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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Both are globally recognized icons, yet their areas of expertise are seemingly worlds apart. One is Tim Cook, the tireless and philanthropic chief executive officer of Apple Inc.; the other is Malala Yousafzai, the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate activist who fights for -- and puts her life on the line for -- girls' education around the world. The unlikely pair came together on a recent January afternoon in downtown Beirut to announce a shared vision.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Furloughed federal employees in Washington wishing to drown their sorrrows may do so at a discount for the duration of the government shutdown. Once Friday's midnight deadline came and went without a deal to avert a shutdown, a slew of bars and restaurants in the nation's capital began courting civil servants. Capitol Lounge, a popular after-work haunt for Hill staffers, tweeted its newly-minted "Shutdown Cocktails" menu, consisting of $5 cocktails for patrons with a federal employee ID. "I'm not expressing any political opinion here, but I am thankful I did get a drink special tonight," a federal worker who doesn’t want to be identified told ABC affiliate WJLA at Capitol Lounge. The libations at Capitol Lounge include the "C'mon Chuck," a nod to Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. There's also a vodka martini in honor of Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., called "To Flake or not to Flake?" Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky also gets an honorable mention with "Rand's Neighborhood Affair," a cocktail consisting of champagne, peach schnapps, cranberry juice and grass clippings. And Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, is being honored with the "Durbin Soda," consisting of Kentucky Dale's bourbon, soda and snitch sauce. Iconic Italian restaurant Carmine's, located in downtown Washington, has begun serving a "bittersweet beverage" called the "Hard Times Cocktail" for $12. It consists of Campari, bourbon, orange juice and thyme-infused simple syrup. Any federal employee who orders a Happy Hour food item will get an extra jumbo meatball, the restaurant said. "They can #shutdown the #government but they can’t shutdown your fun," Carmine's tweeted. "Federal Workers get All Day #HappyHour as Long as the shutdown continues." At the Queen Vic, an English pub on H Street, draft beers are being discounted 30 percent for the duration of the shutdown for federal employees." Come scream at the tv and drown your sorrows!" the watering hole tweeted. Granville Moore's, a gastropub on H Street, is also offering a 30 percent discount to federal workers. "The government's closed, but don't worry federal workers, we'll make this a little easier on you," the watering hole tweeted. Another H Street establishment, weekend brunch hotspot The Pug, tweeted that it is extending its 30 percent discount for first responders and teachers to federal employees. Hank's Cocktail Bar said federal employees are eligible for Happy Hour food and drinks all day long, as well as $9 hot toddies. "Let’s turn this shutdown around! Enjoy HAPPY HOUR FOOD & DRINK, and $9 HOT TODDIES ALL DAY when you show your Government ID," the Petworth neighborhood haunt tweeted. In the Capitol Hill neighborhood, Union Pub, is offering $4 rail cocktails and shots to all customers for the duration of the shutdown. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Investigators with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office raided on Thursday the New York City offices of Newsweek Media Group, the parent company of Newsweek and International Business Times.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In these final days of 2017, experts are advising potential car buyers that if they're considering a new set of wheels, now is a good time to put the pedal to the metal before the new year arrives. "I used to think, 'Why would somebody buy a car around the holidays?' You know you'd see those ads and everyone was going, 'Well, you know, who buys a car at Christmas time?'" said Matt DeLorenzo, managing editor of Kelley Blue Book. "Actually it's been maybe over the last 10 years, that the end of the year has become sort of a prime car-selling season -- mainly because of these holiday event programs." According to DeLorenzo, manufacturers are closing out the books on the 2017 model year and still have a lot of cars left to sell. "You're seeing some pretty sizable rebates and incentives," he told ABC News. "You can see discounts as much as 20 [percent] to 25 percent off the MSRP [manufacturer suggested retail price]. ... You'll see some deals anywhere from [$6,000] to $8,000 off of new cars." DeLorenzo said buyers could see