• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The biggest names in the auto industry have descended upon New York City's Javits Center, offering consumers a closer look at the latest cars and trucks headed to dealer showrooms in the coming weeks and months.SUVs and CUVs, or "crossovers," continue to dominate these shows, with mainstream and luxury automakers competing in what is quickly becoming a saturated market. Cadillac unveiled its XT4, a compact SUV that the luxury brand from General Motors hopes will jump-start sales. Toyota's Lexus introduced the UX, a subcompact crossover that was designed to appeal to younger buyers. More SUV and CUV offerings include Maserati's Levante Trofeo, the Hyundai Santa Fe, Jaguar's high-performance F-PACE SVR and the Toyota RAV4."This is an SUV market now. Everyone is trying to find their own niche," Jessica Caldwell, executive director of industry analysis at Edmunds, told ABC News. "Automakers are trying to find a unique selling point that resonates with consumers."German automakers are leading the pack while U.S. carmakers are playing catch-up, according to Dan Pund, deputy editor at Car and Driver magazine."You cannot have enough SUVs," Pund said. "Ironically, the SUV is generally considered a construct of the American car market, and yet the American carmakers, particularly on the luxury side, have been lagging the Germans of all people, who were very resistant to the idea 15, 20 years ago."The 2009 recession and poor product planning by American auto executives are partly to blame for their current predicament, he noted. Ford and Chevy have gained a loyal following in the all-so-important SUV segment -- the best-selling SUV in 2017 was the Ford Explorer -- but Cadillac, for example, decided to focus on image more than its product lineup."Cadillac can’t sell their sedans -- which are great -- but they don’t sell well and they’ve been really short on SUVs. Cadillac decided they needed to change their image to go after BMW with a dynamically superior product, which they have done a brilliant job of, but no one wants to buy them. They have spent a lot time and energy on those sedans and coupes, and not on SUVs -- and it shows," he said.According to PwC's Brandon Mason, CUVs are bigger sellers than SUVs in the U.S. Almost 6 million CUVs were sold last year versus about 1.4 million SUVs. There are more CUV nameplates on the market, and consumers tend to choose them over their brawnier brethren because they offer better fuel economy, are more affordable and drive more like a car, he said."Since the end of February, 68 percent of sales have been light trucks. That's a record," he said. "This is a trend that will not change for the foreseeable future. But at some point, with interest rates increasing, there will be a trickle-down effect to auto loans. Have consumers hit a wall? That may not even stop the sale of crossovers."Consumers who are expecting to be blown away by futuristic, outlandish concept vehicles at the show will be disappointed."Auto manufacturers just don't have the money" to produce these anymore, said Kelley Blue Book's Rebecca Lindland. "The extreme concepts are not there. Carmakers would rather spend their money on building a car that's going to come out.""For the most part, what you see is basically production-ready vehicles with very big wheels and tires," she said. "This year, a classic example of that is the Lincoln Aviator. The paint won’t look that good, the wheels won’t be quite that big -- but that’s the car. So we have lost some of that excitement."There are two concepts, though, that impressed auto journalists at the media preview days: the Genesis Essentia electric coupe and the Volkswagen Atlas Tanoak pickup truck.Even with the heavy emphasis on SUVs and CUVs, automakers made a concerted effort to show off their electric models. Jaguar's I-PACE, an all-electric SUV that has its sights on Tesla's Model X, made its presence known at the show."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MENLO PARK, Calif.) -- You can now easily download all of the data Facebook has stored about your profile in one simple step - and the information you’ll find might astound you. Facebook announced Wednesday that it would be overhauling its privacy settings in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal that left many fearful that their personal data had been compromised and launched a trending movement of users who vowed to delete Facebook.But according to a cybersecurity expert, just because a user deletes their Facebook account doesn’t mean their personal data is going to permanently erased from the web. By the time a user gets around to deleting information, it’s likely already been stored in other places within the social media site they post to, in the cloud, or been picked up by an internet bot.“That information is never really deleted,” said Tyler Cohen, a former DIA senior intelligence officer. “You can’t delete it. Once the cat’s out of the bag, which it is, there’s no way it’s going back in.”Facebook doubled down on its promises to up security measures Wednesday by launching new privacy features, including one that compiles all of a user's data into a single location. Much of this data was already available to users on Facebook, but now the company says finding, and in some cases deleting, data is easier than ever. In most cases, users gave permission to Facebook and other social platforms to collect the data now available for them to download.