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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As an arctic chill grips much of the country, home heating costs are soaring. The U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts they could spike as much as 32 percent this winter. That could increase even more if temperatures continue to drop below the current forecast.So how can consumers save on heating bills this winter?Tip 1: Turn down your thermostat. For every degree you drop the thermostat you can save 5 percent on heating costs, according to California Energy Commission’s Consumer Energy Center.According to the U.S. Department of Energy turning your thermostat back 10 to 15 degrees for eight hours a day can save around 10 percent a year on your heating and cooling bills.Tip 2: Keep the heat inside. Scott Fisher, co-founder of Ciel Power LLC tells ABC News, “One of the simplest things we can do that most homeowners can do is simply replace the existing incandescent bulbs with LED retrofit kits.”For as little as $15 LED retrofit kits will keep warm air from seeping out of the house and use only a fraction of the energy of an average light bulb.Tip 3: Weather-proof. Using a weatherstrip or caulk to seal doors and windows can have a huge savings impact on your heating bill, for a relatively inexpensive cost. And if your home has an attic, be sure to use a weather strip around that door as well.Tip 4: Check your fireplace. The DOE suggests keeping your fireplace damper closed unless there is a fire burning, as it’s like having a window wide open during the winter. Alternatively if you have a fireplace you never use – plug and seal the chimney flue to keep warm air from escaping.Tip 5: Close your drapes. Even simply closing the curtains and drapes can help to further insulate your windows keeping the warm air in and the cold air out further reducing your energy cost.
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  • Courtesy Gutwa Family(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Gladys Makori's son arrived home for Christmas in a casket.Griffin Gutwa appeared to be a fit and healthy 18-year-old freshman embarking on his dream of becoming a neurosurgeon, Makori, 49, told ABC News in an exclusive interview.But that dream ended days before Christmas, when Gutwa died on board Delta flight 1687, leaving behind a family grappling for answers.Gutwa, who came to the United States in 2004 by way of Mombasa, Kenya, was a devout deacon at his Minneapolis church and soon followed his cousin to sunnier pastures at the University of San Diego, where relatives said he was studying to be a doctor.Gutwa, known by the nickname "Babu," which means "grandfather" in Swahili, led a very fit and disciplined life, Makori said. There was no indication anything was wrong with him physically, she added.“He has never tasted alcohol,” Makori said. “Never smoked, nothing. He was a good Christian boy.”But on Dec. 22, Gutwa closed his eyes to take a nap on his flight from San Diego to Minneapolis-St. Paul.He never woke up again.Heartbreaking newsMakori arrived at the airport at just after 6 p.m. on Dec. 22 to meet her son, she said. But when she got there, she was told the plane was delayed.“We were told to come back at 8 o’clock,” she said. “We weren’t told why.”Makori returned to the airport two hours later, this time with her husband, Gideon Gutwa, and their other children. When they pulled up to the terminal, they were met by police, Makori said.“They asked, ‘Are you Griffin’s parents?’” she recalled. “We said, ‘Yes.’”Makori said they were told to park, and then officials pulled the parents aside.“I asked, ‘What happened? What happened?’ and they said, 'Griffin died on board,'” Makori said through tears.Midair emergencyThe flight from San Diego took off without any issue.Griffin Gutwa settled into his seat, and when the snack cart rolled by, he asked the flight attendant for warm water, declining any food, Makori said police told her. He then dozed off.But an hour and a half into the flight, Griffin Gutwa started having trouble breathing, Makori said police told her. A fellow passenger noticed and called for help.The flight crew then asked passengers on the plane if they had any medical training, Makori said police told her. A psychiatrist and two nurses responded, and tended to Griffin Gutwa, who by this point wasn't breathing, she said.One of the professionals commenced CPR and the pilot diverted the flight to the nearest airport -- Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Makori said police told her.Paramedics met the plane on the ground and attempted to perform "lifesaving measures" before he was pronounced dead at 5:52 p.m., Sioux Falls police spokesman Officer Sam Clemens confirmed to ABC News.In a statement to ABC News, Delta said: "On Dec. 22, the flight crew of Delta flight 1687 from San Diego to Minneapolis/St. Paul diverted to Sioux Falls following a customer medical emergency on board. The flight attendants used their training and engaged medical professionals on the flight to assist in the situation, and paramedics met the flight upon landing at Sioux Falls."Based on preliminary findings from an autopsy, Griffin had an enlarged heart condition known as cardiomegaly, according to the Minnehaha County Coroner’s Office. However, Griffin's cause of death is still pending.A quest for answersSince she was told of her son's passing on board the flight, Makori said she's learned little of what happened in midair from Delta."There's a lot of questions I don't know," she said. "It's shocking [the airline] have not called yet to give us any information."She added: "I want the Delta people to call me. They haven't called as a sign of courtesy to say, 'Sorry for your loss.'"Delta told ABC News that one of its representatives reached out to Griffin Gutwa's family a
