• hxdlbzky/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW BEDFORD, Mass.) -- Growing up, Joseph Abboud always believed that dressing well, and presenting himself well, would open doors.So much so, that in his high school yearbook, Abboud's peers voted him "Best Dressed."His idea paid off: Abboud became an award-winning U.S. menswear designer and author, opening up his namesake brand and launching his first collection in 1987.From the very beginning, the pieces were made in a factory in New Bedford, Massachusetts, just 30 miles from where he grew up with his parents."We always believed, as an American designer, making it in America was really important for us," he said. "It's important to know that we're a solid piece of Massachusetts."In 2004, Abboud sold the trademark and left his business. He told ABC News he never thought he'd work with his name again. He went on to join Men's Warehouse as its chief creative director in 2012. Little did he know that just a year later, he'd be reunited with the brand he built and with his workers, who were still making suits in New Bedford."When I walked back into that factory for the first time after seven or eight years, it was a pretty emotional moment because all the people came up and embraced me," Abboud told "World News Tonight's" anchor David Muir. "It was like coming home again."These days, 800 workers cut and sew more than 1,000 men's suits every day for the Joseph Abboud brand. He said many workers had been there for 25-30 years."The whole idea is creating the great men's special store again," he said. "We want the best prices we can give our customers, with all our products ... But it really is about the quality first and the experience."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The White House will unveil its much-anticipated blueprint for President Donald Trump’s tax reform plan on Wednesday.Administration officials are calling this a "first draft" -- an outline of priorities and principles. It won't be draft legislation. In the final hours leading up to its release, some key parts were still a work in progress.But with excitement on Wall Street, and the president looking to build momentum ahead of his 100th day, aides are planning a coordinated public relations blitz.There will be a press briefing Wednesday on the proposal and key members of Trump's team, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, will be out talking about it. However, there won't be a formal event with the president himself; Trump is expected to do a few media interviews and address it during his rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday.So what's in it?The plan mirrors his tax proposal from the campaign. Among the things Trump will call for:
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  • Nordstrom.com(NEW YORK) -- The fashion industry's "war on work" has hit a nerve with TV host Mike Rowe of the Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs.What's elicited such a strong reaction from the alpha male? A $425 pair of men's heavily-distressed, straight-leg blue denim jeans sold at Nordstrom, which, according to the retailer's website, has "seen some hard-working action with a crackled, caked-on muddy coating that shows you're not afraid to get down and dirty."But not being afraid to get down and dirty, and actually getting down and dirty are two vastly different things. After all, Rowe is the real deal, which is why he takes issue with the jeans's concept. On his show, he performs difficult, disgusting and downright dirty occupational duties alongside the regular folks who hold such jobs. He's actually "seen some hard-working action."Of the "Barracuda Straight Leg Jeans," Rowe writes in a lengthy 507-word Facebook post, "I offer further proof that our country's war on work continues to rage in all corners of polite society. Behold the latest assault from Nordstrom's ... Finally - a pair of jeans that look like they have been worn by someone with a dirty job…made for people who don't."Rowe has harsh words for those who buy the jeans, writing the faux mud is "something to foster the illusion of work. The illusion of effort. Or perhaps, for those who actually buy them, the illusion of sanity."He continues, the jeans are "a costume for wealthy people who see work as ironic -- not iconic."ABC News has reached out to Nordstrom for comment.