“Essentially you are signing a contract and often times they’re going to tell you what they’ll have access to,” Cohen said. “Sometimes it easy to understand and sometimes it's in language that normal people who aren’t lawyers don’t understand.”That means users are often giving companies and third-party applications permission to access their photos, microphone, and geolocation. Cohen said.Users who want to download their data can do so by logging onto their Facebook page, clicking the settings tab, and then selecting the link that says “download a copy of your Facebook data." Facebook will send an email a few minutes later when data is ready to be downloaded, and users can retrieve their data as a zip file.  On “World News Tonight”, ABC News Chief Business correspondent Rebecca Jarvis showed a printout of one user's data download. The stack of data was hundreds of pages high.So if users were to download those hundreds of pages of data, what exactly would they find? Some of the available data that might be anticipated: likes, timeline posts and shares.But here are some other data points users might anticipate if they choose to download their data from Facebook based on a test conducted by ABC News, although each user's results might vary and be unique to them:
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  • ABC News(BETHLEHEM, Penn.) -- Easter egg hunts are part of a long tradition for many families across the country, and no Easter basket would be complete without marshmallow Peeps, jelly beans and chocolate eggs. With Easter around the corner, "World News Tonight" visited candymakers around the country that were readying themselves for the big springtime holiday.At Just Born Quality Confections in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, even the elevators smell of candy. For the last 65 years, the company has been making Peeps, the yellow marshmallow chicks and pink bunnies. The candymaker says it manufactures around 2 billion of the Easter basket essentials per year. Many of the 550 staff members who work at Just Born Quality Confections have been there for decades. Some of them, like one worker named Lisa, even met her husband assembling candy. In Fairfield, California, around 100 workers at the Jelly Belly jelly bean company poured in the color and sugar as they packed up jelly beans in bags bearing the American flag for Easter baskets.The company estimates that America will eat 5 billion jelly beans over Easter. On the East Coast, the 100 workers at Thompson Chocolate in Meriden, Connecticut, have produced 2.5 million pounds of chocolate a year over the company's 140-year history, with their chocolate Easter eggs coming off the line.“We are proudly made in America,” said one Thompson worker named Glenda, who was handling last-minute orders. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • United States District Court(CINCINNATI) -- A lawsuit has been filed against CVS Health claiming that it unintentionally revealed the HIV status of 6,000 of its customers in Ohio.In a federal lawsuit filed last Wednesday, three John Does are suing CVS and have sought class action status for the other affected customers. The plaintiffs have requested a jury trial.The three John Doe’s all live in different counties in Ohio but are clients of the Ohio HIV Drug Assistance Program, or OhDAP, which has had a contract with CVS since March 2017.Under that contract, CVS provides OhDAP clients with HIV medications and is responsible for communication relating to those medications.In late July or early August 2017, a letter containing membership cards, information about the CVS program and how to access their HIV medications was mailed to an estimated 6,000 participants in OhDAP.According to the lawsuit, the letter’s clearly showed the recipient’s HIV status through the envelope window above the patient’s name and address. "The Defendants' combined use of a glassine windowed envelope, their design of the letter containing the HIV status of the individual recipient such that it could be seen through the envelope window instead of using an opaque envelope or a letter that was properly spaced not to publicly reveal such information through the envelope window, and an identification reference with the term "HIV," the lawsuit alleges, "resulted in the potential or actual disclosure of recipients' HIV status to numerous individuals, including their families, friends, roommates, landlords, neighbors, mail carriers, and complete strangers."Fiserv, the company that CVS contracted to mail the information, is also named in the lawsuit.In a statement to ABC News on the lawsuit, CVS Health says, “CVS Health places the highest priority on protecting the privacy of those we serve, and we take our responsibility to safeguard confidential information very seriously. Last year, as part of a CVS Caremark benefits mailing to members of an Ohio client, a reference code for an assistance program was visible within the envelope window.""This reference code was intended to refer to the name of the program and not to the recipient’s health status," the statement continued. "As soon as we learned of this incident, we immediately took steps to eliminate the reference code to the plan name in any future mailings."