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  • Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for Teen Vogue(NEW YORK) -- Once thought of as a glossy fashion bible geared toward brand-conscious girls, Teen Vogue is evolving.“When Teen Vogue started out, Teen Vogue was an aspirational fashion magazine for fashion lovers. You know it was the little sister to Vogue. And over the years we've realized that our mission was really to become more focused on making this an inclusive community, that speaks to every kind of young person,” Elaine Welteroth, Teen Vogue’s 31-year-old editor-in-chief, told ABC News’ “Nightline.”The digital magazine, now primarily online, is filling more of its page with stories that appeal to its socially conscious audiences on topics including: immigration, race, wellness and politics.“[President Donald] Trump gets too much credit for Teen Vogue’s evolution. Teen Vogue has been changing the narrative and pushing the envelope and covering news and politics and social justice issues for the I’d say the last year and a half to two years,” Welteroth said.Watch the full "Nightline" piece Tuesday night at 12:35 a.m. ET.Most recently, Teen Vogue weighed in on the #MeToo movement, with actress Ashley Judd making a video about her personal experience on standing up to sexual harassment and giving advice to young girls for the publication in October 2017.Judd is now one of more than 300 women in Hollywood leading the #TimesUp initiative to fight sexual harassment and gender disparity. The initiative has raised over $14 million for working-class women to seek justice.Teen Vogue’s shift to social activism is paying off. The brand has seen huge growth, garnering 10 million monthly page views and 12 million social followers.And along with digital editorial director Phillip Picardi, Welteroth, Teen Vogue’s youngest and first black editor-in-chief in its history, is getting some credit for their success.“It has become this community of civic-minded, really socially conscious politically active curious ambitious young people who crave the truth who aren't afraid to speak truth,” Welteroth said. “I think we speak to a certain mindset and it's about you know inspiring people who are progressive thinkers who want to see change. And so that could mean a 59-year-old white man. It could mean Dan Rather, who retweets us all the time.”Teen Vogue is, of course, still a fashion magazine. And Welteroth has become an influencer of sorts on her own. She sits in the front rows of New York’s fashion shows and has her own following on social media. She even made a guest appearance on the ABC sitcom “Black-ish.”In a sense, Teen Vogue has seized the moment, tapping into what matters to Generation Z, the post-millennials who appear to be more civic-minded both on and off social media.The magazine held its first ever “Teen Vogue Summit” in Los Angeles in December, where young attendees learned how to change the world. The event brought together CEOs, celebrities and everyday teens fighting for social justice.Eighteen-year-old Nadya Okamoto and 19-year-old Hunter Schaefer, who were named in Teen Vogue’s “21 under 21,” were in attendance at the summit.Okamoto is a Harvard University sophomore who recently ran for city council in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She earned the nicknamed “Period Girl” for fighting for women’s health rights.“Teen Vogue is forming and to be this kind of powerhouse incubator that takes young activists and puts them in front of other young people and says you can do this too right,” Okamoto told “Nightline.”Schaefer fought against North Carolina’s bathroom bill.“I think we as generation, Generation Z, are using our resources. We're often perceived as inauthentic or self-serving or you know really just focused on promoting ourselves or making it on Instagram or something. But I think that is tha
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- U.S. stocks kicked off 2018 in the green.The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared 104.79 (+0.42 percent), finishing the session at 24,824.01.The Nasdaq jumped 103.51 (+1.50 percent) to close at 7,006.90, while the S&P 500 finished trading at 2,695.79, up 22.18 (+0.83 percent) for the day.Crude oil prices were little changed at about $60 per barrel.Winners and Losers:  General Electric's stock price slumped about 45 percent in 2017, but on Tuesday shares were up 3.04 percent.FAANG stocks all posted gains; Facebook +2.81 percent, Apple +1.79 percent, Amazon +1.67 percent, Netflix +4.75 percent, and Google-parent Alphabet +1.88 percent.
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  • John Lamparski/WireImage via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- After filling in for Matt Lauer following his termination at the end of last year, Hoda Kotb was just named a full-time "Today" co-anchor.Kotb, 53, and her now co-anchor, Savannah Guthrie, made the announcement Tuesday morning on the show."This has to be the most popular decision NBC News has ever made," Guthrie said.Kotb replied, "I'm pinching myself!"Her fellow "Today" coworkers all took to Twitter to celebrate the promotion.Kotb filled in for Lauer after he was fired from NBC News at the end of November following "inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace," the network said at the time.Lauer responded the day after he was terminated by sharing his own statement, which said, "There are no words to express my sorrow and regret for the pain I have caused others by words and actions. To the people I have hurt, I am truly sorry ... Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterized, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed."Kotb has been with NBC News for almost two decades, working for shows like "Dateline" and opposite anchors like Kathie Lee Gifford.
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