in the middle of the night lying face down in her bed clutching a telephone receiver, according to an account in The Los Angeles Times at the time.The Times reported that Monroe, who was 36 years old when she died, had bought the house not long before her death for $75,000 and that the home was partially furnished.Monroe herself spoke about the home during a 1962 interview with Life Magazine that took place inside."Anybody who likes my house, I’m sure I’ll get along with," Monroe told Richard Meryman, then an associate editor at Life.In his own essay about the interview with Monroe, just months before she died, Meryman described the house saying, "It was a small, three-bedroom house built in Mexican style, the first home entirely her own she had ever had."He continued, "She exulted in it. On a special trip to Mexico she had carefully searched in roadside stands and shops and even factories to find just the right things to put in it. The large items had not arrived -- nor was she ever to see them installed."Monroe's former home was last sold in November 2012 for $5.1 million, a Mercer Vine spokeswoman told ABC News.
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  • Dina Mitchell(NEW YORK) -- A Wisconsin woman said she suffered second-degree burns on her arm after her Fitbit tracker exploded.Dina Mitchell said she had owned her Fitbit Flex 2 for about two weeks when the fitness tracking device allegedly caught fire on her arm while she was reading a book on Tuesday night."I was literally just sitting and reading when my Fitbit exploded,” Mitchell told ABC News in an emailed statement on Sunday. "It was either defective or really mad I was sitting still so long… I don’t know. Either way, It burned the heck out of my arm."She said she ripped the device off of her arm as it was still burning and tossed it onto the floor. Mitchell said her doctor had to pick pieces of plastic and rubber out of her arm after the incident.An emergency care provider in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, area told ABC News affiliate KTRK-TV that Mitchell was treated the day after she said the incident occurred.Mitchell, who said she got the tracker as a birthday gift, said Fitbit offered her a free replacement device after she notified the company about the apparent malfunction.A spokesperson for Fitbit told ABC News that the company is investigating the issue."We are extremely concerned about Ms. Mitchell’s report regarding her Flex 2 and take it very seriously, as the health and safety of our customers is our top priority," the company said in a statement.“We are not aware of any other complaints of this nature and see no reason for people to stop wearing their Flex 2,” the company added.Fitbit said it planned to share more information as soon as it was able to.
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