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Weekly Economic Update

MidAmerica Financial Resources Presents:

 

WEEKLY ECONOMIC UPDATE

 

 

 

WEEKLYQUOTE

“Try not to become a man of success but rather to become a man of value.”

- Albert Einstein

 

 

WEEKLYTIP

Plan your charitable gifts well in advance of the end of the year; explore possibilities and define the size of such gifts today.

 

 

WEEKLYRIDDLE

They have wings. As they grow up, they also grow down. What are they?

 

Lastweek’sriddle:

Katherine and Sterling each have the same amount of pears. How many pears does Katherine need to give Sterling so that Sterling has 10 more pears than she does?

 

Lastweek’sanswer:

5. When Katherine gives Sterling 5 pears, she will lose 5 and he will gain five, resulting in a net difference of 10. So they both have at least 5 pears to begin with.

 

 

 

 

March 2, 2015

CPI SHOWS ANNUAL DEFLATION

Dipping 0.7% in January, the Labor Department’s Consumer Price Index posted a 0.1% annual retreat – its first yearly decline since 2009. As the core CPI rose 0.2% in January and gas prices are moving north, the headline CPI’s stint in deflation territory may be short-lived. The federal government also announced its second estimate of Q4 GDP last week – a passable 2.2% – and a 2.8% boost in hard goods orders for January.1,2

HOUSEHOLD CONFIDENCE DECLINES

The Conference Board’s monthly survey of consumers slipped 7.4 points in February to a reading of 96.4. At the end of January, the University of Michigan’s consumer sentiment index reached 98.1; the final February index came in lower at 95.4.2,3

PENDING HOME SALES, HOME PRICES RISE

The National Association of Realtors said housing contract activity increased 1.7% in January, and December’s S&P/Case-Shiller index showed a 4.5% overall annual increase in existing home prices. The Census Bureau noted an 0.2% dip in new home sales in January, however; the NAR found resales falling 4.9% in that month.2,4

FEBRUARY WAS FANTASTIC FOR STOCKS

Look at these monthly gains: S&P 500, 5.49%; Dow, 5.64%; Nasdaq, 7.08%. Last week, the S&P lost 0.27% and the Dow 0.04% while the Nasdaq rose 0.15%. Final numbers: DJIA, 18,132.70; Nasdaq, 4,963.53; S&P, 2,104.50. Oil fell 1.32% to $49.27 on the NYMEX, gold rose 1.21% to $1,213.60 on the COMEX.5,6

THIS WEEK: ISM’s January manufacturing index appears Monday, plus January’s consumer spending report and earnings from Progressive, NutriSystem and Molycorp. On Tuesday, the Street examines earnings from Best Buy, AutoZone, Smith & Wesson, Revlon, Bob Evans, TiVo and Dick’s Sporting Goods, and Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen speaks on bank regulation in New York. Wednesday brings February’s ADP employment change report, a new Beige Book from the Federal Reserve, ISM’s February services index and earnings from Abercrombie & Fitch, American Eagle, Korn/Ferry, PetSmart, Jamba, Tribune Publishing, Scripps Co. and H&R Block. February’s Challenger job cuts report arrives Thursday along with the latest bank stress test results from the Fed, new initial claims numbers and a report on January factory orders; earnings roll in from Chesapeake Utilities, Marcus & Millichap, Costco, Martha Stewart Living, Fresh Market, Quiksilver and Kroger. The Labor Department’s February employment report comes out Friday, as well as earnings from Foot Locker, BigLots! and Staples.

 

% CHANGE

Y-T-D

1-YR CHG

5-YR AVG

10-YR AVG

DJIA

+1.74

+11.43

+15.12

+6.84

NASDAQ

+4.80

+14.92

+24.35

+14.19

S&P 500

+2.21

+13.49

+18.11

+7.49

REAL YIELD

2/26 RATE

1 YR AGO

5 YRS AGO

10 YRS AGO

10 YR TIPS

0.24%

0.49%

1.48%

1.70%


Sources: online.wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov - 2/27/155,7,8,9,10

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends. 10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

 

 

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Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation (NPC), Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser.

MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to NPC.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world's largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.

