• Photo by Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- An eighth child has been killed by an IKEA dresser that was recalled more than a year ago because of its propensity to tip over.Two-year-old Jozef Dudek of California was killed when a three-drawer IKEA dresser tipped over and crushed him during naptime.The family’s lawyer, Daniel J. Mann of Philadelphia, said the accident happened in May and no one else was in the room.“It fell over on top of him,” Mann said. “It didn’t contact any furniture.”Mann said the family is “absolutely distraught” over what happened.Child safety advocates say the death, which came to light this week, is the eighth reported child death involving an IKEA dresser or chest involved the June 2016 recall.The items are unstable if not properly anchored to the wall, posing a serious tip-over and entrapment hazard that can result in death or serious injuries to children.IKEA is offering a refund or a wall anchoring kit for consumers.In a written statement to ABC News, IKEA said, “Our hearts go out to the affected family, and we offer our sincere condolences during this most difficult time.” The company added that “the initial investigation indicates that the chest involved in this incident had not been properly attached to the wall.”The 29 million recalled chests and dressers include various MALM three-, four-, five- and six-drawer models, as well as other chests and dressers that were sold by IKEA.Nancy Cowles, executive director of the non-profit Kids In Danger, says IKEA isn’t doing enough to reach parents who have one of these dressers. Cowles said a relatively small percentage of affected pieces have been remedied by a refund or repair kit – perhaps as low as three percent – citing recall progress data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission from January 2017 obtained by The Philadelphia Inquirer.That means potentially millions of dressers are still in use and unsecured to a wall, Cowles said.“We have to do better, because these are just ticking land mines in a child’s bedroom,” she said.IKEA spokeswoman Mona Astra Liss did not address the accuracy of the three percent figure but the company statement noted that the recall goes back many years and it’s impossible to know how many units are still in use.In addition to the California family, Mann’s law firm has represented the families of three other toddler boys who were killed when their IKEA MALM dressers tipped over onto them.After the first two deaths in 2014, the company issued a notice offering free anchoring kits; after the third toddler, a 22-month-old boy from Minnesota, was killed in Feburary 2016 – the third death in two years – the company issued a full recall.After that recall was issued in June 2016, a fourth death that had occurred in 2011 from the MALM line of IKEA furniture was discovered and added to the count. The recall also notes three earlier deaths from different models of IKEA dressers in 1989, 2002 and 2007.Mann says the design was inherently dangerous and charged that the company still hasn’t done enough to warn consumers who may have one at home. IKEA has since redesigned some of its dressers and says all dressers it sells now adhere to the voluntary industry standard for stability.“The true tragedy is there might be more of these in the future," Mann said.In numerous other IKEA tip-over cases a child was injured but not killed, and Mann said he’s sure there are tip-overs that are never reported at all because a child was not harmed.“Sometimes a parent catches it, or it falls onto a wall or a bed,” he said. “It’s just by the grace of God.”The American Academy of Pediatrics, Consumers Union, Consumer Federation of America, Kids In Danger, the National Center for Health Research, Public Citizen, Shane's Foundation and U.S. PIRG issued
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  • JaysonPhotography/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A mixed day on Wall Street as investors remember a bleak anniversary.The Dow Jones Industrial Average rallied from down more than 100 points to close the day at 23,163.04, a new record high. That marked a 5.44 point gain on the day for the Dow.The Nasdaq fell 19.15 to finish the session at 6,605.07, while the S&P 500 edged slightly upwards, closing 0.84 higher at 2,562.10.Thursday marked the thirtieth anniversary of Black Monday, the largest crash in the history of the Dow.The National Retail Federation is expecting a record amount of spending this Halloween. According to data from the agency, Americans could spend $9.1 billion on costumes and candy this month.Blue Apron is cutting jobs both at its headquarters and at warehouses around the country. The meal prep kit company was a hotly anticipated IPO this year, but faces competition from other companies, including Amazon. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Amazon(NEW YORK) -- When Amazon announced its plan to accept bids from cities for the location of its second headquarters, various U.S. cities developed elaborate plans to catch the attention of the e-commerce giant.On Sept. 7 Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos first laid out the terms of the project called HQ2. On Thursday, the window for cities to submit those bids closed. Bezos has promised that 50,000 people will be hired to work at the new headquarters.Amazon will announce the location of its second headquarters sometime next year. More than 100 cities submitted bids.Amazon said it wanted a metropolitan location that had at least one million residents. Some cities put together buzz-worthy gimmicks to convince Bezos that their location would be the right choice.Here are some of the cities that went all out in their bids:Tuscon, Arizona Sun Corridor Inc., an economic development group, sent a 21-foot Saguaro cactus to Bezos as an Amazon headquarters welcome gift. Amazon refused the plant and instead donated it to a local museum, according to Laura Shaw, chief marketing officer of Sun Corridor Inc.