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  • Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — On May 23, a new millionaire was made when a winner came forward to claim a $24 million New York Lottery prize just two days before the ticket was set to expire, according to a news release from the organization.The lucky individual, who will be identified at a later date pending New York Lottery security's background review, said news coverage of the soon-to-expire ticket prompted them to search for the ticket in their home where it was found among other old tickets, said the news release.The individual purchased the single winning ticket on May 25, 2016 at Renu Corp Grocery & Tobacco located at 158 Church Street in the Tribeca neighborhood of New York City."We are thrilled that this lucky winner was able to locate this life-changing ticket," said Gweneth Dean, Director of the Commission’s Division of the Lottery in the news release. "We look forward to introducing this multimillionaire who came forward in the nick of time."The winner came to the Lottery's Beaver Street Customer Service Center in Lower Manhattan to claim the multi-million dollar prize with just two days to spare before the deadline of May 25.Lottery prizes can be claimed up to a year after a drawing; if they are unclaimed, the winnings are returned to the prize pool for future winners.The tickets winning numbers were 05-12-13-22-25-35 Bonus #:51. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Doug Terry(WASHINGTON) — Officials from two leading auto safety organizations are calling for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the federal agency tasked with investigating potential defects, to investigate a series of fires in parked BMWs following an ABC News report last week.Meanwhile, several new consumer complaints from BMW owners reporting similar incidents have appeared in NHTSA’s database and on BMW owners’ blogs in the past several days.Calling the 43 fires uncovered by ABC News “disturbing,” Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety, said NHTSA should take a serious look at the reports."They definitely should," Shahan said. “They should be investigating and getting documents from BMW and find out what's going on.”Jackie Gillan, president of Advocates for Highway & Auto Safety, also urged NHTSA to investigate."There needs to be a more aggressive approach to look at this," Gillan said.A NHTSA spokesperson said Tuesday the agency “is monitoring this issue and urges anyone with information on this issue to contact NHTSA.”The agency is directing consumers to its website, NHTSA.gov, to send a complaint and upload accompanying photos, police reports, insurance reports and other information that may be relevant.“NHTSA technical experts review each and every call, letter and online report of an alleged safety problem that is filed," a spokesperson said in a statement to ABC News.One of the new complaints submitted to NHTSA claimed that a 2015 328XI caught fire while parked in June 2016, meaning the vehicle was then just a year old.Another complaint reported a fire in a BMW that had been parked on a driveway for four days. “Awoke to a car completely engulfed in flames,” the report states.Additional consumer complaints, some of them echoing the problems outlined in the ABC News report, poured in through social media among the thousands of comments posted in reaction to the report.“There are a lot more people out there,” wrote one viewer on Facebook. “This happened to my BMW 6 months ago. I have video and photos.”Based on consumer complaints to NHTSA, fire department reports, local news reports, complaints from online blogs and interviews with BMW owners, ABC News created its own database of parked BMW vehicle fire incidents in North America over the last five years among various years and models.Each vehicle was checked through NHTSA’s database and through Carfax, a site that provides a vehicle’s history, using its vehicle identification number (VIN) or its license plate number. Any vehicle that had an open recall for a fire-related issue was eliminated from the list.ABC News also provided BMW with detailed information – including VIN, the name of the owner and the date of the incident – for the 17 cases highlighted in our investigation so the company could have the opportunity to investigate and comment on each case.BMW issued a response to ABC News’ investigation on the company’s website, saying that fires are “rare” but the company “takes every incident very seriously.”“We at BMW empathize with anyone who has experienced a vehicle fire,” the company said. “We understand it is a traumatic event and the safety of our customers is of utmost importance to us.”BMW also said the vehicle information ABC News provided showed that these vehicles “span an age range of 1-15 years, accumulated mileage of up to 232,250 miles and multiple generations and model types. In the few cases that we have inspected and are able to determine root cause, we have not seen any pattern related to quality or component failure. Vehicle fires can result from a wide variety of external reasons unrelated to product defect.”A spokesperson further suggested several other potential causes of car fires other than
