• Photodisc/Thinkstock(MONSON, Mass.) -- Two utility workers who grew up together in Massachusetts are being hailed as heroes after guiding to warmth and safety a diaper-clad 2-year-old girl who managed to wander into car traffic during bitter cold weather."This poor girl -- I think it was around 3 degrees or so on the thermometer," Shawn Bronson, 44, told ABC News. "She had nothing on but a diaper."Bronson was seated in Michael Payne's Comcast cable truck while his was in an auto shop being worked on two days ago.As they were driving along Main Street around 2:30 p.m. between two different service jobs in their hometown of Monson, Massachusetts, they noticed the toddler trying to cross the state highway, and were alarmed because there wasn't a parent nearby."We both looked at each other and said, 'Is that?' and 'Can you believe that?'" he said. "And then we just acted."Bronson said he jumped out of the Comcast truck to warn other drivers zooming along the heavily trafficked Route 32 as Payne scooped up the girl, who apparently wounded her leg."She ran right on the state highway," Bronson said. "She was in the middle of the road when she had fallen."The wound, Bronson said, collected some rock salt deposited that morning to ward off the icy conditions."The rock salt on her wound -- it was heart-wrenching," he said.Payne said her condition was dire at first.“Her skin was changing color, and she was shaking,” he said. “You could really see it in her feet because she was barefoot on the cold concrete.”The men whisked the little girl into the Woodbine Country Store and shed their gear to swaddle her.“We just started taking off our warm stuff,” Bronson said. “We bundled her up as best we could and proceeded to the warmest spot. It was the first thing we could think of.”Police in Monson praised the Comcast technicians."We commend these workers, who are also Monson residents, for their quick action leading to a positive outcome," the police said in the statement.The toddler, the police confirmed, wore only a diaper on a day, records show, when the low temperature reached just 1 degree Fahrenheit.The cops added that the men's vigilance as they drove along Main and Cushman Streets, in the New England town of less than 9,000 people, prevented what "could have had tragic consequences," the statement reads.The police, the statement added, eventually identified the child and soon questioned her father, who told them he "was completely unaware that the child had wandered off" until police informed him of her absence.The father is facing charges of reckless endangerment of a child; his daughter was transported to Wing Hospital to be evaluated, police said.In a company statement to ABC News, Comcast spokeswoman Kirsten Roberts expressed how proud they were of the two men and "so thankful that their quick and smart reactions helped save the child."The statement went on to say that both Bronson and Payne "are special people and employees, and we’re not surprised they immediately sprang into action."The 44-year-old heroes said they have worked together as teammates long before they were installing cable and fiber optics in states such as Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas."We've had quite a run," Bronson said. "Our families all know each other. We played soccer together, went to the same high school.""And we finish our own sentences," Payne said, laughing.Bronson and Payne also said they are fathers and raising daughters of their own.And as fathers, the rescue of the little girl in the freezing cold was something neither thought twice about."We had to do whatever we could do to help," Bronson said. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Twitter/@Ben_RA(NEW YORK) -- A grandmother's hilarious interaction with a new Google Home she addresses as "Goo Goo" was filmed by her software-engineer grandson, Ben Actis, and posted on YouTube."My 85-year-old Italian grandmother learns to use Google Home," Actis wrote. The video, as of midday Saturday, had more than 534,000 views.The grandmother addresses the contraption in front of her on a kitchen table as "Goo Goo," telling it, "I'm glad to meet you."She asks the device what the weather will be tomorrow, and when it answers in a woman's voice, the grandmother is apparently startled.She stands up and backs away from the Google Home.After she returns to sitting at the table, she asks "Goo Goo" to play her an Italian song.
