• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Monday is predicted to be one of the busiest travel days of 2017 as millions of people flock to the 14 states across the United States in the path of the total solar eclipse.In South Carolina, the last state on the eclipse's path, hotel occupancy along the path could be doubled compared to what South Carolina normally sees in the third week in August, according to the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.The University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, pushed its student “move-in day” back one day from Aug. 21 due to traffic and lodging concerns associated with the eclipse.The Hilton and Marriott hotels along the eclipse’s prime viewing area, known as the path of totality, are nearly full, the companies told ABC News.The total eclipse, the brief phase of the celestial event when the moon completely blocks out the sun, will be best seen in certain cities, including Salem, Oregon, Jackson, Wyoming, and Charleston, South Carolina.Hotel rooms still available in the prime viewing areas may be pricey but there are still opportunities to save money, experts say.“There are still deals to be found, even in the path of totality,” Mark Ellwood, contributing editor for Conde Nast Traveler, told ABC News. “You just have to be a little clever how you look for them.”Hipcamp, an online travel service for camping experiences, lists more than 1,000 eclipse-friendly campsites.Bivouac Campground in Oregon’s Smith Rock State Park still has room for eclipse viewers to pitch a tent for as little as $5 per person.Airbnb, the online lodging marketplace, reports it still has more than 29,000 rentals available across the eclipse’s path.“It's Airbnb's magic moment,” Conde Nast’s Ellwood said. “There are plenty of families who live within the path of totality who have realized that the spare room can make them a little bit of money, so check Airbnb's site and look for the key word eclipse.”He added, “You'll be surprised what you might find.”For flights, Ellwood suggests flying into Denver, a major transportation hub that may be cheaper than flying into cities like Casper, Wyoming, that are directly on the eclipse’s path.“It’s not in the path of totality but its close enough you can drive from there,” Ellwood said of Denver International Airport, which plans to hand out moon pies and eclipse glasses Monday.As with any major commercial event, experts also say, watch out for scams.“Perhaps some unscrupulous hotels will cancel early reservations and turn around and charge more for those rooms,” said Emma Fletcher, director of scam and fraud initiatives for the BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust. “And, of course, there are risks no matter what but you want to minimize those risks.”The trade group that represents hotel owners, the American Hotel and Lodging Association, encourages consumers to book directly with hotels to get the best deal.“We encourage guests to book directly with the hotel to help ensure they get what they want and need from their reservation while often offering the better value,” the association said in a statement.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • BananaStock/iStock/Thinkstock(MILWAUKEE) -- A Milwaukee, Wisconsin, man decided to sell his extensive Nintendo video game collection online, and he reportedly made quite a hefty sum.Charles Amble has loved video-gaming since he was a kid."It's kind of a nerdy hobby that a lot of people who are my age, you know, that grew up in the late '80s, early '90s can appreciate," Amble told ABC affiliate WISN.He told WISN he started amassing the video game-related gear when he was young, but about a decade ago, he really upped his gathering."Most of my collection came from, like, garage sales and Goodwill finds, auctions, stuff like that," Amble told WISN.Amble decided to sell the items now because, he said, the hobby of video-gaming has started booming again in the past few years.He posted the assortment of video games on eBay, asking $29,900 for the lot.Amble said he received a few serious bids, but he decided to go with a cash offer of $20,000 by a man in Ohio. The buyer drove up and picked up the impressive collection.Amble's home is now lined with empty bookshelves instead of droves of video games, figurines and paraphernalia."You know, man, it's super sad, like, the past 10 years, this has really been a huge part of my life," Amble told WISN.According to Amble, he sold 750 games across three Nintendo platforms. He told WISN he plans to use the money to travel with his wife and possibly buy a boat.
