• Photodisc/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- A Boston taxi driver turned in hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of cash he found in a backpack in his car, police said.After dropping a passenger off at his destination of Massachusetts Avenue and Tremont Street near Northeastern University's campus Friday afternoon, the driver noticed the bag, filled with about $187,000 in cash, sitting in the backseat, according to the Boston Police Department.The driver immediately brought the bag to police headquarters, which received a call from the passenger as they were taking inventory of its contents, police said.Police released the bag back to the owner after he arrived at police headquarters and provided proof of ownership."This hackney driver exhibited exemplary behavior and his honest deed should be recognized," said Boston Police Department Commissioner William Evans. "His actions represent the high standards that our department has for our drivers."Police did not comment on why the passenger was carrying such a large amount of cash.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Mother-daughter writing duo Lisa Scottoline and Francesca Serritella attribute their ability to write seven books together to one thing: love.“Love, love, love is the answer, the secret,” Scottoline told ABC News’ Deborah Roberts in an interview that aired Monday on Good Morning America.“I'm an only child. She was a single mother for much of my upbringing. So that comes naturally,” Serritella said of their loving relationship. “And it doesn't mean it's always smooth sailing.”The pair’s latest book, “I’ve Got Sand in All the Wrong Places,” recollects humorous, and sometimes poignant, moments in their lives.Scottoline began her career as a lawyer but -- even though a divorce left her a single mother when Serritella was an infant -- she longed to stay home with her daughter, and so switched careers.“I just started to try” writing books, she said. “And after five years of rejection, really hard, broke times, I got published.”The now bestselling crime novelist’s first book was a hit, a success she said she still does not take for granted.“I’m shocked every day,” Scottoline said. “No joke, really. Blessed. Lucky. Amazed.”Serritella described what it was like to watch her mom overcome the odds in the publishing world.“She built it slowly, and I got to see that perseverance and her work ethic and see her push through like she said, [with] initial struggling with getting published, and to see that, you know, failure is an event, not a definition,” Serritella said. “To just keep on moving forward.”The "Have a Nice Guilt Trip" co-authors also together write the “Chick Wit” column in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Serritella writes from her home in New York City, while Scottoline works from her farm just outside of Philadelphia.Scottoline’s farm is home to many animals, and even more books.“I feel so lucky to have a life in books,” she said. “Like sometimes I think I'm like in a book, and I kind of am. It doesn't get better than that.”
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  • Courtesy Apple(NEW YORK) -- Apple announced Tuesday it will give users the option to sign up as organ and tissue donors in the updated Health app being rolled out with iOS 10 this fall.Furthering the company's quest to make the iPhone a valuable tool when it comes to taking charge of one's health, users will be able to sign up with a few taps before their registrations are sent to the National Donate Life Registry.Apple's Medical ID can be accessed from a locked iPhone screen, allowing first responders to gain valuable information about a person in the event of an emergency, including contacts, blood type, medical conditions and allergies.More than 120,000 Americans are on the organ donation wait list, with one person joining the queue every 10 minutes."On average, one person dies every hour in the United States waiting for an organ transplant because the demand for lifesaving transplants far exceeds the available supply of organs -- and one donor can save as many as eight lives," David Fleming, president and CEO of Donate Life America, said in a statement. "By working with Apple to bring the National Donate Life Registry to the Health app on iPhone, we're making it easier for people to find out about organ, eye and tissue donation and quickly register. This is a huge step forward that will ultimately help save lives."Apple's Health app serves as a dashboard where users can get a breakdown of their overall health by using data pulled in from other apps. If you're an iPhone user and haven't already filled out your Medical ID, you can do so by opening the Health app (it's a heart icon) and choosing the "Medical ID" option in the bottom right corner.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CABIN CREEK, Colo.) -- Enjoy solitude? An entire town in Colorado that's 45 minutes from Denver could be yours for $350,000.
