• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed slightly lower ahead of the Fed's two-day policy meeting this week.The Dow gave up 3.63 (-0.02 percent) to finish at 18,120.17.The Nasdaq lost 9.54 (-0.18 percent) to close at 5,235.03, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,139.12, down 0.04 (-0.00 percent) from its open.Crude oil climbed less than 1 percent with prices hitting under $44 a barrel.
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  • Twitter(NEW YORK) -- Twitter users: You're still bound by the 140-character rule. However, what counts toward that 140-character cap is changing.As of Monday, sharing photos, videos, animated GIFs, polls and quoted tweets no longer count toward the 140-character limit.Twitter announced the changes back in May, along with a number of other changes.The other changes, including the way that reply tweets are handled, do not appear to have taken effect yet.
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  • Chancellors(BRACKNELL, England) -- Harry Potter's childhood home is up for sale.The three-bedroom property, located in Bracknell, Berkshire, served as the home where the boy wizard grew up with the Dursleys. It has been listed by U.K.-based Chancellors Realty, and features a breakfast room, family bathroom, cloakroom and rear garden with large patio.Priced at 475,000 British pounds (or $619,485.50 U.S. dollars), the fictional 4 Privet Drive sits in a quiet cul-de-sac 40 miles outside of London.The actual address is 12 Picket Post Close and the interior of the home was featured in the franchise's first installment, "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone." Exterior shots were used in all of the films, according to a representative working with Chancellors.Additional amenities include a master bed and bath, new driveway and a living room with a door to the garden.See the full listing here.
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  • Zillow(DALLAS) -- One swell, 1950s-style pad for sale in Texas is something straight out of Mad Men.Listed at $665,000, the home sits in a desirable area located at 11016 Pinocchio Drive in Dallas.The T-shaped dwelling boasts vaulted ceilings, fireplace, a Nelson bubble lamp, three-and-a-half baths, four bedrooms and an in-ground pool.The nostalgic kitchen features original cabinetry, vintage pink appliances and Formica counters, according to Zillow.Ed Murchison, a realtor of Virginia Cook Realtors, specializing in mid-century modern housing, told ABC News that the current owner has been living in the home for 22 years and has not changed its layout since it was built in 1954."This home is probably one of the most iconic mid-century modern houses in Dallas," Murchison said. "It's retained so much of its 1954 originality, which for so many of the mid-century style homes, have been stripped out over time."He added: "It really embodies that concept of indoor-outdoor space. Every major area of the house opens to an outdoor living space -- either to the pool, or a little private garden."Murchison said the house once stood as a model home of the 1954 Parade of Homes tour. The furniture is not include in the asking price.You can see the original listing on Zillow here.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MALIBU, Calif.) -- It looks like Leonardo DiCaprio is saying bye bye to Malibu.The Oscar winner is selling his beachfront property in the California coastal town for $10.95 million, according to online real estate website Trulia.If DiCaprio, 41, does sell his home at full price he'd make a major profit. The actor purchased the property back in 1998 for only $1.6 million.The modern 1,765-square-foot home features three bedrooms and two bathrooms along with views of the Pacific Ocean literally from the front door.The kitchen, with plenty of storage and stainless steel appliances, opens right up to the dining area that features another view.A fireplace makes this home cozy, not to mention the hot tub on the private patio with plenty of outdoor space for entertaining.
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  • Courtesy Keith Pierro/Gold & Gold, P.A.(PALM BEACH, Fla.) -- A Florida man has filed what is believed to be the first lawsuit to result from a battery defect affecting Samsung Note7 smartphones.Jonathan Strobel, a resident of Palm Beach County, Florida, alleges in the suit that the phone was in his right pocket on September 9 when it exploded, causing "severe burns" to his leg, leaving him "in shock and extreme pain due to his injuries."A Samsung spokesperson told ABC News that the company is aware of the incident, but that it doesn't "comment on pending litigation."Among other allegations, the suit alleges that the Note7 smartphone "was not reasonably fit, suitable, or safe to the ultimate operators or consumers for its intended or reasonably foreseeable purposes when manufactured," and that Samsung, "knew or in the exercise of due care should have known that the Galaxy Note7 cell phone...would create a foreseeable risk of harm to users."The suit seeks damages in excess of $15,000.On Thursday, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced a government-sanctioned recall of the Note7, after multiple reports that the battery defect had caused several of the smartphones to explode and in some cases spark fires."Samsung has received 92 reports of the batteries overheating in the U.S., including 26 reports of burns and 55 reports of property damage, including fires in cars and a garage," according to the CPSC.Nearly a million Note7 smartphones were sold in the United States, according to the CPSC. The recall applies only to those Samsung Galaxy Note7 devices sold before Sept. 15, 2016.The agency estimates that 97 percent of those contained the defective battery.Consumers are being told to immediately discontinue using the devices and return them to their place of purchase. They will receive their choice of a refund, a new Galaxy Note7 with a different battery or another replacement device of a different model.The company has said it expects replacement Note7 smartphones with defect-free batteries to be available to be available to consumers no later than Wednesday.The company is directing owners of affected Note7 smartphones to visit this website to learn more about their options."With battery cell defects in some of our Note7 phones, we did not meet the standard of excellence that you expect and deserve," Samsung Electronics America President and COO Tim Baxter said in a video statement after the government-sanctioned recall was announced. "We apologize, especially to those of you who were personally affected by this."The Samsung boss said that approximately 130,000 Note7s had already been exchanged in the U.S.The official recall followed almost two weeks of confusion for consumers, that began when Samsung attempted to establish its own informal recall on September 2nd that the company dubbed a "product exchange program," wherein the company promised to replace consumer's defective devices the following week.A week after that the company acknowledged that it was seeking an official government-sanctioned recall through the CPSC. It was finally announced almost a week later on Thursday.
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