• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --   Digital assistants are making life more hands-free -- and, possibly, easier. But can you be hands-off when it comes to talking about “the birds and the bees”?
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  • Copyright: The Walt Disney Company(ORLANDO) -- Meet Jeda and Anala, the two tiger cubs recently born at Disney's Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, who made their television debut on Good Morning America on Wednesday.The endangered Sumatran tiger cubs, born this August, are the first tigers ever born at Animal Kingdom."The cubs wrestle with each other constantly and love jumping on plants and logs,” Erin Heavey, an animal care specialist at Animal Kingdom, said in a statement.She added that the pair have already begun exhibiting their distinct personalities. The name of the male cub, Jeda, means "pause" in Malay, while the female cub's name, Anala, means "fiery" or "sizzling" in Hindi."Jeda, in particular, loves ripping the bark off the logs and playing with all the pieces that come off," Heavey said. "Anala is becoming more adept at sneaking and pouncing and loves hiding behind things."Heavey said Anela loves trying to "surprise attack" her brother or her mother, Sohni.Sohni has been bonding well with the cubs, and feeds and grooms them throughout the day, according to a statement posted on Disney World's website.The cubs were bred through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan conservation program, which aims to promote responsible breeding for endangered or threatened species.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK)  --  A new study of online “tech support” scams shows that millennial’s – not the elderly – may be hardest hit by the widespread frauds, and their victimization may extend far beyond the initial loss of money.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Todd Carmichael is one of the few chief executives in America to publicly condemn Republicans’ plans to slash the corporate tax rate and rewrite the tax code.Why bash a plan that would be a boon for his shareholders? Carmichael says he’s willing to declare what other executives won’t: the bill may be good for his business, but it’s bad for the country.Carmichael said he defines his own success by doing right by the people around him. His primary responsibilities as the Chief Executive Officer of La Colombe Coffee Roasters are to scale up his company and make money for his shareholders; he wants to redefine how Americans drink their coffee. He said it wasn’t in his plans to be a voice for political change."When events started unfolding the way they did," he said, he realized, "I’m going to have to come out of the boardroom and I’m going to have to use my voice."Carmichael’s biggest concern over the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” is that it’s giving a large tax break to corporations at a time when they don’t necessarily need it. Drawing on comparisons from the way his grandparents stockpiled goods during The Great Depression, he explains why he believes giving a tax break to corporations now is bad."A stimulus package is like a bunker," he said. "It's the soups and crackers and all those things that are in your basement in case something goes wrong. The fact that we're eating that for dinner is dangerous. Because in years we might need it. And it won't be there."Though he recognizes that it’s his responsibility as a CEO to take any gains from the tax cut and pass them onto his shareholders, Carmichael strongly disagrees with the idea that those gains for investors will eventually trickle down to the American people. He said other CEOs he knows agree."CEOs are looking each other and going, ‘What's happening? We didn't ask for this and we know it won't work,'" he said. "And we don't have a choice ultimately either, our shareholders want that money."It's the long-term effects that concern him most, Carmichael said."We realize this is going to damage the economy over time, and it puts us in a very difficult situation," he added.Carmichael said he didn’t ask for permission from his shareholders to speak out, and that his plan is to "just keep going until someone says something."He felt compelled to speak out, he said, to help those who want change.“I've seen this unraveling of a country that I didn't think I lived in," Carmichael said. "I didn't think that this country just favored the rich, and just favored the affluent, or favored the white, or favored the straight. I don't want to live in a country like that. So it's up to me to either move or change it. And I'm not going to move. So I'm going to do what I can to change it." Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A New York Girl Scout is giving hundreds of kids the chance to play with a childhood staple, the American Girl doll, by creating a lending program for the dolls at local libraries.Olivia Reduto, 14, of Edgemont, New York, spent the past year raising nearly $800 so she could purchase six American Girl dolls and accessories for the dolls.Olivia, a ninth-grader who has been in the Girl Scouts since the first-grade, then donated two dolls each to three libraries within the Yonkers Public Library system just north of New York City.The dolls, which can be checked out for a three-week period, already have a waiting list after being introduced this fall.“It’s been overwhelming,” Tara Somersall, head of children’s services at Riverfront Library in Yonkers, said of the response. “One girl who checked a doll out from us last week, she left here skipping.”Somersall added of the appeal, “Because American Girl dolls come in different ethnicities, looking at these dolls, a lot of little girls can relate to them.”Olivia studied the demographics of each individual library in order to make sure each American Girl doll she donated was a doll the library’s patrons could identify with. American Girl dolls come with their books to explain their life story and represent a variety of backgrounds and historical eras.“I have three main points of my project,” said Olivia, who earned a Girl Scouts’ Silver Award for the project. “One is diversity, one is to get kids excited about history and reading and one is about income inequality.”She continued, “So I chose different types of dolls from different cultures and ones that had a certain history and certain years and worked with the library to pick them out.”Olivia was inspired after reading an article about the Ottendorfer branch of the New York Public Library, which has been lending American Girl dolls for several years.She held tea parties for younger Girl Scouts and worked at a Girl Scouts tag sale to raise money. Most American Girl dolls sell for more than $100, with accessories costing even more.After Olivia had enough money raised to purchase the dolls, she went on a shopping spree at the American Girl flagship store in New York City. Olivia's mom, Tina Reduto, also won a raffle through the store for a free American Girl doll that they are donating to a fourth local library.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you love Girl Scout Cookies, but can't stand buying them from pushy co-workers with daughters, or maybe you want an ostensibly healthier alternative, Yoplait has you covered.The yogurt company is releasing a trio of new flavors, based on the Girl Scouts' most popular cookies: Thin Mints, Samoas, and Tagalongs.These flavors will be reflected in Yoplait Whips! Girl Scouts Thin Mints, Yoplait Original Girl Scouts Caramel Coconut, and Yoplait Whips! Girl Scouts Peanut Butter Chocolate."Beyond the delicious flavor, the yogurts will also remind consumers everywhere of the power of Girl Scout Cookies," said Barry Horowitz, Girls Scouts USA's chief revenue officer in a statement.We're guessing it'll be awhile before we see yogurt-flavored Girl Scout cookies.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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