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  • Roy Rochlin/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- CBS News has suspended veteran journalist Charlie Rose after eight women accused him of sexual misconduct in interviews with The Washington Post."Charlie Rose is suspended immediately while we look into this matter. These allegations are extremely disturbing and we take them very seriously," CBS News said in a statement.Five women told The Washington Post that Rose, an anchor for "CBS This Morning," groped them; two said that he walked naked in front of them; and one accused Rose of firing her after he allegedly touched her inappropriately and made sexually charged remarks to her.The newspaper reported that Rose's accusers either worked with or aspired to work with him on his PBS show, "Charlie Rose," from the late 1990s to 2011. At the time of the alleged incidents, the women ranged in age from 21 to 37, according to the newspaper.Rose issued an apology to the Post and later, he shared it on Twitter.“In my 45 years in journalism, I have prided myself on being an advocate for the careers of the women with whom I have worked,” he said in a statement to the newspaper. “Nevertheless, in the past few days, claims have been made about my behavior toward some former female colleagues.“It is essential that these women know I hear them and that I deeply apologize for my inappropriate behavior. I am greatly embarrassed. I have behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate. I always felt that I was pursuing shared feelings, even though I now realize I was mistaken," he continued. "I have learned a great deal as a result of these events, and I hope others will too. All of us, including me, are coming to a newer and deeper recognition of the pain caused by conduct in the past, and have come to a profound new respect for women and their lives.”Kyle Godfrey-Ryan, a former assistant to Rose in the mid-2000s and one of the three accusers who spoke to the newspaper on the record, claimed that Rose walked nude in front of her at one of his homes in New York City and called her in the wee hours to describe fantasies of watching her swim naked. She said that she reported his calls to Rose's longtime executive producer, Yvette Vega, who apparently told her, "That's just Charlie being Charlie." Vega told the Post and later confirmed to ABC News that she regretted not doing more for Godfrey-Ryan and others who mounted similar complaints.“I should have stood up for them,” she said. “I failed. It is crushing. I deeply regret not helping them.”Godfrey-Ryan said that ultimately, Rose fired her, and she later left journalism.“He took me out to lunch and told me how embarrassed he was, how he didn’t treat me like that,” she said. “It was really about how I got it wrong, and, obviously, I couldn’t work there anymore.”Reah Bravo, who worked alongside Rose beginning in 2007, claimed to the Post that she was groped -- sometimes forcefully -- by Rose on more than one occasion. In 2008, she said that as she prepared to accept a new job, Rose offered her a position in Washington, D.C., and the opportunity to live in his Georgetown residence. She declined.“I was leaving because I was getting away,” she said. “I would never want to live someplace where he had keys.”Megan Creydt, the third woman who spoke to the Post on the record, overlapped with Godfrey-Ryan when she worked as a coordinator on Rose's show from 2005 to 2006. Creydt claimed that Rose put his hand on her thigh, which alarmed her."I don’t think I said anything,” she said. “I tensed up. I didn’t move his hand off, but I pulled my legs to the other side of the car. I tried not to get in a car with him ever again. I think he was testing me out.”PBS says it has reportedly suspended the distribution of Rose's show in light of the claims.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Justice Department is suing AT&T to block the telecommunications giant from buying Time Warner, the media conglomerate with such television networks as CNN, TBS and HBO.The $108 billion-dollar merger “would substantially lessen competition” and result in “higher prices for consumers and less innovation for millions of Americans,” a Justice Department official said Monday in announcing the lawsuit.For weeks, the Justice Department and AT&T have been trying to hammer out a deal that would allay government concerns and allow the purchase to move forward, but those efforts have apparently failed.“We gave a very good faith effort to try to resolve the harm that the government was able to find,” the Justice Department official said about negotiations with Time Warner, which already owns DirecTV.“The combination of AT&T [and] DirectTV’s vast distribution infrastructure, and Time Warner’s extremely popular television programming would be one of the largest mergers in American history,” the official added.That “combined power” would let AT&T “use its control over Time Warner’s popular and valuable networks to hinder its rivals, by forcing them to pay hundreds of millions of dollars more per year for the right to distribute those networks,” the official said.The Justice Department official also warned that such a merger could allow AT&T to slow down advances in technology that would cut costs for consumers.In statements to the Justice Department, AT&T said specifically that distributors who control popular programming “have the incentive and ability to use that control as a weapon to hinder competition,” the official quoted AT&T as saying verbatim.Without “an adequate remedy that would fully prevent the harms, the “only appropriate action” was to seek an injunction from a federal judge in hopes of blocking the merger, according to the official. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.Nevertheless, the official said Justice Department attorneys “remain open” to further negotiations with AT&T.Monday’s announcement comes two weeks after a controversy erupted publicly over whether AT&T would have to sell off CNN to sidestep government concerns about the company’s plan to buy Time Warner.According to Justice Department officials at the time, AT&T offered to divest from CNN and later sell the news network. The officials said they flatly rejected the offer.However, the chairman and CEO of AT&T denied any of that ever happened."Throughout this process, I have never offered to sell CNN and have no intention of doing so," Randall Stephenson said in a statement provided to ABC News.The Trump administration has had a strained relationship with the news network.The president previously labeled the network's journalism "fake" and "fraud" news, and he mockingly called the channel the "Clinton News Network" during last year's presidential race against Hillary Clinton.Speaking with reporters on Monday, the Justice Department official said his team was given no guidance from the White House about how to proceed and was not coordinating its own efforts with the White House.“The relief we’re seeking today would CNN exactly where it is right now,” the official said.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed in the green ahead of the holiday week.The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 72.09 (+0.31 percent) to finish at 23,430.33.The Nasdaq gained 7.92 (+0.12 percent) to close at 6,790.71, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,582.14, up 3.29 (+0.13 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices sunk about 0.5 percent to $56 per barrel.Winners and Losers: Marvell Technology has agreed to buy a smaller, rival chipmaker Cavium for about $6 billion. Cavium's shares jumped 10.80 percent.Shares of Abercrombie & Fitch continued to rally after posting third-quarter same-store sales growth on Friday and an upbeat forecast for the holidays. The retailer's stock soared 9.58 percent.More losses for General Electric; shares tumbled 1.26 percent on Monday.
