• iStock/Thinkstock(CABIN CREEK, Colo.) -- Enjoy solitude? An entire town in Colorado that's 45 minutes from Denver could be yours for $350,000.
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  • Hooters(DENVER) -- Several parents in Denver were outraged after recently discovering photos of their young boys posing next to Hooters girls at a Cub Scout camp.Parents told ABC's Denver affiliate KMGH-TV that they were shocked after seeing the photos on the local Hooters' Facebook page.Though the photos appear to have been taken down, several parents said they were still upset after learning the restaurant had actually sponsored the Cub Scout camp.The Boy Scouts of America Denver Area Council confirmed that Hooters approached the council about working with the scouts and that the restaurant had given a financial contribution to the camp, KMGH-TV reported.A manager at the Hooters in Denver also told KMGH that the restaurant provided three of its employees each day as volunteers for the three-day Cub Scout camp.Michelle Kettleborough, mom to a 7-year-old cub scout who attended the camp, told KMGH said she was in disbelief when she picked up her son and noticed him wearing a Hooters hat."I step back for a second, and I take a look and I'm like, 'Are they wearing Hooters visors? Wait a minute,'" Kettleborough said. "Quite honestly we're questioning whether we're going to keep him in the organization at all next year."Marsha Corn, another concerned parent, told KMGH-TV she thought that the "philosophies" of the Boys Scouts and Hooters were "polar opposites.""We love the Scouts, [but] we think they made a very poor choice," Corn said. "And what I would like -- and what I think would go a long way, again -- is some accountability."Corn said the local Boy Scouts chapter dismissed her concerns when she wrote an email asking about Hooters' sponsorship of the camp.According to the email reply obtained by KMGH-TV, a district executive with the Boy Scouts told Corn, "The restaurant assisted with the costs of putting on the camp, and through their community volunteering several of their waitresses donated their time to help staff the camp. Glad to hear your son had such a good time."A spokesperson for Boy Scouts of America in Denver told KMGH-TV in a statement that a "group of trained volunteers mistakenly wore the wrong attire" to a local Cub Scout Day Camp. The spokesperson added that the issue "was addressed by our Council leadership" and that "[w]e extend our apologies for this mistake and look forward to continuing our mission of serving youth in the Denver area."ABC News' calls to Hooters and the Boy Scouts of America Denver Area Council were not immediately returned.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Christi Shaw was U.S. president of the pharmaceutical giant Novartis when she stunned the business world by walking away from it all.She did it to care for her older sister, Sherry Whitford, who was diagnosed with bone marrow cancer more than two years ago. Whitford was facing a potentially bleak diagnosis but had been admitted into a clinical trial. With the trial located far from her St. Louis home, Whitford would need full-time care. Shaw decided to be there.“I still feel very comfortable as I did the day I made the decision,” Shaw, 49, told ABC News.The middle child of three sisters and married with three children of her own, Shaw said she and Whitford have “been in this journey together” since the diagnosis.The decision she announced publicly in April put Shaw’s nearly 30-year career on pause, but she said leaving her role at the billion-dollar corporation “wasn’t a difficult decision.”She explained that Whitford had taken eight weeks to care for their mother when she had breast cancer.“This decision was a logical step from a family perspective,” Shaw said. “I actually feel very lucky that I’m able to take this time.""Many times we go through life and we just keep doing what we were doing because that’s what we’ve always done,” she said.Shaw recognizes she has resources that many others don’t. Financially she can afford to take time off and has a strong network within the medical community.Shaw and Whitford plan to create a foundation to help families in similar situations who don’t have the financial resources to take time off from work or travel and stay in another city for a clinical trial.Shaw acknowledged that she wasn’t good at “sitting still,” and it has taken some time for her to adjust. She said she constantly checks email while she waits “an hour-and-a-half” for a doctor’s appointment.While her future career track is in question, Shaw said caring for her sister is leaving a lasting impression.Though she had “a great career,” she said, “If I look back, the place I need to be right now is with my sister.”Her sister feels like she hit the family jackpot, too.“I’m just very, very lucky to have you as a sister in my life,” Whitford said to Shaw.“Ditto,” Shaw replied.