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  • Apple(NEW YORK) -- Battery replacements for an iPhone 6 or later are available ahead of schedule for $29 after Apple admitted to slowing down devices as their batteries aged.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --   Wherever you’ll be on New Year’s Eve, there’s a good chance you’ll have a glass of bubbly in hand to ring in 2018. Champagne and sparkling wines (there is a difference) are no longer relegated to holidays, anniversaries and weddings; Americans are increasing their consumption of bubbles year-round. That said, 20 percent of all sales of sparkling wine and champagne occur in the last four weeks of the year, according to Nielsen. If you’re headed out to buy a bottle and are dumbstruck by all the options, here’s a guide and several recommendations to help you navigate the world of bubbly.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In these final days of 2017, experts are advising potential car buyers that if they're considering a new set of wheels, now is a good time to put the pedal to the metal before the new year arrives. "I used to think, 'Why would somebody buy a car around the holidays?' You know you'd see those ads and everyone was going, 'Well, you know, who buys a car at Christmas time?'" said Matt DeLorenzo, managing editor of Kelley Blue Book. "Actually it's been maybe over the last 10 years, that the end of the year has become sort of a prime car-selling season -- mainly because of these holiday event programs." According to DeLorenzo, manufacturers are closing out the books on the 2017 model year and still have a lot of cars left to sell. "You're seeing some pretty sizable rebates and incentives," he told ABC News. "You can see discounts as much as 20 [percent] to 25 percent off the MSRP [manufacturer suggested retail price]. ... You'll see some deals anywhere from [$6,000] to $8,000 off of new cars." DeLorenzo said buyers could see a bit deeper discounts this year because sales have slowed slightly -- down 2 percent over previous sales. "They're trying to push the deals to get the volume back up to record levels," he said. And if you're looking for a sedan, DeLorenzo said luck is on your side. "We're seeing the biggest discounts on sedans. People have been moving away from the four-door family cars into SUVs and crossovers," he said. "You'll see fewer deals on cross-overs and SUVs and the really big deals on the four-door sedans, particularly in the midsize and full-size segments." DeLorenzo shared the following tips for buyers looking to get their first car or simply add to their fleet: 1. Do your homework. Look for discounts and/or cash upfront. Find out what the car is worth. Arrange financing. 2. Shop prices on the internet. Go online before you head to the dealership. 3. Check your zip code online. Regional rebates may be offered for your part of the country. 4. Are you a recent graduate or veteran? If you are, there may be rebates that apply to those groups. 5. Negotiate your best deal upfront. Always have something your back pocket to use as a negotiating tool. Prices for the same car could vary at competing dealerships so use that as leverage.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images(PORTLAND, Wash.) -- A Washington state family is suing Alaska Airlines and a contractor for allegedly neglecting to properly care for a disabled 75-year-old grandmother who suffered a fall down a Portland International Airport escalator in June and later died. After her flight from Hawaii landed in Portland in June 2017, contractors at the airport assisted Bernice Kekona into a seat-belted wheelchair, both the lawsuit and the airline said. The employees from Huntleigh, USA were supposed to transport the 75-year-old grandmother to her next gate, according to the family, but she was somehow left alone. According to the lawsuit, Kekona showed her ticket to an Alaska Airlines employee stationed at her arrival gate who gestured the direction the grandmother needed to go in. Minutes later, the lawsuit says, Kekona was moving through the airport, confused and lost. She stopped at a security checkpoint and an airport store looking for her departure gate. Airport surveillance video obtained by ABC-affiliate KXLY, shows Kekona at the top of an escalator, which she later said she thought was an elevator. By the time she realized her misjudgment, her wheelchair was on the escalator and she was tumbling nearly 21 steps down the moving escalator. Video shows one man, riding up the opposite side of the pair of escalators, leaping over the sides to assist. Several others also rushed over, including one woman who found the emergency stop button. Kekona and her chair were eventually uprighted, but she was hurt. Her family says she suffered trauma to her head and chest, a cut to her Achilles tendon and gashes on the side of her face. Her tendon would never heal, according to her family. Federal law regulations require airlines to provide assistance to the disabled when traveling, including when making connections. Huntleigh, USA, who is contracted by Alaska Airlines for disability services through the airport, said it can’t comment yet because it has not seen the lawsuit filed Wednesday in King County Superior Court. Alaska Airlines said an investigation is continuing, but "it appears that Ms. Kekona declined ongoing assistance in the terminal and decided to proceed on her own to her connecting flight." "It also appears that when her family members booked the reservation, they did not check any of the boxes for a passenger with “Blind/low vision,” “Deaf/hard of hearing,” or “Other special needs (i.e., developmental or intellectual disability, senior/elderly).” So, there was no indication in the reservation that Ms. Kekona had cognitive, visual, or auditory impairments." Alaska added that they were "heartbroken by this tragic and disturbing incident." The family's lawyer says Kekona suffered constant, serious pain in the months to following the incident. In September, her wound to her tendon became so severe, doctors amputated her leg below the knee, according to a lawsuit filed by the family. Her blood pressure never recovered from the surgery and Kekona died the next day. Her family is now suing Alaska Airlines and Huntleigh, USA for failing to provide what they say was agreed upon gate-to-gate transportation. "I just want them to make it right. It's not going to bring her back, but someone needs to own up. Someone needs to take responsibility," said granddaughter Danielle Kekahuna. Federal law regulations require airlines to provide assistance to the disabled when traveling, including when making connections.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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