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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed in the red on Tuesday as oil prices sunk. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 30.23 (-0.13 percent) to finish at 23,409.47.The Nasdaq fell 19.72 (-0.29 percent) to close at 6,737.87, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,578.87, down 5.97 (-0.23 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices sunk about 2.5 percent to $55 per barrel.Winners and Losers:  A second day of losses for General Electric after announcing Monday it would slash its quarterly dividend by 50 percent. Shares tumbled 5.89 percent.Shares of Buffalo Wild Wings soared 23.97 percent after reports private equity firm Roark Capital made an offer to buy the sports bar franchise.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Following a 19-month investigation, the National Transportation Safety Board identified 20 different factors that contributed to the April 2016 crash that killed two veteran Amtrak employees and injured 39 passengers when the company's train struck a backhoe and derailed in Chester, Pennsylvania.Investigators said Amtrak had a "weak safety culture" where employees frequently took short cuts and put on-time performance over safety.The NTSB previously disclosed toxicology reports indicating marijuana in the system of the train's engineer and cocaine or opioids in the systems of the killed maintenance workers, but they did not conclude that drugs impaired the employees at the time of the crash.While drug use did not have a "direct causal link to this accident," according to investigators, it is a reflection of a lax safety culture at Amtrak, they said.The Federal Railroad Administration revised its federal drug testing rules to include Maintenance of Way workers. This rule went into effect on June 12, 2017. Previously DOT regulations only required drug testing for locomotive engineers, trainmen, conductors, switchmen, locomotive helpers, utility employees, signalmen, operators and train dispatchers.These rules establish minimum requirements for drug testing. Rail companies are free to expand them.On Monday the FRA said it was adding certain semi-synthetic opioids such as hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxymorphone and oxycodone to its testing.“The opioid crisis is a threat to public safety when it involves safety-sensitive employees involved in the operation of any kind of vehicle or transport,” said Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. “The ability to test for a broader range of opioids will advance transportation safety significantly and provide another deterrence to opioid abuse, which will better protect the public and ultimately save lives.”Railroad repairs were ongoing in the days leading up to the fatal accident. A night foreman was found to have lifted a track closure while a backhoe remained on the track. The day foreman did not restore the closure, according to investigators, leading to a train striking the backhoe at nearly 100 mph.NTSB chairman Robert Sumwalt described the mistake by the foremen as "the fundamental error of the night."“Under no circumstances should you clear foul times with men and equipment fouling the track,” said Joe Gordon, who investigated track and engineering issues for the board.Among the contributing factors to the crash were lack of communication between employees, improper establishment of work zones, lack of shunts and pressure from managers to keep trains on time.Positive Train Control had been installed in the Northeast Corridor where the crash occurred, but investigators said a series of human errors, such as not properly establishing the work zone, circumvented PTC technology.Despite Amtrak requiring the use of shunts at the time, investigators said the maintenance workers did not have them at the accident site. The NTSB said the shunts could have signaled that the track was occupied and prevented the crash.Amtrak has since purchased thousands of the devices.Amtrak spokeswoman Kimberly Woods told ABC News that Amtrak has "taken a series of actions to improve workplace safety at Amtrak," but did not respond when asked what exactly those actions are.The engineer of the involved train was fired following the accident, according to Amtrak.An NTSB spokesperson said the list of board recommendations would be posted later Tuesday.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's been 25 years since the release of Home Alone 2: Lost in New York. To celebrate, the Plaza Hotel, which plays a prominent role in the film, is offering a package that allows guests to live it up like Kevin McAllister.Rates start at $895, only slightly less than the $967 Kevin spent on room service during his stay."In-room and throughout the hotel a variety of experiences inspired by Kevin's time over the holiday's here at The Plaza will come to life for guests to enjoy," according to the hotel's website. "Beyond the in-room experience, guests are invited to dine in the Todd English Food Hall to taste-test a 90s inspired menu with upscale versions of childhood favorites, or to head over to the interactive photo-experience where they’ll find themselves in Kevin’s New York journey."Included in the package is an "over-the-top" ice cream sundae from room service, just like the one Kevin had in the film.The hotel concierge will also arrange for guests to experience quintessential New York sights, like the Empire State Building, Wollman Rink and a limo trip through the city.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed slightly higher on Monday, but uncertainty over tax reform and tumbling General Electric shares weighed on stocks.The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 17.49 (+0.07 percent) to finish at 23,439.70.The Nasdaq jumped 6.66 (+0.10 percent) to close at 6,757.60, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,584.84, up 2.54 (+0.10 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were flat and under $57 per barrel.Winners and Losers:  Shares of General Electric sunk 7.17 percent when it announced it would cut its quarterly dividend by half.After reporting better-than-expected quarterly earnings last week, Roku's stock skyrocketed 28.45 percent on news of a Black Friday deal with AT&T's DIRECTV.
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  • Dunkin Donuts(NEW YORK) -- Dunkin' Donuts is betting dollars on cookie-flavored doughnuts this holiday season, taking a cue from the huge popularity of its cookie-dough-flavored coffee.For the 2017 holidays, the ubiquitous doughnut chain is trying out two specialty cookie flavors: a frosted sugar cookie doughnut with cookie dough filling and topped with cookie crumbles and a gingerbread cookie doughnut decorated with caramel frosting and gingerbread cookie sprinkles.The cookie flavors follow high demand for the cookie dough coffee flavor, which has been a longtime fan favorite, according to a recent poll that Dunkin' Donuts conducted. The coffee flavor could make a summer 2018 return, since it fared so well in the poll.This isn't the first holiday season that Dunkin' Donuts has paid homage to holiday cookies. Its 2015 holiday menu had a sugar-cookie-flavored coffee, which is not being offered this season.Last Valentine's Day, the doughnutmaker's holiday menu featured its first cookie-dough-filled varieties, in heart shapes and with pink frosting.The company, headquartered in Massachusetts, will be serving holiday-decorated doughnuts and Munchkins — its name for doughnut holes — with snowflake sprinkles.This year's seasonal cookie-flavored doughnuts will be available by Nov. 20, the company said.
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