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  • Taylor Dunn(NEW YORK) -- Growing up in Arizona, Kara Goldin had no idea she would one day be working to revolutionize the American beverage industry.“I’ve always had this mindset that you just have to keep learning along the way and trying to figure it out. I also have a lot of trust of what happens day after day without thinking through exactly what’s going to happen next week,” Goldin told ABC News' Rebecca Jarvis on an episode of ABC Radio’s “No Limits With Rebecca Jarvis."Goldin had an early introduction to the world of healthy ingredients from her father, who worked in the Healthy Choice division of Conagra. When Goldin was born and her mom went back to work, her father was determined to make healthier, easier meals for Goldin and her four older siblings, she said.“My dad decided that he didn’t like TV dinners that were the typical, mystery meat TV dinners that were available in the frozen food section so he decided, 'What if I develop a better-tasting ... TV dinner, which was Healthy Choice.”Goldin later went on to study communications in college and minored in finance at Arizona State. She originally set out to become a journalist, but instead found herself in the tech world, working her way up the ladder at AOL, where she became VP of shopping and e-commerce partnerships and grew AOL’s shopping startup to over $1 billion in under seven years.Goldin’s shift from Silicon Valley executive to beverage CEO came gradually. After her third child was born, Goldin “really started to look at everything not only that I was doing from an exercise perspective, but also from an eating perspective and drinking perspective.”Her final challenge: giving up Diet Coke, of which she says she consumed 12 cans of every day!“I had a love affair with my Diet Coke,” Goldin said. She quit cold turkey.Her replacement? “I was never a water drinker. And so I started slicing up fruit and throwing it in water to get myself to drink more water.”When she looked for a similar product in the grocery store, she couldn’t find it. So she set to work in her own kitchen, brewing up water with no sweeteners and a hint of natural fruit flavoring.The same day Goldin gave birth to her fourth child, Hint Water made its debut at Whole Foods. As Hint Water began growing, Golden says she reached out to an executive at a large beverage company for advice. What he told her changed everything. He said: “This company will never work because Americans love sweets.”That's when she says she realized, “We could actually change health in America by helping people really eliminate their need for sweet.”Now Hint is sold in stores like Whole Foods, Target and Wal-Mart, and is the main brand of water at tech companies including Google and Facebook. Goldin attributes Hint’s success to her tech background, but also to the healthy choices her father made.“I never really realized the impact that had on me. I didn’t go into food right away,” she said.“I think just being able to look at something and say, 'I can do better than this.' I mean, that’s what great entrepreneurs do right,” she added.To hear more of Kara Goldin’s story and how she created Hint Water, listen to “No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- U.S. stocks closed slightly lower Friday as investors weighed weaker-than-expected GDP data.The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 40.82 (-0.19 percent) to finish at 20,940.51.The Nasdaq gave up 1.33 (-0.02 percent) to close at 6,047.61 while the S&P 500 finished at 2,384.20, down 4.57 (-0.19 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were little changed at about $49 per barrel.GDP: A day before President Trump marked his 100th day in office, the Commerce Department said the gross domestic product grew by just 0.7 percent in the first three months of his presidency. The fourth quarter saw a 2.1 percent gain for GDP.Winners and Losers: Time Inc. announced Friday the company is no longer looking to sell itself, causing the mass media company's stock to plummet 17 percent.Shares of Build-A-Bear Worshop jumped nearly 9 percent after earnings beat investors' expectations.