1 - tinyurl.com/pn4rvqe [2/26/15]

2 - marketwatch.com/economy-politics/calendars/economic [2/27/15]

3 - investing.com/economic-calendar/michigan-consumer-sentiment-320 [2/27/15]

4 - usnews.com/news/business/articles/2015/02/25/us-new-home-sales-barely-nudge-up-in-january [2/25/15]

5 - markets.wsj.com/us [2/27/15]

6 - markets.on.nytimes.com/research/markets/commodities/commodities.asp [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=2%2F27%2F14&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=2%2F27%2F14&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=2%2F27%2F14&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=2%2F26%2F10&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=2%2F26%2F10&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=2%2F26%2F10&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=2%2F28%2F05&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=2%2F28%2F05&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

7 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=2%2F28%2F05&x=0&y=0 [2/27/15]

8 - treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [2/27/15]

9 - treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [2/27/15]

 

 

 

 


Signs of Elder Abuse

Signs of Elder Abuse

Physical, mental & financial warning signals.

 

Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

  

Is someone taking advantage of someone you love? June 15 is World Elder Abuse Prevention Day, a day to call attention to a crisis that may become even more common as baby boomers enter the “third acts” of their lives.1 

 

Every year, more than half a million American elders are abused or neglected. That estimate comes from the Centers for Disease Control, and the frequency of elder abuse may be greater as so many elders are afraid or simply unable to speak out about what is happening to them. In some cases, the abuse is limited to financial exploitation. In other cases, it may encompass neglect and physical or emotional cruelty.1

    

What should you watch out for? Different varieties of elder abuse have different signals, some less obvious than others.

 

Neglect. This is commonly defined as withholding or failing to supply necessities of daily living to an elder, from food, water and appropriate clothing to necessary hygiene and medicines. Signals are easily detectable and include physical signs such as bedsores, malnutrition and dehydration and flawed living conditions (i.e., faulty electrical wiring, fleas or cockroaches, inadequate heat or air conditioning).

 

Self-neglect also surfaces, stemming from the declining physical or mental capacity of an elder. If he or she foregoes proper hygiene, disdains needed medications or medical aids, or persists in living in an insect-ridden, filthy or fire-hazardous dwelling, intervene to try and change their environment for the better, for their health and safety.

 

Finally, neglect may also take financial form. If someone who has assumed a fiduciary duty to pay for assisted living, nursing home care or at-home health care fails to do so, that is a form of neglect which may be defined as elder abuse. The same goes for an in-home eldercare service provider that fails to provide an adequate degree or frequency of care.2

 

Abandonment. This occurs when a caregiver or responsible party flat-out deserts an elder – dropping him or her off at a nursing home, a hospital, or even a bus or train station with no plans to return. Hopefully, the elder has the presence of mind to call for help, but if not, a tragic situation will quickly worsen. When an elderly person seems to stay in one place for hours and appears confused or deserted, it is time to get to the bottom of what just happened for his or her safety.

   

Physical abuse. Bruises and lacerations are evident signals, but other indicators are less evident: sprains and dislocations, cracked eyeglass lenses, impressions on the arms or legs from restraints, too much or too little medication, or a strange reticence, silence or fearfulness or other behavioral changes in the individual.

   

Emotional or psychological abuse. How do you know if an elder has been verbally degraded, tormented, or threatened in your absence, or left in isolation? If the elder is not willing or able to let you know about such wrongdoing, watch for signals such as withdrawal from conversation or communication, agitation or distress, and repetitive or obsessive-compulsive actions linked to dementia such as rocking, biting or sucking.2

   

Financial abuse. When an unscrupulous relative, friend or other party uses an elder's funds, property, or assets illegally or dishonestly, this is financial exploitation of the elderly. This runs all the way from withdrawing an elder’s savings with his or her ATM card to forgery to improperly assuming conservatorship or power of attorney.2

     

How do you spot it? Delve into the elder’s financial life and see if you detect things like strange ATM withdrawals or account activity, additional names on a bank signature card, changes to beneficiary forms, or the sudden absence of collectibles or valuables.

 

Examine signatures on financial transactions – on closer examination, do they appear to be authentic, or studied forgeries? Have assets been inexplicably transferred to long-uninvolved heirs or relatives, or worse yet apparent strangers? Have eldercare bills gone unpaid recently? Is the level of eldercare being provided oddly slipshod given the financial resources being devoted to it?

       

Respect your elders; protect your elders. Some people aim to exploit senior citizens. Others simply don’t recognize or respect the responsibilities that come with eldercare. Whether the abuse is intentional or not, the emotional, physical or financial harm done can be reprehensible. Talk to or check in on your parents, grandparents, siblings or other elders you know and care for to see that they are free from such abuse.

   

MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@natplan.com.

www.mid-america.us

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

     

Citations.

1 - cdc.gov/features/elderabuse/ [6/9/14]

2 - ncea.aoa.gov/FAQ/Type_Abuse/index.aspx [2/10/15]





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