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  • Life insurance choices can be confusing.

     

    Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

     

    Man is Mortal. That makes life insurance a little unique and interesting, doesn’t it? We purchase things like health insurance, car insurance and home insurance, then hope we never have a need to use them. Life insurance is different because it’s a widely accepted fact that, sooner or later, each one of us will die.

     

    So many choices. When it comes to life insurance, there are many options. You may have heard terms like “whole life insurance,” “term insurance,” or “variable insurance,” but what do they all mean? And what are the differences? Well, first let me point out what they have in common: all life insurance policies provide payment to a beneficiary in the event of your death. Except for that basic tenet, the differences between policies can be major.

     

    Whole life insurance. This type of insurance covers your entire life (not just a portion or a “term” of it). Insurance companies tend to be cautious when selecting their investments, so the benefits could be, potentially, lower than if you invested on your own. Whole life policies also tend to cost more than “term” policies. This is both because they grow what is known as “cash value,” and, after a certain period of time, you will be able to borrow against or withdraw from your whole life benefits.

     

    Term insurance. Rather than covering your whole life, “term” insurance covers a pre-determined portion of your life. If you die within that term, your beneficiaries receive a death benefit. If not, generally, you get nothing. To put it simply, term insurance allows you to purchase more coverage for less money. Basically, you are betting on the probability of your death occurring within that specified “term.”

     

    Variable life insurance. Variable life insurance is a permanent insurance. Unlike whole life insurance, however, variable insurance allows you to invest the cash value of your policy into “subaccounts” (which can include money market funds, bonds or stocks). Variable insurance offers a bit of control, as the value and benefit depend upon the performance of the subaccounts you select. That means there could be significant risk involved, though, since the performance of your subaccounts cannot be guaranteed.

     

    Universal life insurance. With universal insurance, it all comes down to flexibility. It is permanent life insurance that provides access to cash values, which, over time, build up tax-deferred. You can choose the amount of coverage you feel is appropriate, and you retain the ability to increase or decrease that amount as your needs change (subject to minimums and requirements). You also have some flexibility in determining how much of your premium goes toward insurance, and how much is used within the policy’s investment element.

     

    So, which is right for you? Many factors come into play when deciding what type of life insurance will best suit your needs. The best thing to do is speak with a trusted and qualified financial professional who can assist you in looking at all the factors and help you to choose the policy that will work best for you.

     

    MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@natplan.com. www.mid-america.us

     

    This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

     

    Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation (NPC), Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser.
    MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to NPC.

     

     

     

  • ­MidAmerica Financial Resources Presents:

     

    WEEKLY ECONOMIC UPDATE

     

     

     

    WEEKLYQUOTE

     

    “Chance favors the prepared mind.”

     

    - Louis Pasteur

     

     

    WEEKLYTIP

     

    When a single parent is ill or injured and cannot work, a family can face a major financial crisis. Single parents should consider disability insurance in light of that risk.

     

    WEEKLYRIDDLE

     

    Three women leave work with only one umbrella to share between them. They all try to fit under the one umbrella as they walk to a cafe. When they reach the cafe, none of them are the least bit wet. Why?

     

     

    Lastweek’sriddle:

    What three letters can you use to spell out a word meaning “enemy?”

    Lastweek’sanswer:

    F, O, E.

     

     

     

     

    August 15, 2016

     

    RETAIL SALES WEAKEN

    July was the first month since March without a gain in U.S. retail purchases. The Census Bureau’s latest report showed retail sales were flat last month, a disappointment in the wake of June’s 0.8% climb. Car and truck sales advanced 1.1% during July, but, minus auto buying, retail sales were actually down 0.3% for the month.1

     

    HOUSEHOLD SENTIMENT INDEX IMPROVES

    The University of Michigan’s monthly consumer sentiment index rose to 90.4 last week in its preliminary August edition. It had ended July at a mark of 90.0. A consensus forecast of economists at Briefing.com had projected a 90.2 reading.1,2

     

    WHOLESALE INFLATION RETREATS

    The federal government’s Producer Price Index moved 0.4% lower in July as declining energy costs lessened inflation pressure. The core PPI fell 0.3%. In June, the headline PPI rose 0.5%; the core PPI, 0.4%.1,2

     

    OIL RALLIES, NASDAQ CLOSES AT RECORD HIGH

    August 8-12 was oil’s best week since early April: WTI crude settled at $44.67 on the NYMEX Friday after futures ascended 6.4% in five days. A 0.23% weekly gain led the Nasdaq Composite to a record close of 5,232.89 Friday. History was also made Thursday when the Nasdaq, S&P 500, and Dow Jones Industrial Average each settled at all-time highs – the first time that had happened since 1999. The Dow advanced 0.18% for the week; the S&P, 0.05%. The Dow settled Friday at 18,576.47; the S&P, at 2,184.05.1,3

     

    THIS WEEK: Sysco announces earnings on Monday. On Tuesday, the July CPI arrives, plus reports on July building permits, groundbreaking and industrial output, and earnings from Advance Auto Parts, Cree, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Home Depot, Popeye’s, TJX Companies, and Urban Outfitters. Wednesday, Wall Street considers the minutes from the July Federal Reserve policy meeting and earnings announcements from Agilent, American Eagle Outfitters, Analog Devices, Cisco, L Brands, Lowe’s, NetApp, NetEase, Staples, and Target. A new initial claims report appears Thursday, along with the Conference Board’s latest leading indicators index, and earnings from America’s Car-Mart, Bon-Ton Stores, Gap, Hormel Foods, Perry Ellis, Ross Stores, Stage Stores, Toro, and Walmart. On Friday, Deere & Co., Estee Lauder, Foot Locker, Stein Mart, and Tuesday Morning present earnings.

     

    % CHANGE

    Y-T-D

    1-YR CHG

    5-YR AVG

    10-YR AVG

    DJIA

    6.61

    6.75

    12.97

    6.75

    NASDAQ

    4.50

    3.74

    21.73

    15.43

    S&P 500

    6.85

    4.70

    17.06

    7.24

    REAL YIELD

    8/12 RATE

    1 YR AGO

    5 YRS AGO

    10 YRS AGO

    10 YR TIPS

    0.07%

    0.58%

    0.06%

    2.33%


    Sources: wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov - 8/12/163,4,5,6

    Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends. 10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

     

     

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    Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation (NPC), Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser.
    MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to NPC.

    This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world's largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

    Citations.

    1 - thestreet.com/story/13674220/1/stocks-close-mixed-as-crude-enjoys-best-weekly-gain-since-april.html [8/12/16]

    2 - briefing.com/investor/calendars/economic/2016/08/08-12 [8/12/16]

    3 - markets.wsj.com/us [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=8%2F12%2F15&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=8%2F12%2F15&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=8%2F12%2F15&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=8%2F12%2F11&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=8%2F12%2F11&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=8%2F12%2F11&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=8%2F11%2F06&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=8%2F11%2F06&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    4 - bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=8%2F11%2F06&x=0&y=0 [8/12/16]

    5 - treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [8/12/16]

    6 - treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [8/12/16]