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  • Fripp Island Activity Center/Facebook(FRIPP ISLAND, S.C.) -- "Don't be stupid."So states the warning posted by a South Carolina resort urging people not to harass the alligators on the property after tourists threw carrots at one."The fine for harassing an alligator is $200," the Fripp Island Activity Center wrote in a post on Facebook. "That's $200 per carrot in this case. Y'all, make good choices. Don't be stupid. This is not how Fripp treats its wildlife."The post added that the resort has a description of the people involved and said they will be on the lookout.While alligator attacks are rare in South Carolina, experts say most happen when humans provoke them by feeding, prodding or swimming near them, according to the Island Packet, a local paper."These animals are really simple," Fripp Island naturalist Jessica Miller said, according to the Island Packet. "They like to be in their water or bask right by it. We just need to stay back."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • @LouisVuitton/Twitter(PARIS) -- Fashion company Louis Vuitton made history Monday when it announced the new artistic director of its menswear collection."Louis Vuitton is delighted to welcome Virgil Abloh as its new Men’s Artistic Director," the luxury brand tweeted today, marking the first time an African-American designer has received the influential position."His first show will take place in June during Men’s Fashion Week in Paris."Abloh, 37, replaced Kim Jones, who left the 164-year-old label after its fall 2018 collection in January.“It is an honor for me to accept this position,” the designer told Vogue in a statement. “I find the heritage and creative integrity of the house are key inspirations and will look to reference them both while drawing parallels to modern times.”When news of Abloh's announcement came today, social media celebrated. In case you're in the dark about Abloh's career and long list of accomplishments, here are five things you need to know:1. He's been nominated for a GrammyLouis Vuitton's newest designer was nominated for a Grammy for his work on Jay Z and Kanye West's 2011 joint album "Watch the Throne." Abloh got the nod for best recording package. It makes sense that Abloh would've designed the packaging for the hit album because he has worked as West's creative director on many projects.2. He has his own labelIt's called Off-White, and there's a reason behind the streetwear label's cool name. It refers to "the grey area between black and white," according to the label's website.Off-White, founded in 2012, features collections for both men and women along with furniture and special collaborations with other designers, such as Jimmy Choo and Sunglass Hut.3. He's married to his high school sweetheartAbloh wed his wife, Shannon, in 2009 after meeting her in high school. Although his parents are from Ghana, Abloh was raised in Chicago and attended Boylan Catholic High School. He would later obtain a civil engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and later a Master of Architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology.4. Michael Jordan is a huge inspirationYes, that Michael Jordan. The Chicago-bred designer spoke about how the basketball legend has inspired his career, calling it in a 2015 GQ interview "that Jordan effect." He said, "Allow people to see the growth. My brain moves way too fast, and I want to go from zero to a hundred really quick."5. He's a DJAnd he has touched turntables in the most envious parts of the world, including Milan, where his fashion label is based.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- Amid mounting accusations that data firm Cambridge Analytica misused the Facebook data of up to 50 million user profiles, the U.K.-based firm and its top executives are now also under fire for alleged violations of U.S. election laws.Government watchdog group Common Cause Monday filed a pair of legal complaints with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and the Department of Justice accusing Cambridge Analytica LTD, its parent company SCL Group Limited, CEO Alexander Nix, SCL co-founder Nigel Oakes, data scientist Alexander Tayler, and former employee-turned-whistleblower Christopher Wylie of violating federal election laws that prohibit foreigners from participating directly or indirectly in the decision-making process of U.S. political campaigns.The defendants are all non-U.S. citizens, according to the complaints.The Trump campaign paid Cambridge Analytica nearly $6 million for services during the 2016 election cycle, according to data from the FEC.Seventeen other Republican political organizations, including Ted Cruz's presidential campaign and a super PAC headed by incoming National Security Adviser John Bolton, also paid the firm a combined $16 million for services that included research and micro-targeting of voters, government records show.The complaints cite a New York Times report of an alleged memo dated July 22, 2014 from lawyer Laurence Levy, then at the firm Bracewell & Giuliani, to GOP megadonor Rebekah Mercer, former Trump adviser Steve Bannon and the now-suspended Nix. The memo warns them that foreign nationals “may not play strategic roles” in U.S. political campaigns, including giving “strategic advice,” but that foreigners can still “act as functionaries that collect and process data” as long as the final analysis of that data is conducted by U.S. citizens.Levy suggested at the time that as a foreign national, Nix should recuse himself “from substantive management” of clients involved in U.S. elections, according to the complaints.The legal filings allege that Cambridge Analytica and its executives ignored Levy’s advice and allowed foreigners to be involved in “management decisions of U.S. political committee clients concerning expenditures and disbursements during the 2014 and 2016 elections.”Common Cause is calling for both the FEC and the Justice Department to investigate any potential election law violations and impose appropriate sanctions and restraints.“It defies belief that even after their own attorney warned them that they would be violating the prohibition on performing certain election-related activities in U.S. elections that they did so anyway,” said Paul S. Ryan, Common Cause vice president for policy and litigation. “A full investigation must be conducted, and if Cambridge Analytica and its staff did in fact repeatedly violate our laws, then there must be punishment levied sufficient to deter similar lawbreaking in future.”Cambridge Analytica has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing involving accusations of collecting data from millions of Facebook profiles without knowledge and issued a statement to that effect last week.“We take the disturbing recent allegations of unethical practices in our non-US political business very seriously,” acting CEO Alexander Taylor said in a statement. “As anyone who is familiar with our staff and work can testify, we in no way resemble the politically-motivated and unethical company that some have sought to portray.”The company did not immediately reply to requests for comment from ABC News about the newest claims of alleged violations of U.S. election laws.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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