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  • Creatas/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Health insurance premiums could rise by roughly 20 percent next year for some consumers if President Donald Trump decides to end key Obamacare subsidy payments to insurers, according to a new analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- After four members of his American Manufacturing Council resigned earlier this week, President Donald Trump explained away the actions as ones made out of "embarrassment" over the issue of outsourcing."Some of the folks that will leave, they're leaving out of embarrassment because they make their products outside [of the United States,]" Trump said Tuesday as he fielded questions following scheduled remarks on his infrastructure plans.This week, the CEOs of Merck, Intel, Under Armour and the president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing all announced their departures from the advisory panel in the wake of Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, Saturday.Two more leaders, Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO labor union, and Thea Lee, the AFL-CIO's former deputy chief of staff, announced their resignations following Trump's comments, which assigned "blame" to protesters on "both sides" last weekend.Trump said that he had been "lecturing" business leaders about returning manufacturing to the U.S."You have to bring this work back to this country," said Trump Tuesday. "That's what I want. I want manufacturing to be back into the United States so that American workers can benefit."The president has himself admitted to producing Trump-branded products internationally on various occasions after it became a critique of his rivals during last year's presidential election. As recently as mid-July, during the White House's self-proclaimed "Made in America" week, then-press secretary Sean Spicer explained Trump's rationale for allowing such items to be manufactured overseas."I can tell you that in some cases, there are certain supply chains or scalability that may not be available in this country," said Spicer on July 17.Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier announced Monday that he was resigning from the president's council, saying in statement that as a "matter of personal conscience, I feel a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism.""America's leaders must honor our fundamental values by clearly rejecting expressions of hatred, bigotry and group supremacy, which run counter to the American ideal that all people are created equal," he said.The president responded first on Twitter, slamming Frazier's decision.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street was little changed on Tuesday despite strong U.S. retail sales data.The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 5.28 (+0.02 percent) to finish at 21,998.99.The Nasdaq slid 7.22 (-0.11 percent) to close at 6,333.01, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,464.61, down 1.23 (-0.05 percent) from its open.Crude oil was up 0.55 percent higher with prices under $48 per barrel.Retail Sales: Retail sales in July were above analysts' expectations, rising 0.6 percent, with a boost in automobile purchases and raised discretionary spending.Winners and Losers:  Deutsche Bank upgraded Wynn Resorts Ltd.'s stock to "Buy" and shares of the hotel operated soared 6.41 percent.Shares of Home Depot Inc. sunk 2.65 percent, despite higher-than-expected quarterly sales in its earnings report.
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  • Brant Pinvidic(SANTA CLARA, Calif.) -- Albert the turkey could have been someone's Thanksgiving dinner, but instead he's an internet sensation."We had no idea Albert would be how he is," Brant Pinvidic, Albert's owner, told ABC News.The turkey, he said, was rescued as a "symbolic gesture" from a slaughterhouse on Thanksgiving 2016."My contractor knew a farm where they raise turkeys for slaughter and he asked if I wanted one for Thanksgiving," Pinvidic said.Now, less than a year later, Albert is a full member of Pinvidic's household in Santa Clara, California.He's even been a "best man" at a wedding.He hangs by the family pool."Albert is part of our everyday life," Pinvidic said. "I see him every morning and evening. He will follow us everywhere almost all day. He simply wants attention and to cuddle. He’s very much like our dogs."And, somewhat ironically, Albert seems perfectly comfortable at the kitchen counter.But he's most famous for giving hugs."He’s a complete showoff," Pinvidic said. "He only wants attention. He doesn’t want food, he doesn’t want to play, he just wants you to notice him. He’s very pompous. He really believes he is the most interesting thing going on wherever he is."The turkey, who has 9,000 Instagram followers, has inspired his own animal rescue foundation, Albert and Friends. The organization was formed after Albert's rescue and primarily works with St. Bonnie's shelter, which takes in cats, dogs and horses, among other animals."His fans get a lot of joy from his posts and his interaction and that makes us very happy. We hope to expose more people to the joy of rescue animals," Pinvidic said.
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