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  • Hooters(DENVER) -- Several parents in Denver were outraged after recently discovering photos of their young boys posing next to Hooters girls at a Cub Scout camp.Parents told ABC's Denver affiliate KMGH-TV that they were shocked after seeing the photos on the local Hooters' Facebook page.Though the photos appear to have been taken down, several parents said they were still upset after learning the restaurant had actually sponsored the Cub Scout camp.The Boy Scouts of America Denver Area Council confirmed that Hooters approached the council about working with the scouts and that the restaurant had given a financial contribution to the camp, KMGH-TV reported.A manager at the Hooters in Denver also told KMGH that the restaurant provided three of its employees each day as volunteers for the three-day Cub Scout camp.Michelle Kettleborough, mom to a 7-year-old cub scout who attended the camp, told KMGH said she was in disbelief when she picked up her son and noticed him wearing a Hooters hat."I step back for a second, and I take a look and I'm like, 'Are they wearing Hooters visors? Wait a minute,'" Kettleborough said. "Quite honestly we're questioning whether we're going to keep him in the organization at all next year."Marsha Corn, another concerned parent, told KMGH-TV she thought that the "philosophies" of the Boys Scouts and Hooters were "polar opposites.""We love the Scouts, [but] we think they made a very poor choice," Corn said. "And what I would like -- and what I think would go a long way, again -- is some accountability."Corn said the local Boy Scouts chapter dismissed her concerns when she wrote an email asking about Hooters' sponsorship of the camp.According to the email reply obtained by KMGH-TV, a district executive with the Boy Scouts told Corn, "The restaurant assisted with the costs of putting on the camp, and through their community volunteering several of their waitresses donated their time to help staff the camp. Glad to hear your son had such a good time."A spokesperson for Boy Scouts of America in Denver told KMGH-TV in a statement that a "group of trained volunteers mistakenly wore the wrong attire" to a local Cub Scout Day Camp. The spokesperson added that the issue "was addressed by our Council leadership" and that "[w]e extend our apologies for this mistake and look forward to continuing our mission of serving youth in the Denver area."ABC News' calls to Hooters and the Boy Scouts of America Denver Area Council were not immediately returned.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Christi Shaw was U.S. president of the pharmaceutical giant Novartis when she stunned the business world by walking away from it all.She did it to care for her older sister, Sherry Whitford, who was diagnosed with bone marrow cancer more than two years ago. Whitford was facing a potentially bleak diagnosis but had been admitted into a clinical trial. With the trial located far from her St. Louis home, Whitford would need full-time care. Shaw decided to be there.“I still feel very comfortable as I did the day I made the decision,” Shaw, 49, told ABC News.The middle child of three sisters and married with three children of her own, Shaw said she and Whitford have “been in this journey together” since the diagnosis.The decision she announced publicly in April put Shaw’s nearly 30-year career on pause, but she said leaving her role at the billion-dollar corporation “wasn’t a difficult decision.”She explained that Whitford had taken eight weeks to care for their mother when she had breast cancer.“This decision was a logical step from a family perspective,” Shaw said. “I actually feel very lucky that I’m able to take this time.""Many times we go through life and we just keep doing what we were doing because that’s what we’ve always done,” she said.Shaw recognizes she has resources that many others don’t. Financially she can afford to take time off and has a strong network within the medical community.Shaw and Whitford plan to create a foundation to help families in similar situations who don’t have the financial resources to take time off from work or travel and stay in another city for a clinical trial.Shaw acknowledged that she wasn’t good at “sitting still,” and it has taken some time for her to adjust. She said she constantly checks email while she waits “an hour-and-a-half” for a doctor’s appointment.While her future career track is in question, Shaw said caring for her sister is leaving a lasting impression.Though she had “a great career,” she said, “If I look back, the place I need to be right now is with my sister.”Her sister feels like she hit the family jackpot, too.“I’m just very, very lucky to have you as a sister in my life,” Whitford said to Shaw.“Ditto,” Shaw replied.
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