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  • Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEWARK, N.J.) -- Days after a flap over an emotional support peacock at Newark Airport, United has updated their emotional support animal policy.The airline said it has seen a 75 percent increase in emotional support animals over the past year -- and a significant increase in "onboard incidents.""The Department of Transportation’s rules regarding emotional support animals are not working as they were intended to, prompting us to change our approach in order to ensure a safe and pleasant travel experience for all of our customers," United said in a statement.A woman's emotional support peacock was denied boarding on a United flight out of Newark late last month."This animal did not meet guidelines for a number of reasons, including its weight and size. We explained this to the customers on three separate occasions before they arrived at the airport," United said in a statement.Starting March 1, United customers traveling with emotional support animals must provide confirmation that the animal has been properly trained and affirmation from a veterinarian that the animal has been vaccinated and won't "pose a direct threat to the health and safety of others on the aircraft or cause a significant disruption in service."As they did before, they also need to provide 48 hours' notice and a letter from a mental health processional.United's policy update comes on the heels of Delta's update, which requires passengers traveling with an emotion support animal to provide a signed document "confirming that their animal can behave."Unlike Delta, which drew ire for including service animals such as seeing-eye dogs in its policy update, United's policy update does not apply to service animals.American, which has also seen an increase in emotional support animals, said they're reviewing their own requirements "with the goal of protecting our team members and our customers who have a real need for a trained service or support animal." Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Mark Cuthbert/UK Press/Getty Images(SMALAND, Sweden) -- Ingvar Kamprad, who founded the global Ikea furniture chain, has died at age 91.“One of the greatest entrepreneurs of the 20th century, Ingvar Kamprad, has peacefully passed away at his home in Smaland, Sweden, on Jan. 27," Ikea said in an emailed statement to Bloomberg on Sunday. The company is known for producing furniture that is easy to transport -- and, for many customers, easy on the wallet. Kamprad had an estimated net worth of $58.7 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. This made him the world's eighth-richest person. In 2017, 403 Ikea stores in almost 50 countries received more than 900 million visitors, and the chain generated sales of $47.6 billion, according to Bloomberg. The U.K.’s Icon magazine named Kamprad the most influential taste-maker in the world in 2005. The name Ikea is made up of the founder’s initials and the first letters of the Elmtaryd farm and Agunnaryd village where he was raised, according to Bloomberg.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Zoonar/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Coca-Cola is pledging to recycle a used can or bottle for each one sold by 2030. This approach is part of what the company called a "global goal" to reduce waste. Coca-Cola said it plans to guide consumers through the recycling process with educational outreach, according to a statement. The company said it also aims to make bottles with an average of 50 percent recycled content by 2030.“The world has a packaging problem -- and, like all companies, we have a responsibility to help solve it,” said James Quincey, president and CEO of the Coca-Cola Co., which sells 500 brands of soda, juice and water.“Bottles and cans shouldn’t harm our planet, and a litter-free world is possible,” Quincey said. “Companies like ours must be leaders. Consumers around the world care about our planet, and they want and expect companies to take action. That’s exactly what we’re going to do, and we invite others to join us on this critical journey.” This comes after mounting pressure from consumers and other entities to reduce waste. Earlier this week, the European Union announced a strategy to make sure that all packaging is recyclable by 2030 and to curb single-use items such as bottles, according to Bloomberg. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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