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  • DigitalVision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- One lucky winner could take home one of the largest jackpots in Mega Millions history.There hasn't been a Mega Millions winner in more than two months, and the jackpot now stands at $502 million -- and counting.The lump-sum cash payout? $301 million.The last drawing on March 27 was the 23rd straight Mega Millions drawing without a jackpot-winning ticket. However, two tickets sold in Illinois and New Jersey matched the five white balls on Tuesday night. The winners will take home $1 million each. It's the fourth time in the game's history that the jackpot has surged past half a billion dollars.The best thing a winner can do is stay anonymous, according to financial adviser Kurt Panouses, who helped a Florida couple that won a portion of the largest jackpot ever."The initial concern of the ticket is probably the most important part of the planning aspect," Panouses told ABC News. "What the individual should do is protect the ticket, keep it safe, put it in a safe place, but do not sign the back of the ticket.""Whoever signs the back of the ticket is the individual that has to claim the ticket and the proceeds," Panouses said.Panouses also suggested making a copy of the ticket and getting a tax professional and an attorney to help manage the funds and offer investment advice."The tax rate is the highest rate it's been at. In 2018, it's going to be 2.6 percent lower than in 2017. Again, if you're talking about $300 million, that could be $7 to $8 million of finances that someone could actually have in their pocket by claiming it in 2018," he said of the payout under the new tax law.A group of 20 co-workers from the North American Stamping Group who won a $420.9 million Powerball jackpot in 2016 split the winnings.One of the women from the group has used the money to pay it forward to people in need, including her own family, she told ABC News."To see my family in better shape, it's a blessing," Amy O'Neal said.If there is a winner, he or she could choose an annuity to receive 30 payments over 29 years or take a lump sum.Experts suggest that players use the full range of numbers available and not limit their chances by playing just numbers such as birthdays because months have no more than 31 days and Powerball numbers go up to 69.The largest Mega Millions jackpot in history was $656 million. Three winners from Kansas, Illinois and Maryland shared that record prize in March 2012.
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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Former top Obama administration official Susan Rice is joining Netflix to serve on its board of directors.“We are delighted to welcome Ambassador Rice to the Netflix board,” Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings said in a statement. “For decades, she has tackled difficult, complex global issues with intelligence, integrity and insight and we look forward to benefiting from her experience and wisdom.”Rice, 53, will be adding the Netflix position to her already extensive resume.She was a former U.S. diplomat and served as national security adviser under President Barack Obama until 2017.Rice was U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations when she became especially controversial in the days after the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya that took the lives of four Americans, including ambassador Chris Stevens.Rice was strongly criticized for comments she made on several Sunday talk shows, when using intelligence agency "talking points," said the attacks were “spontaneous" referring to protests against a controversial anti-Islam movie and appearing to downplay how the attack came about.“I am thrilled to be joining the board of directors of Netflix, a cutting-edge company whose leadership, high-quality productions, and unique culture I deeply admire,” Rice said in a statement.Some conservative online users, however, were not so thrilled, threatening to cancel their Netflix subscriptions in response to Rice's appointment.Netflix, a powerhouse media streaming company, has seen continual growth in subscriptions and success with their original shows like Stranger Things and House of Cards.In the next ten years, Netflix will hit 262 million subscriptions, according to Citi Research.
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