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LONG BEACH, Calif.) -- After a Yelp reviewer slammed a southern California restaurant for its use of food from a popular fast food chain, the owner embraced the criticism and hailed the pre-made product.Kimberly Sanchez, the owner of Sweet Dixie Kitchen in Long Beach, California, defended her choice, saying she proudly serves fried chicken from Popeye's for the restaurant's chicken and waffles brunch dish.Yelp user Tyler H said he inquired about the dish after seeing a waiter bring "two large boxes of Popeye's to the kitchen.""I wanted to believe that this was just a snack for the workers, but alas it was not. I ordered the chicken and waffles to see whether or not they were serving Popeye's to their customers. I thought the chicken tasted suspiciously like Popeye's," Tyler wrote in the review.He went on, "I kindly asked our waiter how they cooked their fried chicken. After checking, he admitted that they do in fact use Popeye's."Tyler H added that his meal was comped by the restaurant.Sanchez responded to the criticism in her own Yelp post."I am owning this," Sanchez told ABC News' Nick Watt in an interview that aired on "GMA." "I love their chicken. It's the best I've ever had."Sanchez told ABC News Los Angeles station KABC that she previously reached out to Popeye's for approval but has not heard back.As for the allegation that she tried to trick customers with the fried chicken, Sanchez said, "Honey, I carried it through the front door."Customers DeSean Bailey and Stephanie Stephens don't seem to mind. They told ABC News they love the chicken and waffles dish.Popeye's did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- While many deal with a breakup by eating large amounts of ice cream, those with some extra cash to spend may opt to visit a post-breakup retreat to find healing after a romance ends.Amy Chan, a relationship columnist, founded the Renew Breakup Bootcamp in upstate New York following her own difficult breakup. She now holds weekend-long retreats that can cost upwards of $1,700, but promises healing for the heartbroken."Five years ago ... I was dating someone that I thought was going to marry," Chan told ABC News. "When that relationship fell apart abruptly, I completely fell apart.""I tried everything to get better," she added. "I realized that there needs to be something to help people who are going through this very pivotal stage in their life."The program aims to help those suffering from a breakup to move on, and includes sessions lead by a neuroscientist, a psychologist, a life coach and various other activities that are supposed to equip attendees to "detach from the past," according to the camp's website.One attendee, Puneet Grewal, 36, from Vancouver, Canada, told ABC News that she was in an on-and-off relationship for seven years before winding up at the Renew Breakup Bootcamp.Even five years after the breakup, Grewal said she is still reeling, and has not found a way to move on."I find myself still having, you know, painful moments that I wish that I could deal with better," Grewal said. "And I haven't found love."Grewal signed up for the "Intense Love Life Reboot," which takes place at a farm in upstate New York. Attendees are asked to disconnect from their digital devices and take part in therapy, yoga and meditation sessions. The camp even features alpaca petting.The three-day experience was eye-opening, according to Grewal. She said she was left filled with a renewed hope. Grewal added that she is learning to let go of her fear, and even open up her heart up to romance again."I think I'm definitely open and ready to find love again," Grewal said. "I have that confidence. So I'm definitely going to pick a different type of love and the love that I deserve."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Photo by Dave Rowland/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Burger King released a three-minute video on Tuesday that highlights the prevalence of bullying in society.The video, filmed at a California location of the fast food chain by hidden camera, shows the results of a social experiment in which a high school junior is bullied in full view of patrons. The ad is timed to come out during National Bullying Prevention Month. In contrast to the bullying of the teen, Burger King employees are seen "bullying" the brand's Whopper Jr. The video shows what happens, as some patrons are more likely to speak up about a damaged sandwich than the bullying happening in front of them.Some customers, however, do speak up and offer heartwarming and inspirational messages in the fight against bullying.The company cites nonprofit organization No Bully, which says that 30 percent of school kids worldwide are bullied each year. At the end of the video, Burger King urges viewers to "visit NoBully.org to learn how you can take a stand against bullying."
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