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  • Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Thousands of drones were used to put on a light show during the opening ceremony for the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday morning for the first time, according to Intel, which is overseeing the event.A total of 1,218 drones outfitted with LED lights were used to paint a "colorful illustration in the sky," setting a new Guinness World Record on the number of drones flown at the same time, according to an Intel spokeswoman. Intel holds the current record after 500 drones were flown simultaneously for a light show in Krailling, Germany, on Oct. 7, the spokeswoman said.The drones are controlled through an automated software program, though they do have one pilot for backup, Intel said.In addition to the opening ceremony, the drones will be used throughout the games, creating light-filled formations every night from Feb. 10 -24 during the nightly victory ceremonies."It's something that we wanted to integrate that experience into the Olympics on a daily occasion, because not everyone is going to be at the opening ceremony, and we want to give everyone in Korea a chance to see these shows," said Natalie Cheung, the general manager for Intel's drone light shows.An athlete on a snowboard; a bird of prey in flight; and, of course, the five interlaced Olympic rings are among the aerial illustrations that viewers can anticipate seeing during the shows.The drones are lightweight and are the only ones of their kind, built specifically for outdoor light shows, according to Intel.Because Intel's drones had never flown in such cold temperatures, members of the drone light show team ventured to the Alps to test how they would operate in minus 10-degree Celsius weather."We were a little bit more creative about this," Cheung said. "We changed our operations so that we had literally minutes for us to bring the drones outside the temperature-controlled room into the fields so we could fly. We needed to make sure the batteries were warm enough so the drones could fly."Intel is the official drone partner of the Olympics.
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  • Empojipedia(NEW YORK) -- From a microbe to a mango, 2018 will see the release of dozens of new emojis, according to a statement from Unicode, the organization in charge of emoji data and development. Unicode finalized the list on Wednesday.“Emoji 11.0 has been released, with 157 new emojis such as hot face, red-haired woman, mosquito and pirate flag,” reads the statement.Now that Unicode has released the data for each emoji, individual smartphone vendors will develop the emojis for their devices. According to Unicode, smartphone users can expect the new emojis to be released in August or September of this year.Emojipedia, a database for all things emoji, created mock-ups of what the emojis would look like on an Apple iPhone.Unicode is taking proposals from anyone for emoji 12.0, which must be submitted before the end of March 2018.
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  • Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images(LAS VEGAS) -- Embattled casino kingpin Steve Wynn has stepped down from his position as CEO and chairman of the board of directors of Wynn Resorts, following multiple allegations against him of sexual misconduct, which he has vehemently denied.The company's new CEO is Matt Maddox, Wynn said."In the last couple of weeks, I have found myself the focus of an avalanche of negative publicity," Wynn, 76, said in a statement. "As I have reflected upon the environment this has created -- one in which a rush to judgment takes precedence over everything else, including the facts -- I have reached the conclusion I cannot continue to be effective in my current roles. Therefore, effective immediately, I have decided to step down as CEO and chairman of the Board of Wynn Resorts, a company I founded and that I love."Wynn continued, "The succession plan laid out by the board of directors and which I wholeheartedly endorse now places Matt Maddox in the CEO seat. With Matt, Wynn Resorts is in good hands. He and his team are well-positioned to carry on the plans and vision for the company I created."Wynn is reportedly worth $3.4 billion, according to Forbes.Non-executive director of the Wynn board, Boone Wayson, said in a statement, "It is with a collective heavy heart that the board of directors of Wynn Resorts today accepted the resignation of our founder, CEO and friend Steve Wynn.”Wayson added, "He is a philanthropist and a beloved leader and visionary. He played the pivotal role in transforming Las Vegas into the entertainment destination it is today."In an initial statement, following the allegations, Wynn said any claim that he "ever assaulted any woman is preposterous."He added, "We find ourselves in a world where people can make allegations, regardless of the truth, and a person is left with the choice of weathering insulting publicity or engaging in multiyear lawsuits," Wynn said in the original statement. "It is deplorable for anyone to find themselves in this situation."As ABC News reported, Wynn stepped down late last month as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee just over 24 hours after publication of the allegations in The Wall Street Journal."Effective today, I am resigning as finance chairman of the RNC," the 76-year-old said in a statement to ABC News as pressure mounted on the RNC to address the allegations against him.Last week, the University of Pennsylvania announced that it will remove Wynn's name from a campus plaza and revoke an honorary degree given to him.