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  • Chobani(NEW YORK) -- The Chobani yogurt company is suing far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones for alleged defamation, after the shock jock published what the company says are false and defamatory stories.At issue in the suit filed Monday is a video published on Jones’ InfoWars website and social media accounts earlier this month in which two InfoWars staffers discuss the publicity that Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya received for hiring refugees at his plant in Twin Falls, Idaho, and the separate case of three refugee youth who pleaded guilty in the assault of a 5-year-old girl in the same city.The youth, who had no connection to the plant, were reportedly ages 7 to 14 and were involved in inappropriately touching the girl while filming the incident.“In the video, Mr. Knight republishes the false statement that the Chobani plant brought crime and tuberculosis to the community,” the suit said.The assault was "unrelated to Chobani," it said.The video was promoted on the @PlanetPrisonTV Twitter account under the headline: “Idaho Yogurt Maker Caught Importing Migrant Rapists.” The assertion made in the headline was not made in the video.The lawsuit alleges that the Twitter account is controlled by InfoWars and that the video was retweeted by Jones himself.Jones and InfoWars “declined to remove the defamatory statements or publish a retraction,” the suit says. “Defendants promoted the video with the defamatory headline ‘Idaho Yogurt Maker Caught Importing Migrant Rapists’ despite knowing that the statement was false or while clearly doubting the truth of the statement.”In the video, the two staffers refer to the assault case -- in which three refugee youths pleaded guilty -- as “the Idaho rape case.”But “police and prosecutors said there was no rape,” according to the Twin Falls Times-News. Instead, the unnamed boys pleaded guilty in the assault.Chobani is seeking punitive damages worth at least $10,000.Responding to the suit, Jones appeared in a video posted to the InfoWars website on Tuesday, in which he blamed billionaire George Soros, saying “he had his Islamicist-owned and backed U.S. company openly file suit against InfoWars Tuesday for stating information that is part of the public record.”“I’m not saying he [Ulukaya] consciously brought in people he thought were going to rape, but people he brought in and force-fed on America have now been implicated, indicted, and now have pled guilty to that,” Jones also said.An email ABC News sent to Soros’ foundation seeking comment was not immediately returned. He is not mentioned in the suit and there’s no suggestion that he has any connection.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The major indexes closed higher Tuesday, and the tech-heavy Nasdaq reached a new milestone, ahead of President Trump's announcement on tax reform.The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 232.23 (+1.12 percent) to finish at 20,996.12.The Nasdaq jumped 41.67 (+0.70 percent) to close at 6,025.49, hitting above 6,000 for the first time. The S&P 500 finished at 2,388.61, up 14.46 (+0.61 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were about 1 percent higher at under $50 a barrel.Tax Reform: On Wednesday, investors will pay close attention when President Trump announces a tax reform proposal ahead of his 100th day in office. Under the new tax plan, the president has said individuals and businesses will receive large tax cuts.Winners and Losers: Shares of Netflix, Inc. soared 6 percent after the streaming service landed a Chinese licensing deal.Health insurance company Anthem Inc. will likely not renew its contract with Express Scripts, sending the pharmacy benefit management organization's stock to tumble 11 percent.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The final weekend of April and first few weekends of May mark the dates many college graduation ceremonies take place across the country.As students leave their institutions and embark on their careers, they often leave school with more questions than answers.Mark Beal, a public relations veteran and adjunct professor of PR and marketing at Rutgers University, answered some common questions his students have asked him in an exclusive interview with ABC News. He discusses some of the common mistakes post-graduates make, and offers some advice on how soon-to-be graduates should begin their careers.He recently published a guidebook, 101 Lessons They Never Taught You In College: The Essential Guide for Students and Recent Graduates to Launch Their Careers, offering advice on building a successful career. Without revealing all the details in his book, he shared a few lessons and broke down some key things seniors should consider as graduation approaches.1. "Experience Counts"Lesson 35 in Beal's book: there is no learning experience like actual work experience according to Beal. Even if it is not your dream job, Beal advises graduates to immerse themselves in their work no matter where they end up because when they go for another job, the first question they will receive is, "What sort of experience do you have?”This lesson applies to undergraduates as well. Beal advises students to for work experience after their freshman year to learn about an industry they may want to one day pursue.2. "Be Confident, Not Cocky"Beal wants students to consider their body language when they finally land that interview. Nerves are normal, but he advises projecting confidence.Some tips: shake the interviewer's hand firmly, look them in the eyes, and thank them afterwards for their time.He says doing just the opposite--a soft hand shake or looking at the ground while speaking--could cause a hiring manager to immediately consider other candidates.3. Set your own curriculumBeal calls it "being a student for life." On the verge of graduation, students have the opportunity to create their own curriculums. They can choose what newspapers to read, podcasts they prefer to listen to, and when they land a job, can choose how they immerse themselves in that industry.Whatever path they choose, Beal wants soon-to-be graduates to constantly challenge themselves to learn. He feels it helps them get closer to a career that aligns with their interests.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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