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  • Tesla(NEW YORK) -- Tesla announced a disappointing miss in deliveries for quarter two over the holiday weekend.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) --  Mario Batali has 28 restaurants, 10 cookbooks (with an 11th on the way), a daytime cooking show (The Chew), a food emporium in New York City (Eataly), and now plans for a food theme park.“We’re working on a green gastronomic theme park in Bologna, [Italy],” Batali told ABC News’ Dan Harris during an interview on his podcast, “10% Happier.” “It’ll be about food decisions but it will all be interactive. I’m not sure if we’re having rides yet but we’re trying to figure them out.”The world-renowned chef and restaurateur sat down with Harris to talk about how he got into cooking, what he thinks about veganism, his prediction for the next food trend and how meditation has helped change him for the better.  Batali said he started practicing mantra-based Transcendental Meditation (TM) six years ago after having “a couple of dinners” with Jerry Seinfeld and his wife, Jessica, who suggested it. Batali said he now practices twice a day for 20 minutes, and that it’s helped calm his temper.“I just wasn’t able to rid myself of little bits of anger about stupid s--- like waiting in line for a long time in traffic and someone not turning, or someone on my team not doing exactly what I told them to do,” Batali said. “After about a month of doing TM ... it allowed me to more carefully or more slowly react to something that was offending me, bothering me.”Growing up in a “food-obsessed family” in Washington State, Batali said his first restaurant job was at the Stromboli sandwich place Stuff Yer Face in New Brunswick, New Jersey, while he was in college at Rutgers University. From there, he studied at the Le Cordon Bleu in London and eventually started working in the New York City restaurant scene.Batali had a near-death experience when a rare cerebral aneurysm ruptured as he was about to open a new restaurant.“I was at the dishwashing machine at Lupa,” Batali said, referring to one of his 10 N.Y.C. restaurants. Then, he said, the voice of the person he was talking to became muffled. He said it felt like “a headache in the back of my neck,” and he was taken to the hospital, then rushed into surgery. He said he’s lucky to have survived.“Five out of 10 [people] die immediately,” Batali said. “Four of the remaining five have permanent damage ... [I’m] the one out of 10.”Today, he is one of the world’s most respected chefs. He even has a trademark outside of the kitchen -- his orange Crocs. He loves the foam clogs so much he became a part-time spokesman for the company.“I take a lot of heat on the fashion blogs, but none in the comfort blogs,” he joked.In fact, when Crocs told him they were discontinuing his signature color, Batali asked the company to make him a microbatch, which worked out to be 200 orange pairs.“I quickly did the math, ‘I use two and a half pairs a year. Yeah, that’s a lifetime supply. I’ll take them,’” he said, laughing. “They’re hanging in my office across these little strings, and when I need a new pair, I go get them, like for a big fancy event. If I was going to have dinner with [President] Obama, I’d get a new pair out because they’re shinier.”  The world of famous restaurateurs and celebrity chefs has become more crowded in recent years, bolstered by daytime cooking shows like “The Chew,” but also competitive cooking shows like “Top Chef,” and TV series featuring elite chefs crisscrossing the globe as adventurous food tour guides -- not to mention social media. But when asked how much competition or jealousy existed among these chefs, Batali said, there’s a difference between the two.“Jealousy is when someone does something really good and you’re just proud of them, but you
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  • Steve Dobbs(FULLERTON, Calif.) -- One grandpa built something extremely magical in his backyard for all his lucky grandkids to enjoy.Steve Dobbs, of Fullerton, California, constructed his very own Disneyland-inspired backyard theme park called Dobbsland, painstakingly building a 100-foot-long working roller coaster, a “Sleeping Princess” castle and a “Winifred-the-Poof” ride, just to name a few.“He’s always wanted to build a ride at Disneyland,” Dobbs’ daughter, Cori Linder, told ABC News. “He’s such a visionary and I love that and he was like, ‘Why not build it in my backyard for my grandkids?’”So that’s exactly what he did. A retired Boeing aerospace engineer who now teaches engineering in college, this was small potatoes compared to his other huge career accomplishments, but was so much larger in sentimental significance."My interest perhaps started when I was 8 years old," said Dobbs, 68. "I lived about 2 miles from Disneyland and watched it being built on our bicycles. But my friends and I could not figure out what this place was going to be until it finally opened. The older brother of my friend worked at the gate and let us sneak in during the summer when it was it too busy, so for those first few years we played in Disneyland like it was my backyard."It all started once upon a time, eight years ago, when Dobbs got the itch to create a homemade “Pirates of the Caribbean”-themed ride. He used cardboard to construct the pint-sized pirate ships and even had two ping pong shooters for dramatic cannons.“He hadn’t ever planned on doing a theme park,” said Linder. “He had my kids over and thought, ‘How can I keep them entertained and make it fun and get their imagination going?’ He put them in this whole fantasy type of thing as pirates. It was very homegrown. I don’t think he ever thought he’d build a theme park, he just got carried away and more grandkids came and it’s just magical.”Dobbsland kept evolving over time and eventually he enlisted the help of his students at California State Polytechnic University in Pomona as backup reinforcements. Together they crafted the “Madderhorn Roller Coaster” out of PVC plastic pipe, which can go up to 12-miles-per-hour.“It was done in May. He had a launch party,” Linder said. “He had a guy certify it as a legit roller coaster.”There are also now working teacups that spin, an airplane learning station, a car land and a "Finding Nemo"-esque submarine.“It’s dark and he made thing glow inside,” said a proud Linder.His wife doesn’t even mind giving up her entire backyard, as long as the kids and her husband are happy.“My mom is so supportive,” said Linder. “She sometimes just looks in the backyard and shakes her head, but she just wants to see him happy and enjoy his retirement. He’s really fulfilling his passion, which she loves.”As for the grandchildren, “They love it. They just see him as the most creative person in the world,” Linder explained. “He wanted all his grandkids to have that magical experience. My kids aren’t even surprised. They’ve grown up with this very creative grandfather."She added: “To me what’s really inspirational about this whole story is that, here’s a guy who’s accomplished a lot in his life and he’s still finding the joy in giving that experience to others. He didn’t do this for himself. To create that experience for people to remember and celebrate, you see the joy on his face watching people enjoy it, and that to me is timeless and absolutely precious.”
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