a bit deeper discounts this year because sales have slowed slightly -- down 2 percent over previous sales. "They're trying to push the deals to get the volume back up to record levels," he said. And if you're looking for a sedan, DeLorenzo said luck is on your side. "We're seeing the biggest discounts on sedans. People have been moving away from the four-door family cars into SUVs and crossovers," he said. "You'll see fewer deals on cross-overs and SUVs and the really big deals on the four-door sedans, particularly in the midsize and full-size segments." DeLorenzo shared the following tips for buyers looking to get their first car or simply add to their fleet: 1. Do your homework. Look for discounts and/or cash upfront. Find out what the car is worth. Arrange financing. 2. Shop prices on the internet. Go online before you head to the dealership. 3. Check your zip code online. Regional rebates may be offered for your part of the country. 4. Are you a recent graduate or veteran? If you are, there may be rebates that apply to those groups. 5. Negotiate your best deal upfront. Always have something your back pocket to use as a negotiating tool. Prices for the same car could vary at competing dealerships so use that as leverage.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images(PORTLAND, Wash.) -- A Washington state family is suing Alaska Airlines and a contractor for allegedly neglecting to properly care for a disabled 75-year-old grandmother who suffered a fall down a Portland International Airport escalator in June and later died. After her flight from Hawaii landed in Portland in June 2017, contractors at the airport assisted Bernice Kekona into a seat-belted wheelchair, both the lawsuit and the airline said. The employees from Huntleigh, USA were supposed to transport the 75-year-old grandmother to her next gate, according to the family, but she was somehow left alone. According to the lawsuit, Kekona showed her ticket to an Alaska Airlines employee stationed at her arrival gate who gestured the direction the grandmother needed to go in. Minutes later, the lawsuit says, Kekona was moving through the airport, confused and lost. She stopped at a security checkpoint and an airport store looking for her departure gate. Airport surveillance video obtained by ABC-affiliate KXLY, shows Kekona at the top of an escalator, which she later said she thought was an elevator. By the time she realized her misjudgment, her wheelchair was on the escalator and she was tumbling nearly 21 steps down the moving escalator. Video shows one man, riding up the opposite side of the pair of escalators, leaping over the sides to assist. Several others also rushed over, including one woman who found the emergency stop button. Kekona and her chair were eventually uprighted, but she was hurt. Her family says she suffered trauma to her head and chest, a cut to her Achilles tendon and gashes on the side of her face. Her tendon would never heal, according to her family. Federal law regulations require airlines to provide assistance to the disabled when traveling, including when making connections. Huntleigh, USA, who is contracted by Alaska Airlines for disability services through the airport, said it can’t comment yet because it has not seen the lawsuit filed Wednesday in King County Superior Court. Alaska Airlines said an investigation is continuing, but "it appears that Ms. Kekona declined ongoing assistance in the terminal and decided to proceed on her own to her connecting flight." "It also appears that when her family members booked the reservation, they did not check any of the boxes for a passenger with “Blind/low vision,” “Deaf/hard of hearing,” or “Other special needs (i.e., developmental or intellectual disability, senior/elderly).” So, there was no indication in the reservation that Ms. Kekona had cognitive, visual, or auditory impairments." Alaska added that they were "heartbroken by this tragic and disturbing incident." The family's lawyer says Kekona suffered constant, serious pain in the months to following the incident. In September, her wound to her tendon became so severe, doctors amputated her leg below the knee, according to a lawsuit filed by the family. Her blood pressure never recovered from the surgery and Kekona died the next day. Her family is now suing Alaska Airlines and Huntleigh, USA for failing to provide what they say was agreed upon gate-to-gate transportation. "I just want them to make it right. It's not going to bring her back, but someone needs to own up. Someone needs to take responsibility," said granddaughter Danielle Kekahuna. Federal law regulations require airlines to provide assistance to the disabled when traveling, including when making connections.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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