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The women who slammed Monster Energy with five separate lawsuits have spoken out -- one saying her boss called her a "whore," another saying she was berated at work for having kids, and one woman even claiming she was assaulted by an executive at the beverage company.The five women each shared their very different stories of alleged mistreatment in an interview with ABC News' Amy Robach, claiming that they were harassed and disrespected while working behind the scenes at the beverage company."This is all I have left -- just my voice. And the truth has to be heard," said Paige Zeringue, a former employee of the energy drink maker.Zeringue is suing Monster Energy, arguing in court documents filed last June that she was subject to "sexual harassment" and a "hostile work environment" while working at the company.Zeringue told ABC News that she was initially in a consensual sexual relationship with her former boss at the company, John Kenneally."I realized very soon that it was absolutely the worst mistake of my life," Zeringue said.She added that she told him she wanted out of the relationship, and angry texts and verbal abuse soon followed."He would call me names and things that no one in my life would ever call me," she said. "He would call me a whore."Kenneally resigned as vice president of Monster Energy late Thursday night. ABC News attempted to contact Kenneally, but was unable to reach him for comment.Another former employee, Fran Pulizzi, told ABC News that she had heard Kenneally call another female employee a "whore.""And it wasn't uncommon for him to discuss sexual relations among employees," Pulizzi added.Pulizzi argues in a lawsuit filed last May that after she had been working at the company for five years, she was subjected to hostile and harassing behavior from Kenneally when she participated in an investigation by human resources into another employee’s sexual harassment complaint."I thought for sure they were going to keep my statements confidential," Pulizzi said. "When I found out within a few days that John had been made aware of everything I said, I was in shock."Pulizzi alleges that Kenneally then began to bully and harass her at work before ultimately freezing her out."He refused to talk to me, and our open communication was a key part of my job," she said. "He refused to work with me, refused to acknowledge me."Another former employee, Jamie Hogan, argued in court documents filed last August that her former supervisor at Monster Energy would "publicly insult and berate her for having children.""He would make comments about, 'Oh, we'd have to move our meeting so that Jamie could go home at night and see her kids,'" Hogan told ABC News.She added that he would also schedule "impromptu meetings.""I didn’t show up because I wasn’t aware of it," she said. "It just became increasingly difficult to do my job."Hogan said she felt retaliated against after she reported her concerns to the human resources department, and eventually left the company.Sarah Lozano, a former employee in the HR department at Monster Energy, is also suing her former employer.Lozano claimed that, at a work event in Las Vegas, her female boss confronted her about a rumor."The rumor started that I had sex with multiple people in a restroom at a hotel," Lozano said. "She said that I had ruined the credibility of the human resources department because of my actions.""I was mortified. I was shocked," she added. "I absolutely denied it."Lozano argues in her lawsuit that as a result of the confrontation about the rumor, her work and health suffered and that she was "ridiculed on a weekly basis" by her boss. After seven months, she said she left the company.Freelance makeup artist Sarah Rabuse told ABC News that she was dating an executive at Monster Energy and did the makeup at several company events."Brent Hamilton, who was the head of music marketing, was my boyfriend," Rabuse told ABC N
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- There's less than 48 hours before the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles square off at Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, Minnesota, but for these U.S. workers, whose companies are helping get game day and the festivities around it off the ground, every day is a winner.Sportsfield SpecialtiesThe company produces goal posts and other sporting goods, and has been around since 1998. The company employs about 100 people who weld, shape and paint about 1,000 goal posts a year in Delhi, New York. Sportsfield Specialties also has 50 workers in Salisbury, North Carolina, at its netting and wall-pad manufacturing facility.This will be the seventh time its goal posts will be in the Super Bowl. The materials for the goal posts come from all over the U.S.Turf NationTurf Nation is located in Dalton, Georgia, and makes synthetic turf systems. According to Turf Nation, 14 of the 32 NFL franchises play or practice on a turf system produced by the company. And on Sunday, the company will celebrate its fourth NFL Super Bowl in the last six years."All components of a Turf Nation synthetic turf system are proudly manufactured in the U.S.A., and each surface is custom-designed to a team's or school's specific needs," Turf Nation said in a news release. "All synthetic turf surfaces are field-tested by an independent laboratory prior to shipping."Turf Nation employs more than 80 workers around the U.S. and makes its turf system out of the same material used in plastic bottles and garbage bags. Last year, the company produced more than 10 million square feet of turf.Turf Nation employs more than 80 workers around the U.S. and makes its turf system out of the same material used in plastic bottles and garbage bags. Last year, the company produced more than 10 million square feet of turf.WeatherTechThe workers at WeatherTech, which makes vehicle accessories such as floor mats and window deflectors, are hard at work this year for their fifth consecutive Super Bowl ad.The ad shows employees building a brand-new factory in Boolingbrook, Illinois, right outside Chicago. WeatherTech told ABC News that the company now employs nearly 2,000 people.Love Your MelonAs fans touch down in Minneapolis this week for the big game, 10,000 volunteers will be around town greeting them. Love Your Melon's purple hats will help keep many of them warm.The company in Minneapolis employs 200 workers who have collectively stitched more than 1 million hats a year."It gives everyone here at home a good sense of pride and the ability to say, 'Hey, I made this,'" Love Your Melon' production manager Kelsey Nelsen said.Half of every Love Your Melon sale goes to cancer research and support programs. Workers also visit hospitals across the U.S., donating hats and their time to children fighting cancer."It's keeping jobs right here in our country, and we're just really proud of that," Love Your Melon's Linsey Johnson said.
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