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  • Chobani(NEW YORK) -- The Chobani yogurt company is suing far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones for alleged defamation, after the shock jock published what the company says are false and defamatory stories.At issue in the suit filed Monday is a video published on Jones’ InfoWars website and social media accounts earlier this month in which two InfoWars staffers discuss the publicity that Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya received for hiring refugees at his plant in Twin Falls, Idaho, and the separate case of three refugee youth who pleaded guilty in the assault of a 5-year-old girl in the same city.The youth, who had no connection to the plant, were reportedly ages 7 to 14 and were involved in inappropriately touching the girl while filming the incident.“In the video, Mr. Knight republishes the false statement that the Chobani plant brought crime and tuberculosis to the community,” the suit said.The assault was "unrelated to Chobani," it said.The video was promoted on the @PlanetPrisonTV Twitter account under the headline: “Idaho Yogurt Maker Caught Importing Migrant Rapists.” The assertion made in the headline was not made in the video.The lawsuit alleges that the Twitter account is controlled by InfoWars and that the video was retweeted by Jones himself.Jones and InfoWars “declined to remove the defamatory statements or publish a retraction,” the suit says. “Defendants promoted the video with the defamatory headline ‘Idaho Yogurt Maker Caught Importing Migrant Rapists’ despite knowing that the statement was false or while clearly doubting the truth of the statement.”In the video, the two staffers refer to the assault case -- in which three refugee youths pleaded guilty -- as “the Idaho rape case.”But “police and prosecutors said there was no rape,” according to the Twin Falls Times-News. Instead, the unnamed boys pleaded guilty in the assault.Chobani is seeking punitive damages worth at least $10,000.Responding to the suit, Jones appeared in a video posted to the InfoWars website on Tuesday, in which he blamed billionaire George Soros, saying “he had his Islamicist-owned and backed U.S. company openly file suit against InfoWars Tuesday for stating information that is part of the public record.”“I’m not saying he [Ulukaya] consciously brought in people he thought were going to rape, but people he brought in and force-fed on America have now been implicated, indicted, and now have pled guilty to that,” Jones also said.An email ABC News sent to Soros’ foundation seeking comment was not immediately returned. He is not mentioned in the suit and there’s no suggestion that he has any connection.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The major indexes closed higher Tuesday, and the tech-heavy Nasdaq reached a new milestone, ahead of President Trump's announcement on tax reform.The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 232.23 (+1.12 percent) to finish at 20,996.12.The Nasdaq jumped 41.67 (+0.70 percent) to close at 6,025.49, hitting above 6,000 for the first time. The S&P 500 finished at 2,388.61, up 14.46 (+0.61 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were about 1 percent higher at under $50 a barrel.Tax Reform: On Wednesday, investors will pay close attention when President Trump announces a tax reform proposal ahead of his 100th day in office. Under the new tax plan, the president has said individuals and businesses will receive large tax cuts.Winners and Losers: Shares of Netflix, Inc. soared 6 percent after the streaming service landed a Chinese licensing deal.Health insurance company Anthem Inc. will likely not renew its contract with Express Scripts, sending the pharmacy benefit management organization's stock to tumble 11 percent.
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  • United Airlines(CHICAGO) -- The officers who forcibly removed Dr. David Dao from a United Airlines flight earlier this month said the passenger responded in an "aggressive manner" when he was ordered to give up his seat and flailed his arms as he fought with the responders, according to a Chicago Department of Aviation incident report obtained by ABC News on Monday.Dao, a 69-year-old physician from Kentucky, allegedly acted "violently” and yelled "I am not leaving this flight that I paid money for. I don't care if I get arrested,’” when the responding officers tried to persuade him to get off the flight, according to the incident report, which was released Monday in response to a public records requests.ABC News also obtained police dispatch audio that suggests the responding officers and medics were operating under the assumption that the flight was overbooked and that Dao was creating a disturbance on the plane. However, the flight was never overbooked; instead, four passengers were asked to get off the flight so that four United employees could take their seats.The report reveals for the first time the names the four officers who were involved in the April 9 incident, for which Dao said left him with injuries that he is still being treated.In a supplemental incident report, one of the officers said Dao’s “combative” flailing motions made the officers lose their grip on him, causing him to fall and hit his his mouth on the armrest across from him.That report also stated that a responding officer eventually removed Dao "by dragging him due to the fact that the subject would not stand up."In a separate report released Monday, the Chicago Police Department said Dao was seen hitting his face on an armrest as aviation officers "attempted to escort" him off of the flight.The incident, which was videotaped by other passengers at the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, sparked a national outcry and three of the involved aviation officers were subsequently placed on leave, according to the aviation department.United CEO Oscar Munoz apologized for the incident and has vowed that the company will conduct a "thorough review” of the "truly horrific event.”The aviation department also released its use of force policy, which indicated that security personnel should use force only when "reasonably necessary to defend a human life, effect an arrest or control a person," and that the force used "shall only be that which is necessary to overcome the resistance being offered by an offender and to effect lawful objectives."The department said the policy was sent to all officers in the aftermath of the incident.Dao’s attorney, Thomas Demetrio, told ABC News on Monday that he and Dao are "getting ready" to take legal action.Demetrio is also representing an American Airlines passenger who is at the center of another viral video posted to Facebook on Friday. That footage shows an intense confrontation between a flight attendant and at least two passengers after a woman tried to bring her double-wide stroller on board a plane.
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