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  • Chrysler(NEW YORK) -- A consumer advocacy group is calling for a recall of all 2017 Chrysler Pacifica's because the federal government has received more than 50 complaints that say the minivans stalled during operation.In addition to its plea to Chrysler, the nonprofit Center for Auto Safety will file a petition with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Monday asking the agency to open a defect investigation, the group said.The automaker is aware of the complaints and routinely monitors the performance of its vehicles, company spokesman Eric Mayne said. Like the federal government, Fiat-Chrysler has received no reports of injuries or accidents from the alleged problem.The Italian-American corporation has sold 150,000 of the 2017 Pacifica's, making it the bestselling minivan in its class, according to the advocacy group. The vehicle has won various awards for safety, including one from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and a five-star overall safety rating from NHTSA.Owners are able to file complaints with the Department of Transportation via the NHTSA website, but the government does not verify every complaint. The Center for Auto Safety is asking federal regulators to open an investigation and seek more information about the complaints and from the automaker.“At U.S. DOT’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), safety is the top priority. NHTSA will carefully review the Center for Auto Safety’s petition and then take any appropriate action,” NHTSA said in a statement.The Center for Auto Safety is also calling on Chrysler to give out loaner vehicles until the manufacturer is able to identify and remedy the problem.The owners complain that the minivans, some with as few as a couple hundred miles of usage on them, have been stalling at various speeds, from idling to traveling over 60 mph, and come with seemingly random warning lights seen on the dashboard.“The danger goes beyond what happens to families in the stalled minivan during the loss of power, as drivers of disabled vehicles are often hit and killed by other cars after they have pulled over to the side of the road," Center for Auto Safety Executive Director Jason Levine said.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday? If yes, now is the perfect time to review simple steps you can take to make traveling for the holiday less stressful.First and foremost, if you're driving, don't leave on the Tuesday evening before Thanksgiving.According to traffic app Waze, the worst time to travel before Thanksgiving will be 5 p.m. local time on Tuesday, Nov. 21. The worst time to travel home after Thanksgiving will be Monday, Nov. 27 between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. local time. However, there will also be a spike of midday travel on Sunday, with the worst traffic likely at 2 p.m. local time.For those flying, Wednesday and Sunday are the days to avoid.Whether driving or flying, Thanksgiving day is generally a good day to take to the roads or skies.When it comes to airport safety, there are different rules for kids than adults.Kids under 12 aren't subject to the same regulations at airport security. So feel free to leave your toddler's shoes and jacket on while going through the metal detector. Seniors may also leave on shoes and light jackets. As for a baby's necessities, breast milk, formula, baby food and other essentials are not subject to the three-ounce liquid rule, though they will likely have a secondary screening.Speaking of kids . . .Some airlines allow families with small children to board the flight first. Don't do this. It only adds more time for children to be confined to their seats. If possible, store the carry-ons ahead and have one adult stay with the kids to try to board as close to takeoff as possible.Know what you can bring on board and what you can't.Stuffing can fly, but can cranberry sauce? What about gravy? Find the answers to all your Thanksgiving leftover carry-on questions on the Transportation Security Administration's website using it's handy tool, "Can I bring?"Laptops can stay in your bag, sometimes.Check your boarding pass to see if you were selected for TSA Precheck. If you were, your laptop can stay in your bag. And, like a kid or a senior, your shoes and jacket can stay on. Precheck is available at more than 100 U.S. airports and offers expedited security lines. You may get lucky and get picked, but you can sign up for precheck online at a cost of $85 for five years.Plan ahead for airport parking.Lots fill up fast and the last thing you want to do is miss your flight while you're looking for a parking spot. Book ahead and you may even get a discount at off-airport lots. Leave plenty of time to get from the lot to your airline terminal.Avoid checking a bag if possible.
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