• Courtesy of Andrew Richardson(NEW YORK) -- One California Starbucks barista got a surprise on March 21 when a customer returned to apologize for her behavior from the day before.Andrew Richardson, 20, was floored when he received a handwritten card and $50 bill from his customer named Debbie, whom he admits he didn’t even think was that rude.“On the 20th, this woman, Debbie, came through the drive through while I was working. She was extremely pleasant, and we had some friendly conversation while her drinks were being made,” Richardson, of Bishop, California, told ABC News. “She had multiple drinks, and we didn't have drink carriers. I informed her and she was a touch frustrated like anyone would be.”In addition to being out of drink carriers, he also couldn’t take her trash she was hoping to throw away.“I cannot do this because it would be a California health code violation,” he explained. “She then became a bit more frustrated, but nothing that I would perceive as rudeness. At worst, she was playfully sassy. I really didn't think too much of it.”Richardson carried on with his day and didn’t give it a second thought.“It was not a big deal at all in my eyes,” he said. “Being in customer service you can experience a lot of negativity and frustration. I try and counter it with positivity and patience. This was an extremely mild interaction compared to other incidents.”But Debbie apparently felt otherwise.“The next day, she came back. I happened to walk by the window when she was there,” Richardson recalled. “She asked me if I was working the window yesterday. I said ‘yes.’ She then became extremely apologetic. She felt genuinely terrible about our interaction the day before. I was so heart warmed to even get a verbal apology. It doesn't happen much.”The two chatted for a few minutes and Richardson said her in-person “genuine apology” alone was enough to lift his spirits, without even knowing what was going to happen next.“She then handed me the card, [and] I was even more grateful and uplifted,” he said. “I thanked her for another minute and she left.”He hadn’t yet opened the card before Debbie drove away.“I returned to it later, opened it, and I was completely shocked,” he said of discovering the money. “Without the money, this was one of the most beautiful and heartfelt things I have ever read. It absolutely made my day when I read it. The money was unnecessary. The card alone was the best part. I would have turned the money down had I opened it when she was there. It's hard to take things like that.”Richardson’s supervisor told him he could keep the money.“She handed it to him in a personal card so of course he was able to keep it,” one of the location’s supervisors, Angie Harris, told ABC News.“I think it was great. It’s always good to see those customer connections,” she added. “We’re really proud of him.”“Nothing like this has ever happened, it's unprecedented,” said the humbled barista. “This was easily one of the kindest things I've ever received. I'm very happy to know that there are still good, caring people in this world. I'm still smiling about it.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Jobless claims spiked higher last week, increasing by 15,000, according to the latest figures released Thursday by the Labor Department.For the week ending March 18, the number of people filing for benefits jumped from a revised level of 243,000 the previous week to 258,000.Now at 240,000, four-week moving average also increased by 1,000 from last week’s revised average of 239,000.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockYou've gone through your receipts, crunched the numbers, checked them twice and now you're ready to file your taxes. But there's one problem: You can't pay everything you owe Uncle Sam.
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  • Virgin America(SEATTLE) -- The Virgin America name is embarking on its final voyage.The parent company of Alaska Airlines announced Wednesday that it would be phasing out Virgin’s name following the merger of the two companies last December.“After careful consideration, the combined company will adopt Alaska's name and logo, retiring the Virgin America name likely sometime in 2019,” a statement said. However, the combined airline will adopt many of the brand elements that Virgin America enthusiasts love about their favorite airline, including enhanced in-flight entertainment, mood lighting, music and the relentless desire to make flying a different experience for guests. The goal is to create a warm and welcoming West Coast-inspired vibe.”Vice President of Marketing Sangita Woerner,said they wanted one name for their airline in order to be more consistent and efficient.The combined forces of the Alaska Air Group make up the fifth-largest carrier in the nation.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Starbucks(NEW YORK) -- If you already feel like there's a Starbucks on every street corner, get ready to see a whole lot more of the coffee chain's stores.The company announced on Wednesday plans to open 12,000 new stores globally by 2021, 3,400 of which will be in the U.S.The new locations will amount to more than 240,000 jobs around the world, including 68,000 positions in the U.S. alone.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- General Mills' heart was definitely in the right place when it took its Honey Nut Cheerios spokes-insect “BuzzBee” off its boxes, to raise awareness of declining bee populations. However, botanists are decrying a "bring the bees back" campaign that had consumers sending away for free packs of wildflowers to plant because some of the seeds will grow into invasive plants that aren't bee-friendly.  The company reportedly gave away some 1.5 billion seeds as part of the campaign, which actually began in Canada."At worst these things can potentially introduce weedy plants where they might not currently exist," said Eric Mader, a native plant specialist with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. "At best … I don’t know if there is a best."Experts agree private planting of the seeds wouldn't necessarily be harmful but doing so on public land -- either deliberately or accidentally -- could lead them to spread in an uncontrolled manner.
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