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  • Starbucks(ST. LOUIS) — It's an iced-coffee lover's summer dream come true.Starbucks on Monday began testing coffee ice cubes in iced coffee drinks in two markets, St. Louis and Baltimore, according to spokesperson Holly Shafer. She called it a "very small test" that includes just 100 stores of the nearly 25,000 Starbucks in the country."It's one of several tests going on," Shafer told ABC News. "Our scale allows us to test things quickly to see what's next."She said the company then gathers feedback from customers and employees.In the participating stores, customers can add ice that's been made using Starbucks coffee to any iced espresso or brewed coffee beverage for 80 cents. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here we go again. After Nordstrom introduced the $85 Medium Wrapped Leather Stone; $425 pre-muddied jeans with fake mud; and a destroyed high-top sneaker for $1425, now French luxury fashion house Chanel is selling a boomerang for $1,325.The boomerang is listed on Chanel's website under "Other Accessories" in the 2017 spring-summer pre-collection The product description lists the item as wood and resin and the color as black. The boomerang is naturally adorned with the Chanel logo.The BBC reports that not everyone is thrilled about it.Gabrielle Sullivan, chief executive of the Indigenous Arts Code, said, "It's simply a misappropriation of aboriginal culture.”Aboriginal artist Bibi Barba said boomerangs are not only a hunting weapon used by Australia's indigenous people, "They are a cultural symbol for us. A lot indigenous artist do artwork on them and this artwork is different in different parts of the country, it holds different meaning."Barba also points out the irony of the bigger picture, saying, "Chanel and other luxury fashion brands hate it when people steal their logos and make copies of their products. So it would be a good point for them to make amends."The French company issued a statement saying, "Chanel is extremely committed to respecting all cultures, and regrets that some may have felt offended."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In the wake of a worldwide cyber attack that has debilitated more than 200,000 organizations in over 150 countries, experts shared tips with ABC News on simple things you can do to help protect yourself against a ransomware attack.Ransomware is defined as "a type of malicious software, or malware, designed to block access to a computer system until a ransom is paid," according to a 2016 U.S. Department of Homeland Security blog post.This weekend's unprecedented ransomware attack started Friday, but authorities said Sunday that the worst may be yet to come as many people return to work on Monday.The U.S. Computers Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) issued specific advice to protect against the recent WannaCry ransomware threat that spread this weekend, saying computer users should "Be careful when clicking directly on links in emails, even if the sender appears to be known."The U.S. CERT also advised to use caution when opening attachments, and to be "particularly wary of compressed or ZIP file attachments."Quincy Larson, a software engineer and the founder of freecodecamp.com told ABC News that ransomware is usually spread through your email."If you are going to be infected by ransomware, it will happen when you get an email or some other form of message that's asking you to download and run it, and when that file runs, then usually, the attacker will encrypt your hard drive, or encrypt part of your hard drive so that your computer is still operable and you can continue to use it, but you can't access all your files," Larson explained.Larson told ABC News the best way to prevent ransomware attacks is to make sure that every time your operating system or a software asks if it can run a system or security update -- you update it."It's absolutely critical that you install updates to your operating system and to all your software as they become available," Larson said. "One of the reasons why you download the updates is not just for new features but it's also for additional security."Larson said that unlike larger companies and organizations, "individuals are particularly vulnerable because they don't necessarily have recently updated software and one of the best ways you can prevent ransomware or malware in general from getting on your computer is just to make sure that your operating system ... is updated to the latest version.""Finally, just be very vigilant," Larson said. "You need to constantly look out for emails that seem suspicious, and you need to err on the side of not downloading random files."Jason Tanz, the site director at Wired, echoed Larson's sentiments, telling ABC News, "individuals are particularly easy to prey on because most of them are not being extremely up-to-date with their software. They're not necessarily paying attention to all the security updates, and therefore they're more likely to be vulnerable."Tanz added that "if you're the victim of a ransomware attack you'll open your computer and instead of your normal files you'll see a pop-up appear that says, 'Surprise, we've taken control of your computer and if you want access to your files you need to pay us.'"Tanz cited this weekend's ransomware attack as an example of why you should always update all your software, saying, "For instance this latest ransomware attack only hit earlier versions of Microsoft Windows."Tanz said another way to protect yourself against ransomware attacks is to back up your files remotely."The next thing is to make sure you're backing up your files every day, and that means on a hard drive that is not connected to the internet," Tanz added. "Ransomware is only effective if you don't have record of the files they're holding for ransom."Tanz said if you have all your files backed up, it leaves those using ransomware against you, "without any power whatsoever.""Finally, the last thing to do is to be very suspicious about clicking unfamiliar links," adding that you should also use caution when, "downlo
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